Robotic Revolution: Technology’s Role in Redundancy

When we think of robots, we often think of famous ones from the movies, including C-3PO and R2-D2 from “Star Wars,” Johnny 5 from “Short Circuit,” and Wall-E from “Wall-E.” Those were fun robots with personalities that entertained us. But the robotic revolution is introducing us to the real deal, modern robots that require us to adjust to “the future.” These robots will play a role in everyday life and accepting some of them may be uncomfortable at first (especially if they take our job away!), but the robotic revolution is sure to simplify and make our lives easier, safer, and more efficient. But no need to worry about robots taking over the world! New technology means that more and more new jobs will continue to be created, jobs that only humans can perform! Domo arigato, Mr. Roboto, domo…domo.

Robotic Revolution: Technology’s Role in Redundancy
The ATM was just the start; automation is eating up more and more of the jobs we take for granted. Five million jobs in the world’s leading economies could disappear over the next five years because of advances in technology—the fourth industrial revolution. So which careers will technology feast on in the future? And what does the future look like?
Accounting, finance, data analysis
These jobs are threatened by new technology that converts receipts into machine-readable formats, encrypts them, and then allocates them to accounts. The platform gradually also self-learns, tracks invoices, counts sales and costs, and records liquidity.
Truck drivers
The industry has an incentive to automate: There are currently 5.7 million truck drivers in the USA. The Trucking industry is 30,000 truckers short—(figure to grow to) 250,000 by 2022. Caterpillar plans to debut a fleet of Self-driving, 240-ton mining trucks in coming years. The “driver” of the future might be a technician sitting at a desk somewhere, guiding several trucks at once (as with fighter pilots being replaced by remote-control drones).
Sales and service
Kiosks and self-service tech are the arch enemy of cashiers, sales representatives in manufacturing, retail salespeople, and real estate brokers.
The U.S. Postal Service
One of the hardest-hit industries, USPS will experience a loss of more than 54,500 jobs between 2008 and 2018. 30% of current positions (179,000) are expected to vanish by 2018.
Print media
Increased computer-processing capacity and the widespread availability of more elaborate desktop publishing software make it easier and more affordable for non-printing professionals to use. The future of desktop publishing looks bleak. There will be a decline of 23% jobs by 2008. Current employment: 26,400.
Robotic road ahead
According to The Economic Report of the President (2016), there’s an 83% chance that workers who earn $20 an hour or less could be replaced by robots. Those in the $40 an hour pay range face a 31% chance of having their jobs taken over by machines.
Momentum Machines’ multi-tasker bot makes (and flips) a gourmet hamburger in 10 seconds and could feasibly replace an entire McDonald’s crew. Universal Robots’ manufacturing robot solders, paints, screws, glues, grasps, and builds new parts for itself on the fly when they break. Google won a patent to build worker robots with personalities. And Oxford University researchers estimate that 47% of U.S. jobs could be automated within the next two decades.
The safe zone
There is only so much automation and machines can currently do. Which jobs seem safe from rampant technology? Here are a few doctors and nurses, home health aides, massage therapists, athletes, and creative occupations involving art, design and entertainment.
What does the future look like?
Look on the bright side! Types of jobs have been coming and going for centuries. For example, textile workers in England were replaced by mechanized looms in the 19th century. New jobs are created all the time. Ten years ago, we had not heard of app developers, market research data miners, educational or admissions consultants, millennial generational experts, social media managers, chief listening officers, cloud computing services, elder care service providers, sustainability experts, and user experience designers. Around 65% of children starting primary school today will end up working in jobs that don’t yet exist. New technology means the world’s their oyster. It’s an exciting digital age to be alive.
For more information, visit http://mozy.com/
Sources:
http://money.cnn.com/2016/01/18/news/economy/job-losses-technology-five-million/
https://techcrunch.com/2016/06/28/goodbye-accountants-startup-builds-ai-to-automate-all-your-accounting/
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-switch/wp/2013/11/20/what-will-happen-to-truck-drivers-when-self-driving-vehicles-take-over/
http://www.forbes.com/sites/meghancasserly/2012/05/11/10-jobs-that-didnt-exist-10-years-ago/2/#5bfd3f2249b5
http://www.wired.com/brandlab/2015/04/rise-machines-future-lots-robots-jobs-humans/

Getting Started with Your Data Disaster Recovery Plan

A business that doesn’t have a data disaster recovery plan in place is like the Titanic on its way to hit an iceberg without nearly enough lifeboats on board. Data is the lifeblood of any business, and how quickly and smoothly you can recover from a data disaster might eventually determine the survival of your business. Just knowing that you’re doing regular backups isn’t enough. You need to have a plan that covers every possible contingency, then you need to test your plan to find its weaknesses and adjust accordingly. A good data disaster recovery plan should also be updated frequently, to adjust to changes in your business.

