Monthly Archives: March 2014

Journey of the Hard Drive

The life of a hard drive

We’ll handle HIPAA and PHI, but you make the APPT at the DR

These days, you’ve probably heard plenty about health insurance and affordable health care. But have you ever heard of PHI?

What, you don’t know what PHI is? You should. After all, you’ve got it. It has to do with your health, but it’s no disease. PHI, or “protected health information,” is the information your healthcare provider keeps on file as a result of your visits to your general practitioner, gynecologist, psychologist, dentist, psychiatrist, counselor, the emergency room, etc. It’s your personal health information. It’s detailed and it’s private.

Did you know that Mozy plays a critical part for those professionals who work in healthcare—be they doctors, nurses, administrators, and other staff members—by providing security measures for the protected health data and files about you that they back up?

You’ve probably heard the term “HIPAA,” and maybe you’ve even wondered if it’s some species of wild animal. HIPAA is the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. The act sets the standard for protecting sensitive patient data in the United States. Any business that stores health information is required by law to protect it. Businesses must ensure that all of the required physical, network, and process security measures are in place and followed so that your health information remains protected.

As a provider of HIPAA-compliant backup services that safeguard health information, Mozy ensures that health information is protected in a way that complies with HIPAA regulations. Mozy software and services ensure that the appropriate safeguards are in place so that the businesses that back up health information have the tools to keep it confidential and secure. That means encryption keys are required and that data must be encrypted during the backup process. That same data must be encrypted at rest while it’s stored in Mozy’s data centers (only the ones in the United States as required by HIPAA). What that means is that those who are not authorized to access protected health information cannot access it.

Whether or not it’s protected health information or any data that businesses back up, or files that you back up at home, Mozy provides automated cloud backup and disaster recovery protection against hardware failure, theft, virus attack, deletion, and natural disaster.

If you don’t work in healthcare, you might consider some of these details boring. But remember this: your personal healthcare information is yours—and it’s private. And Mozy takes the details to protect your data very seriously so that you can focus on other things.

The intricacies of HIPAA may be complicated, but our commitment to you and your data is simple and based on these principles:

•    Your information is your information, not our information.
•    We never sell your information to anyone, nor do we sell information about you.
•    We never sift through your information in order to create a profile of you or target advertising.
•    You can always get your information back while your account is active. We have no rights to your information if you leave the Mozy service.

So, whether it’s your health information at your doctor’s office or it’s your family photos or tax documents on your home computer, Mozy can protect it.

By the way, when was your last checkup?

What does ‘enterprise-ready’ mean?

What makes a cloud service “enterprise ready”? Is it enterprise pricing models? An enterprise sales team? An enterprise mentality?

As more and more cloud service providers look to target enterprises with their offerings, the “enterprise-ready” question becomes increasingly important. The ‘third platform’ (adopting cloud-based apps instead of traditional server-based solutions) is gaining traction within big business, as expected. But how do they find out which solutions are truly built to meet their needs?

What does enterprise ready mean?

At Mozy, we take our enterprise credentials seriously. Sure, we offer a product that’s so simple to use that millions of individuals trust us with their data protection. But we also have more than one hundred thousand businesses and one thousand enterprises who choose Mozy to protect their data.

Why? Well, at Mozy, we believe that being enterprise ready is something that needs to permeate the whole of our business. It means building world-class data centers that run on enterprise-grade hardware. It means offering enterprise-level security at all stages of the backup process. It means offering enterprise-quality support with dedicated resources 24x7x365. It means enterprise control and administrative tools. It means being a part of EMC, a global leader in data protection and availability solutions. It means a hundred different things, not least of which is a commitment to excellence in compliance.

That’s why Mozy has long made SOC 1 SSAE 16 Type II examination and ISO 27001 certification a priority. Mozy is one of the only cloud data protection service providers to undertake these rigorous independent security assessments. This sort of compliance exercise is completely voluntary and not something to be entered into lightly – we see it as a badge of honor and an external validation of our commitment to you, our valued customer.

So, what does ‘enterprise-ready’ mean? It means thinking at every turn about what enterprises need and going the extra mile to provide it. Or, that’s what we think anyway. Tell us what you think in the comments below.

The State of the Modern Meeting

Business owners and professionals can come together on at least one idea about meetings: While nobody loves to take them, everybody agrees that face-to-face time is a key value to the conference-room setting for meetings. Companies are increasingly looking for effective ways to provide that face-to-face opportunity–even when one of those faces is far apart from the other.

Indeed, the circumstances around “face time” are changing.

The State of the Modern Meeting

A new Blue Jeans Network survey shows that while 71% of polled professionals believe they’ve lost a business deal because their personal contact with a client or partner was replaced by conference calls and all-audio environments, some 30% are now using online tools to create video meetings that can in turn replace the physical conference room.

“This new way to collaborate means that bad weather, budget cuts, holidays and a geographically scattered team are no longer threats to business productivity,” said Stu Aaron, chief commercial officer at Blue Jeans. “You can easily conduct face-to-face meetings with nearly any browser-based device — from any location.”

The Blue Jeans Network survey offers additional insight into the state of the modern meeting and the changes business conferences will undergo in 2014.

Meeting Modern: Trends and Technology

A number of trends are affecting the meeting milieu.

