Monthly Archives: February 2013

The Mozy Mac Client – Better and Better

Mozy for Mac is Improved!

In December we released Mac Client 2.9 and are very proud of the improvements made in this version and in the great community feedback we’ve gotten. The newest Mac Client includes:

  • Awesome performance increases
    • More courteous resource handling – if you’re running another process that needs more memory or CPU, Mozy automatically backs off until your system has less going on.
    • Large file CPU optimizations are much kinder to your Mac when backing up large files
    • Better file scanning so that a file won’t be re-uploaded for backup if only metadata changed
    • Pausing a backup is honored much more quickly
  • Day-by-day backup speed throttling.  Want to limit bandwidth use on weekdays?  No prob, Mac Client Settings let you control how much bandwidth Mozy uses on each day.
  • AES Encryption for all files encrypted with a private key – Mozy security gets better and better!
  • Mountain Lion Notification Center integration for backup notifications and updates.
  • Restore Search – the Mac Restore Client now lets you search for a particular folder or file in addition to the file system navigation options you’ve always enjoyed.

Hear directly from the developers! Listen to an interview with Lance Helsten, team lead on the Mozy for Mac developer team.
If you’re using a pre-2.9 release of the Mac Mozy client, you’re going to want to upgrade right away to enjoy all of these new features and performance enhancements.  Get it now at http://mozy.com/download/

When Earth Attacks – Protecting Your Data From Natural Disasters

When a natural disaster strikes, protecting your digital information can often be the last thing on your mind. Worrying about your own personal safety and that of your family and friends, as well as protecting or saving your possessions can take all of the time and energy you have available. Since your focus should (rightfully) be on helping those around you, important business information can be lost if not backed up.

Because natural disasters can be unexpected and surprising, protecting your business data is of critical importance. Data is near impossible to replace, and without it, many businesses can be completely wiped out by an act of God.

Online backup service providers like Mozy can protect your data by storing a copy of it in a data center. This infographic illustrates the disruptions that can occur when the status quo is changed, and tells the story of three different businesses that were able to rise up and recover from disasters quickly with the help of cloud backup.

 

A History of Natural Disasters

 

MozyPro Online Backup for Business

 

Encrypting/safeguarding your USB drives and removable media

USB flash and hard drives and removable media make it easy to carry data around – almost too easy. You can buy 16 GB drives for about $20 these days, and larger ones for not much more.

But with this convenience comes risk. If these items are lost or stolen, someone can have access to your data. Fortunately, some drives offer built-in encryption and free tools like TrueCrypt and Microsoft’s BitLocker To Go can safeguard your data and ensure that no one besides you can read your files. The encryption means that you need to enter a password before you open any of the files on the drive, otherwise all the data is just gibberish.

BitLocker To Go was introduced in Vista, but many users found it too difficult to setup and administer. It is much improved in Windows 7 and in Windows 8. Once you insert your USB drive in your computer, you right-click on the drive and start the BitLocker preparation process. You are asked for a password or a smartcard to protect the drive and where you want to store the recovery key information. It is simple and it just takes a few minutes to perform the encryption, depending on the size of the drive itself.

Note that if you want to read any of the files on your encrypted drive with older versions of Windows such as XP, you can’t.

You should see screens similar to ones the below when you want to decrypt the files on the drive.

Encrypting and Safeguarding USBs

Once you set up BitLocker To Go on a drive and a specific computer, you can set things so that it automatically decrypts the drive when it is inserted on that computer, which is a nice touch and makes things very easy to manage.

If you are responsible for your organization’s IT infrastructure and want to enable BitLocker across all the PCs in your company, you might want to review the group policies that are part of Windows here.

If you don’t use Windows, or if you want something more powerful and flexible, then TrueCrypt.org has free open source tools for Mac, Windows, and Linux machines. One of the features that I like is the ability to recover a forgotten password, which is probably the biggest fear in using any of these products. The Windows 7 BitLocker has this recovery feature too. Another feature is that you can encrypt a portion of your hard drive, where BitLocker needs to encrypt the entire drive.

If you want something more powerful than simple password protection, you can link the encryption technology to the Trusted Computing Module chip, (see this video here on TPM) or make use of the built-in fingerprint reader; both are part of most modern Windows laptops.

 

MozyHome Online Backup

 

Super Bowl Blackouts and Online Backup

 If you were one of the millions of people who tuned into the Super Bowl last night, you saw a great football game, 55 commercials, Beyoncé’s half time show and, most unexpectedly, a 34 minute delay due to a loss of power at the Superdome in New Orleans, Louisana.

The Superdome had been selected as the site for the 2013 Super Bowl (Super Bowl XLVII) in 2009. Preparations for this game have been in the works for years. The Superdome is also the regular season home to the NFL’s New Orleans’ Saints, and is no stranger to hosting impressive sporting events, having play host to boxing matches, basketball games, soccer games, gymnastics meets and countless other gatherings.

Super Bowl XLVII

The power outage (currently being blamed on an ‘abnormality’ in the Superdome power system) became one of the main talking points of this version of the Super Bowl a hotly contested 34-31 win for the Baltimore Ravens over the San Francisco 49ers.

Even with all of the preparation that went into hosting the biggest football game of the year, something went wrong. This is a good reminder that something can go wrong at any time, and usually when you least expect it. The only way to prepare for something like this is to make sure that the things are the most important or irreplaceable are protected.

Whether it’s a house fire or a a flooding river, we’ll all likely experience our own “power outages” – make the right choice and make sure that your data is safe and protected, backed up online.

Image Credit: 2013 Super Bowl XLVII / RMTip21 / CC BY 2.0