No one can tell you what needs to be included in your plan without intimate knowledge of how your business operates. These plans aren’t boiler plates or one-size-fits-all propositions. However, the first steps for putting together disaster recovery plans are pretty much the same for all businesses, as are some of the things you need to consider as you begin developing a plan that’s tailored for your unique business.

Start with RTO and RPO

You start by assessing two metrics that have to do with your plan’s objectives. The first is the recovery time objective (RTO)—the time you have to restore usable access to your data after a disaster before the business begins to suffer. The other is the recovery point objective (RPO), which is the acceptable age of the files that will need to be recovered, which really means the amount of recent data loss that’s acceptable.

Both of these figures vary widely from business to business. A small convenience store using a point-of-sale system, for example, might be able to whip out a calculator and get by for days until a data connection is restored and might even be able to continue operations with a week or more of lost data. A stock brokerage, on the other hand, holding buy and sell orders tied to the market’s movements, might urgently need to have service restored in less than an hour with very little loss of data.

These two measurements will lay the foundation for the remainder of your data disaster recovery plan. For example, the mom-and-pop convenience store knows it should be able to make do by backing up to a thumb drive when preparing the daily bank deposit, while the brokerage firm will probably need to invest in the services of a secure and dependable cloud backup service like Mozy for frequent backups.

This is only the beginning, of course. From here you will need to determine, among other things, all of the different types of disasters that can threaten your data, whether man-made or natural, and develop contingency plans for each and every one—and more importantly, perhaps, figure out ways each scenario might be avoided. You’ll also need to test each scenario with data disaster “fire drills,” to discover any kinks in the procedures you’re establishing.

A good plan that covers all foreseeable disasters will be very complex, and a larger business will eventually need to seek outside consultants to fill in the gaps. It might be best to get started on your own first, however, so you can be a better help to the people you hire to help you.

The Biggest Mistakes You Can Make While Growing Your Business

As a small business owner, one of the most exciting (and terrifying) parts of owning your own business is when it starts to grow. You realize you’ve got a winning formula, but now you’re not sure where your business is going to go. The possibilities keep you up at night; unfortunately, so does the fear. You want your business to grow into something long term, so you don’t want to make any major mistakes. Well, we’re here to help you avoid some of the more common mistakes business owners make when their company starts to grow.

Mistake #1: Taking on all that growth yourself

If you own a small business, there’s a high chance your company started out as a one-person operation. You’re used to doing everything yourself, and honestly, it can be hard to let go of any of it. The problem is if you don’t pass anything off, things are going to start falling through the cracks. As you start getting more customers, things are going to get busier and busier.

To avoid this mistake, write down all the tasks you do for your small business. Next to those tasks, write down how much time each takes. Then, write down if you’re an expert at it, you do it satisfactorily, or you don’t know what you’re doing. Using that list, think about the kind of person you could hire to fill some of those roles that take a lot of time and you have little expertise in.

Mistake #2: Hiring the wrong employees

When you’re looking to hire employees, don’t make the common mistake of going with the easiest hire. Whether they’re a family friend, or they’re the least-expensive option, you can easily hire somebody that won’t perform, or worse, cause more stress. You have to make sure they are the right fit for your business needs.

Whatever role you’re hiring for, make sure you do your due diligence. Research the role online, look for advice that other business owners have hiring for that role, and look for specific interview questions. Look for the self-starters, the ones who don’t need a lot of hand-holding to get the job done. These people are the future leaders of your growing company.

Mistake #3: Not investing in your infrastructure

As your business grows, you need to take a hard look at what your location, your equipment, and your processes can handle. Take a few minutes and think about how your location, equipment, and processes would hold up if you had twice the amount of business. What about 10 times the business? One hundred times? You want your business to be scalable, so look for software solutions, equipment, and processes that can grow with your increasing business.

Mistake #4: Not preparing for cash flow needs

A huge mistake a lot of small business owners make is not preparing for future cash flow issues. Too many small businesses wait to apply for a loan until their business is in trouble, and at that point, capital can be hard to find. If your business is doing well, now is the time to go to a lender for a line of credit or a business loan. Also, consider applying for a Small Business Administration loan, which have much lower rates than typical small business loans.