  • In 2013, winter storms resulted in more meetings rather than fewer–some 20% more. Meetings simply became online conferences instead of in-office meet-ups.
  • One-third of all meetings now include participants who are appearing via mobile devices. New York holds the title for most mobile meeters, with San Francisco, Los Angeles, Chicago, and Houston close behind.
  • Mobile is driving a change in meeting times, as well. Three times the conferences via mobile devices are now happening at 7 a.m. versus 8 a.m., or at 6 p.m. instead of 5 p.m.
  • Meetings on Saturdays and Sundays declined by more than one-third in the last half of 2013–from one in 10 meetings occurring on the weekend to just one in 15. Tuesdays and Wednesdays are the most popular meeting days of the week.
  • The traditional lunch hour is also improving, at least in terms of how many times meetings intrude upon it. The polls shows a 20% dip in conferences scheduled between 12 noon and 1 p.m.

The survey also revealed another interesting statistic: While 41% of meetings begin on time, the survey stated, CEOs, CTOs, and other C-level execs typically arrive after everyone else.

The more things change, the more they stay the same.

 

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How Small Businesses Can Avoid Common Hiring Missteps

Small Business InterviewHiring a new employee can be stressful–especially for a small business. Get it right, and you improve the productivity and profitability of the company. Get it wrong, and it can end up costing the company dearly–in time, money and, potentially, reputation.

While there is always an element of the unknown when making a new hire, there are some tried-and-true guidelines that organizations can follow to make the process go as smoothly as possible.

  1. Your ‘gut’ isn’t a hiring manager. Your intuition can be a powerful force, but, when it comes to hiring, gut feelings should not drive your decision-making process. Rely more on work samples and references and less on a candidate’s charisma.
  2. Favors to friends and family won’t do you any favors. Cousins, nephews, buddies and next-door neighbors–keep all these individuals in their place. Due to emotional ties and the complications that come with friendships, bringing personal and family relations into the workplace can be a recipe for trouble if things don’t go well on the job.
  3. Not every great candidate is a great small-business candidate. The stellar designer whose last job was in a shiny office tower with 10 times the resources your small business can provide might not be the right fit. Problems arise when a new hire has all the right qualifications and skills, but also has expectations that are torqued to a big-business kind of horsepower. Be clear with your candidates about the nature of a small business — your small business. Be specific about its atmosphere and limitations, and also its charms. How a candidate responds can tell you a lot about how he or she will fit into a small-shop experience.
  4. Listen more than you speak. You feel strongly about your business and love talking about it, but it’s important when interviewing a job candidate to listen more than speak. Market the pros of your company and provide all pertinent information, but then stop talking for as long as you can and open your mind to what the potential employee has to say. Watch the candidate’s body language and seek out tones, textures and all the little things that will develop your impression of how this person’s skills and background match up with how they present themselves and who they probably really are.
  5. Beware of illegal questions: Small-business owners may not have a human resources department or even an HR specialist on board, so they have to learn themselves what is and isn’t OK to ask during a job interview. Stay away from questions about things like pregnancy, marital status or age. Basically, avoid any questions whose answers could be perceived as placing a candidate at a disadvantage.

The good news is that successful hiring comes down mostly to common sense. Pay attention to these tips and then start fielding your best bets with the confidence that you’re about to find the right person for the job — and that you’re going about it by making all the right moves yourself.

 

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My name is Kris and I work for Mozy

Welcome back to another edition of our “My name is…” series – this blog series is dedicated to introducing you to some of our in-house talent, the talent that keeps the Mozy running. There is no question that we are very fortunate to be able to work with intelligent, compassionate people from around the globe.

This month we’d like to introduce you to Kris Meulemans, one of our EMEA senior Cloud Systems Engineers. Kris spends his time helping customers, sales teams and many others to spread the Mozy love. Kris has been instrumental in helping our EMEA customers with familiarizing themselves with the awesomeness that is Mozy. I know that Kris has helped me with many requests over the months and has always been extremely accommodating.

My name is Kris and I work for Mozy

I define my workspace as …
Whatever bit of space I can put my laptop down on, although I do love my double screen set up.

A device I can’t live without …
My mp3 player – although a snazzy laptop that boots in no time is a close second.

When I arrive at work, I typically start off by …
Saying hi to my colleagues, discussing any hot issues over a coffee and getting started into my email.

My work routine is …
Never the same and always as efficient as possible due to the many hats I wear during a day. Prioritize, run emails through the do, delegate, delete routine and have regular coffees to keep up with ‘the pulse’. That’s if I’m not travelling somewhere.

I do/do not listen to music at work and it helps me work better because …
I definitely do, my headset is on most of the times. In a nearly open plan office with people on the phone all around me it’s the only way to get and stay in ‘the zone’.

The best advice I can give a recent college graduate looking to do what I do is …
Learn as much as possible in any way possible. Your degree is an entry key; the rest comes down to constantly adapting and continuously improving what you do. If you see problems, fix them.

Outside of work, I am passionate about …
My family and friends, Saltimbocca and music. There are many stories attached to the second, suffice to say that any Italian restaurant can be judged by it.
Author’s note: I will have to agree with Kris on this statement – Saltimbocca is definitely at the top of my list for Italian favorites. Oh the deliciousness that is Italian fare…

My eating habits are …
Quality first, as much as possible with friends and always ending with a good coffee.

If I could be someone for a day – I would be …
A drummer on tour with a world famous band.

The “secret sauce” that makes me who I am …
The exactly measured recipe combining techie consultancy, project management, general fixing of things, listening, coaching, strategic thinking and a special secret selection of spices.
Author’s note: Well put, Kris!