If you can avoid these common mistakes, your business will likely continue to grow and be successful. What other mistakes have you seen small business owners make as their business grows?

The Top 5 Technologies Emerging for Smart Home Automation

Are your new tech devices changing you? Chances are, trending innovations in current and emerging technologies have got you on the edge of your seat. Things are changing so fast, it’s hard to believe that only 10 years ago it was still cool to open the garage with a remote control. No one could imagine adjusting the home thermostat from work by using a smartphone.

However, the widespread adoption of the Internet of Things (IoT) is really speeding things up. Cisco estimates that 50 billion devices will be connected to the IoT by 2020. The expanding empire of smart home automation is launching an exciting evolution of both connected devices and human interaction.

Smart homes employ a wide variety of electronic devices connected together on a home network communicating via the IoT. Currently, connected devices include thermostats, smoke and CO2 detectors, security cameras, smart locks, lighting, and A/V systems, including smart TVs and home cinema installations. Smart meters, energy storage systems for solar rooftops, and EV charging systems are also well on their way to assimilation into the IoT.

The top 5 emerging technologies

Emerging smart home connections can be logically predicted from the five top-selling devices in Consumer Technology Association’s (CTA) new report released in July. Driven by the rising adoption of IoT and broad enthusiasm for emerging technologies, sales of exciting new tech products are expected to reach $286.6 billion in 2016. Top-selling devices include virtual reality headsets, drones, wearable devices, 3D printers, and voice-activated digital assistants. While CTA focuses on the rise in 2016 sales revenues for these products, the products themselves indicate the path of today’s tech transition to home automation.

5. Digital assistant devices

Digital assistant devices provide cloud-based, voice-activated artificial intelligence. Imagine a future where assistants handle everything from digital filing, calendars, and to-do lists. Connecting all the family’s personal assistants could simultaneously sync everyone’s calendar, update the family schedule screen on the connected refrigerator, and send a message to a shiny, cool “Wake-Me” drone if wake-up calls are requested.

4. 3D printers

The expansion of 3D printers is running parallel with the explosion of imaginative applications. Connecting your 3D printer to your smart home will probably be more useful with time, but I can imagine printing drones or at least spare parts for the dishwasher. Connected ultrasound scans from your wife’s medical file might make a nice image of your pre-born baby, or at least a medical model of your in-grown toenail.

3. Wearables

Wearable—or fashionable—technology merges clothing or accessories with electronics, software, and connectivity to the IoT. Smartwatches are trendy, but fitness activity trackers are in the lead. Once connected to your smart home, your tracker’s data can be added to your medical files. You might even connect with a virtual coach to share the data via your digital assistant device.

2. Drones

The sky’s the limit when imagining all the great uses for personal drones, once they are connected to a smart home (and maybe a 3D printer). A “Wake-Me” drone might offer a variety of ways to wake everyone in their preferred manner. How about “Bruno the Guard Dog,” a loud, ferocious drone connected to the home security system. Or “Change-It,” a connected lighting support drone that knows when, where, and how to change a dead light bulb. A connected “Clean-It” drone could be deployed by the energy system if it detects solar panel performance slipping.

1. Virtual reality headsets

VR headsets wrap up home automation with a bow. Imagine your VR headset connected to “Bruno the Guard Dog Drone.” Go up on the roof with “Clean-It” and safely check out your entire solar installation for yourself. Work out, or review your fitness data with your online personal trainer in virtual reality. Or, if you’re really into VR, why not enter the IoT network itself, like Tron. Connect your buddy’s VR headset, too, and go together!

The exponential growth of IoT

Shawn DuBravac, PhD, is CTA’s chief economist. DuBravac believes that “the swath of emerging categories hitting the market in 2016 and the exponential growth of IoT are indelibly shaping the way we live our lives.”

CTA president and CEO Gary Shapiro concurs, stating, “This is a pivotal point in consumer technology history, as emerging tech categories—virtual reality, voice-controlled digital assistants, drones—push the entire industry forward.”

Regarding the exciting transformations that humans and technologies are simultaneously undergoing, DuBravac predicts, “How we use the Internet, and the new products coming to market today, are changing who we are becoming.”

How are your new tech toys changing you? Who are you becoming? Your answers probably predict the cool connections your future smart home will offer!

How to Stop Wasting Time and Start Seeing Results from Your DIY Small Business Marketing

As a small business owner, it can be hard to see what the best marketing channel is for your specific product. Everywhere you look, you see marketing “tactics” that will “explode your Twitter following overnight” or “start a viral movement.” Unfortunately, the majority of companies out there will see zero positive impact, and going viral is extremely difficult and not always a good thing.

So how do you find the best marketing campaigns for your small business that you can run?

Let me walk you through a simple and effective plan that will get you the business you need. Take 20 minutes and follow these simple steps.

Identify your customer’s problem

The first step is to identify the problem that your small business solves. You know your customers better than anyone, so try and get in their heads.

Take a few minutes and write down some common problems your customers have.

Here are three examples:

A family restaurant:

Problem: “I need a place where my family can eat that has reasonable prices, good atmosphere for kids, and good food.”

A mortgage broker:

Problem: “I don’t even know where to get a home loan and I’m worried I won’t understand the process when I do.”

A business accountant:

Problem: “Our company needs software that allows our accountants to work closely together so we can quickly and efficiently help our customers.”

Show the solution

The next step is to consider each one of the problems you wrote down, then write down two sentences that show how your business solves that particular problem. For example:

Problem: “Our company needs software that allows our accountants to work closely together so that we can quickly and efficiently help our customers.”

Solution: “Our innovative accounting software allows your team to work together quickly and effectively.”

Solution: “We’ve built a suite of tools to help your accountants work together on the same project in real time, saving you and your clients time and money.”

Also, consider looking through your customer testimonials or reviews for snippets that show how your business solves people’s problems. These can be the most effective messages you can share.

Now that you’ve got some good solid ad copy, run it by someone you trust to give you honest feedback. Don’t let your ego get in the way; make sure to listen to what they say. Make changes as necessary.

The last step is to find the best way to get your message in front of your audience. It’s important to recognize that one size does not fit all. If your clientele is small business across the nation, odds are you’re going to need to reach out to your customers on the Internet or through trade publications. If you’re local, it might be the newspaper or local Google ads.

The best way to find the right marketing channel is to determine where your customers are when they make the “decision.” For example, people frequently check Yelp for restaurants, so if you’re trying to find new customers, you may want to take out an ad in Yelp. If you’re a plumber, you may want to take out an ad in the local newspaper or put an ad on Craigslist.

Here’s a list of common marketing channels for small businesses: 

   •     Google AdWords
   •     Facebook ads
   •     Forum banner ads
   •     Bus stations
   •     Local newspapers and radio stations
   •     Yelp
   •     Craigslist
   •     Trade shows
   •     Magazines
   •     Local television

Now that you’ve got your copy and you have your channel, all you have to do is place the ad. Then, make sure to watch the results closely. If it’s not successful, consider changing the message or going with a different channel. Once you find an advertising campaign that works, it can bring profits for years to come.

What kind of success have you had running your own marketing campaigns for your small business? Reply in Comments below.

Captain Sully saved his life. Mozy saved his files.

You’ve probably heard about the new movie, Sully, the story that recounts US Airways Flight 1549 and Captain Chelsey “Sully” Sullenberger, the pilot who “landed” the Airbus A320 in New York’s Hudson River on January 15, 2009. Just after taking off from LaGuardia Airport, both of the aircraft’s engines were disabled after striking a flock of Canada geese. Realizing there wasn’t time to return to the airport, Captain Sully and his co-pilot Jeffrey Skiles made the decision to ditch the plane in the river. Miraculously, all aboard survived.

Although the “Miracle on the Hudson” is a story that’s known worldwide, there is a smaller, related story that’s not so well known. Businessman Paul Jorgensen was one of the passengers aboard Flight 1549 that day, and EMC was a small part of Jorgensen’s story. That day Jorgensen, a resident of Charlotte, North Carolina, was on his way home from New York to spend the weekend with his family. “January 15, 2009, started as a normal day for me,” Jorgensen remembers. A few minutes after takeoff, things changed. “I thought for sure we were going to die,” Jorgensen says. “I was convinced. I didn’t think we any chance at all to survive.”

Fortunately, Captain Sully’s quick thinking saved all aboard. The 150 passengers and 5 crew members were rescued that day, but personal property was all left behind in the damaged, sinking plane. “It never even occurred to me to grab my laptop or cell phone…or wallet…or keys before I got off the plane,” Jorgensen says.

Once safely back on solid ground, Jorgensen called his company’s IT department. “I’m without a laptop; you have to get me something,” he recalls. The next morning IT provided Jorgensen with a replacement laptop and all of his files as they had been backed up by Mozy from EMC. “I was shocked,” Jorgensen remembers, who says it would have taken him months to replace everything that was on his hard drive.

“Having the laptop delivered with my entire hard drive replicated exactly as I left it saved me literally months of time and hassle,” he says.

Jorgensen says that his experience on Flight 1549 is a reminder that we have very valuable files and “we just simply can’t afford to not back them up on a daily basis.” Today when Jorgensen tells people his story, “I like to say that Captain Sullenberger saved my life. MozyPro from EMC saved my laptop files.”

Tom Hanks plays the lead in “Sully.” It’s quite a performance, but he’s only acting. When it comes to data loss, that’s real. Jorgensen says that backing up valuable data is not a precautionary step to take lightly. “And it doesn’t have to be a plane crash to remind us of that,” he says. Fortunately, you can protect your valuable data with Mozy backup—without landing on the Hudson.

You can hear Paul Jorgensen share his dramatic story here.

Dell + Mozy have a lot in common with greatness!

Holmes and Watson. Batman and Robin. Han and Chewy. Jordan and Pippen. Milk and Cookies. What do all of these have in common? You guessed it; legendary partnerships who were better together. Any one of these individuals was pretty great on their own, but when paired with the other they were greater.

With that in mind, I’m happy to announce the forming of an extraordinary business partnership between Dell and EMC that’s destined for greatness. So maybe you’re asking yourself, “What does this have to do with Mozy?” The merger of Dell and EMC, owner of Mozy, is great news for you, our customer! Dell and Mozy share common values—starting with putting customers first. I’m excited by the opportunities created by Mozy joining Dell Technologies and its family of companies, and want to share my short list of why I think this is a great partnership, as well as what you can count on staying the same.

Complementary technologies

Dell makes world-leading desktops, laptops and servers, and Mozy provides an industry-leading solution for protecting the data on those systems in the cloud. These technologies together are sure to take “industry-leading” to another level. This one is a no-brainer.

Business fit

Dell provides Mozy with a massive new universe of customers in need of data protection. Don’t be surprised to see Mozy offered to Dell business and enterprise customers on new desktops and laptops. We look forward to the growth this partnership will bring, and the additional investment it will enable, which benefits you as a Mozy customer.

Emphasis on partners

Both Dell and Mozy wouldn’t be where they are today without the support of great partners. We expect this commitment to our partners to continue to grow and flourish as a result of this new partnership.

Some things will never change

So what isn’t changing? Our high quality, award-winning service and customer focus. Mozy is committed to our customers and partners for the long haul. We’ve spent years investing in a service you can trust with your most important information.

You’ll also notice a few positive subtle changes over the coming weeks and months. Stay tuned.

Like peanut butter and jelly.

 

Russ Stockdale is the General Manager at Mozy by Dell

6 Easy Tax Breaks for Small Businesses

To be a small business owner is to know how to save money. Small business owners have to be savvy with how they spend because they often have re-invest a lot of their profits back into building up their business, and profits and costs can vary dramatically.

One of the best ways you can save as a small business it to know the full extent of your available tax breaks. Before we delve into 10 of the easiest tax deductions for small businesses, make sure to review all tax-related information with a certified accountant or tax professional, as I am neither.

Home office expenses
If your team is a distributed workforce and you work from a home office, you can deduct your operating expenses. The IRS calls this “Business Use of Your Home.” It works like this:

   •     Calculate the percentage of your home office from the total          square footage of your house. The home office must be a sole          dedicated space to your business—a hobby craft room with a          desk in the corner technically doesn’t count.
   •     That home office percentage is also the percentage of all          utilities you can deduct, including electricity, gas, and Internet.
   •     Take your monthly statements or the yearly averages and          calculate the percentage.
   •     Half of all business dinners

If you regularly meet new or potential clients for dinner or drinks, you can deduct 50% of the amount you paid as a business expense. This is the case whether or not you’re traveling or in your home city.

New technology
Many people forget to deduct a portion of the new technology they buy because they also use it for personal use. The good news is you can deduct the cost of percentage of the item that you use for business. For instance, if you use your smartphone 50% of the time for business calls, email, or Skype IM chat, you can deduct 50% of the cost for a new one. This also goes for your Internet connection costs as well.

The same goes for computers, monitors, back-up batteries, cameras, and more. However, don’t be generous with the deductions—it’s not worth the IRS audit

Car leases or mileage
When deducting use of your personal vehicle for business, you have a few options. For a purchased car, you can deduct either by mileage or actual expenses, according to TurboTax.

Additionally, if you decide to lease your car instead of buy it, you can deduct the percentage use of lease payment (same as the technology example above). So, if you use your car 15% of the time for appointments, driving to clients, etc. you can deduct 15% of your car lease payments. You have to use the “actual expense” model as mentioned above to deduct lease payments.

Learning
If you regularly attend conferences, buy books directly related to your business and industry, or attend on-demand courses, you can deduct the related costs. This is a great way to stay relevant in your industry without worrying too much about the costs.

SaaS subscriptions
If you regularly have subscriptions to ongoing services that you use for business, you can deduct them. Some examples include:

   •     Computer virus protection
   •     Cloud file backup (for example, Mozy)
   •     Adobe Creative Cloud
   •     VPN for client security
   •     PayPal or credit card transaction fees

There are several other tax breaks for small businesses available. Get familiar with the IRS guidelines for business deductions and take advantage of as much as you legally can.

The Power and Impact of AES Encryption

In 2011, Ponemon Research released a study that shook the business and hacker community to their digital core. Out of 583 U.S. companies, 90 percent of respondents claimed their computers had been hacked at least once in a year. That’s terrible news for companies, but thrilling news for hackers who continue to find ways to illegally gain access to other people’s data. Unless an Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) is in place.

In 2014, half of American adults had experienced a computer hack. Even more worrisome, the estimated annual cost over global cybercrime is $100 billion, according to go-gulf.com. The number of hackers rising from behind their laptops is astronomical. But many hackers fear AES encryption, a common encryption technology used by the U.S. military that is now used worldwide. Besides the military, e-commerce websites, banks and hospitals use AES encryption to protect consumers and clients from a data breach. So far, there’s been no major or successful cryptanalytic attacks against AES, which protects classified information and encrypts sensitive data. But how did AES this come about?

The history

It all started with two Belgian cryptographers (a fancy word for the study of secret writing techniques) named Joan Daemen and Vincent Rijmen. They used cryptography algorithms, known as ciphers, and mathematic functions. No standards existed to promote a secure encryption algorithm until the Data Encryption Standard was published in 1977. However, the key size proved to be too small, leaving vulnerabilities and a painfully slow process. But the two cryptographers developed a symmetric block cipher (code used to conceal messages) comprised of three block ciphers, AES-128, AES-192 and AES-256.

The AES was adopted as industry standard by the U. S. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in 2001 after a three-year competition for the best encryption technique. Based off its creators’ names, AES is also called Rijndael.

What set AES apart? AES encrypts data with a secret key, and once decrypted, it uses the same secret key, but the operations are done in reverse. AES allows users to “hide” the relationship between an intended message and an encrypted message. Simply, it creates confusion. Depending on the block ciphers (AES-128, AES-192, AES-256), millions of different possible key combinations occur. Consider this number: AES-128 has more than 300,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 different key combinations.

Why do hackers fear AES encryption?

According to commsnetwork.com, it would one billion years for a “super-computer to crack the AES-128 algorithm using brute force.” To put it simply, AES encryption creates an unintelligible cipher block that leave hackers scratching their heads. Some officials, like Ozzie Diaz, president and CEO of AirPatrol, recognize the minor flaws in AES encryption, but still feel confident in the process.

“Can somebody repurpose and weaken the strength of the AES algorithm? Yes. That’s what cryptographers do,” he told TechNewsWorld in 2009. “But we don’t have to worry about AES being weakened anytime soon. Still, AES in theory has flaws. The bottom line is that AES isn’t broken.”

According to koftu.net, brute-forcing a 128-bit key using even the most advanced supercomputer would take 1.3 quadrillion years. Using a 256-bit key? It’s unfathomable to think how long it would take a cybercriminal to hack that!

Protecting Your Identity from Growing Cyber Crime Threats

In 2015 alone, 13.1 million Americans were victims of identity fraud. Even more shocking, identity fraudsters have stolen approximately $112 billion since 2009, which amounts to $35,600 stolen every minute. Thankfully, there are a wide variety of ways to protect your digital identity from the growing number of cybercrimes. These include shielding your keypad when entering important information, not using public Wi-Fi, using unique and different passwords for each website, and backing up your information in case of a ransomware attack. By following the guidelines in this infographic you can significantly increase your odds of not being a victim of cybercrime! Let us know in the comments how you are protecting your data.

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