The timeline of computer processor speed

In 1943 IBM’s president said that the world market for computers was only five!  If he were around today he would be amazed at the progression of speed in the computer processor.  Take a look at this infographic that details the progression of processor speed from the first transistor computer to the XBox One.

 

Data commute does not compute!

Look around any office today and you’re likely to see a wheeled laptop bag parked beside many of the desks.  Why the wheels?  Well, we’re all carrying more than just a laptop.  There’s likely to be a tablet and a big-screened smartphone in there too – along, perhaps, with an external hard drive, a couple of USB keys and maybe even a sandwich.

The thing is, we’re carrying so many data devices with us nowadays that we can’t… well ‘carry’ them anymore.

That set us to wondering how much data is actually being toted around by commuters every day.  And had us guessing how safe that data is too.  So much is said about the amount of data on the “Information Superhighway” but so little has been said about data on the *actual* highway.

We took on the task of finding out and, for the first time, we’re lifting the lid on the true scale of the data drain caused by laptops, smartphones, USB drives and hard drives carried by modern commuters in New York, San Francisco, London, Paris, Berlin and Munich

The results are pretty shocking:

    • The average commuter takes 470GB of company data home with them at the end of every day
    • That’s 2,500 times the amount of data they’ll move across the internet in the same timeframe
    • Every day, 1.4 exabytes of data moves through New York City alone – that’s more data than will cross the entire internet in        a day
    • As much as 33.5PB of data will travel over the Oakland Bay Bridge every day
    • As much as 49 PB of data will travel through the Lincoln Tunnel each day
    • Up to 328PB of data travels in the London Tube network every day
    • Up to 69PB of data leaves Munich’s Hauptbahnhof on a daily basis
    • The Paris Metro carries as much as 138PB of data every day
    • With 41.33% of people having lost a device that stores data in the past 12 months, huge amounts of business data is put at        risk every rush hour

The thing is, there isn’t a CIO we know who would risk sending massive volumes of data over the internet without protecting it first.  But businesses in New York alone send more data home with employees than is transmitted across the internet globally every day – and the levels of protection applied to that data can be extremely light.

A thief holding up a New York subway car at rush-hour capacity could walk away with over 100TB of data.  Though, of course, what’s more likely is that they’ll run off with a single commuter’s bag – but even that could have a big impact on the business they work for if it doesn’t have another copy of the data on their laptop.

It’s not just large volumes of data that we carry with us, it’s also the most-critical data; the edits to the contract that we’ve just worked through in today’s meeting, the presentation that we’re giving tomorrow morning, the tax forms that you’re halfway through filling in.  Losing this data can have an immediate impact on a company’s success.

The data drain from our cities at the end of the working day could be a real issue for businesses – but it doesn’t have to be.  Backing up data on mobile devices has never been easier – gone are the days of devices needing to be connected to a corporate network in order to protect them.

But many businesses still fail to prioritize endpoints in their data protection strategies because they’ve not realized the extent of the vulnerability issue that mobility has caused or the ease with which they can protect themselves.

To see more details on where the data drains from our cities, check out our heat maps.

 

Frightful Computer Haiku Contest v4.0

Did you just feel someone—or something!—tapping you on your shoulder? That’s just a scary reminder that it’s time for this year’s Frightful Computer Haiku Contest. It kind of just creeps up on you, doesn’t it? Well, we wouldn’t have it any other way. After all, there’s no better time of the year than Halloween to create a scary computer haiku. The more clever, the better. A $50 gift card will be awarded to each of three individuals with the most frightful computer haikus.

Maybe you’ve forgotten how to write a haiku. No worries; it’s not difficult.

Haikus are composed of three lines. Simply follow this frightfully foolproof formula to create your haiku: Line one is five syllables. Line two is seven syllables. And line three is five syllables. Haikus that do not meet the 5-7-5 criteria will be disqualified and fed to the werewolves.

If you need a little more help, perhaps last year’s winning haiku will get your creative juices flowing (Dracula is already salivating):

Great-Grandma’s pictures–

Gone–but now back from the dead!

Wish she was back, too.

Oooo, does that not send shivers up your spine?

The winning haikus will be featured on our Facebook page and Twitter account.

To enter, simply comment on this post with your frightful computer haiku.

Frightful Computer Haiku Contest Rules:

-Your haiku must be original. Don’t just copy one of the ones someone submitted last year (or this year), because that’s just lame. Our gaggle of goblins will be keeping an eye on you to ensure compliance.

-Your haiku must be awesome, but that goes without saying.

-One entry per person. Please do not submit the same haiku over and over again because that too is lame and aggravates the judges.

-Submit your haiku by October 31, 11:59 p.m. MDT in the comments below. The winners will be announced on Friday, November 3.

That’s it! Pretty easy, right? So get your haiku on and submit away! Like this contest? Click here to tweet it!

Malware is one more reason to back up your data

It’s National Cyber Security Awareness Month! But it’s not only October when you need to be aware of the critical need to back up and protect your data.

We’ve seen enough security breaches this year to recognize that malware can hit just about any business at any time. Consumer credit card data has been particularly vulnerable. And based on almost daily news stories, malware will continue to attack bank accounts and corporate assets around the world in attempts to steal valuable data.

Just how pervasive are these threats to our data, be it personal, business, or even governmental? The onslaught of malware is so pervasive that one expert has described the malicious software as being almost a commodity.

“Malware, once purpose-built, is clearly becoming a flexible platform—in many respects, it is now almost a commodity,” says Trusteer CTO Amit Klein in his blog.

Klein adds, “Not surprisingly, malware is still the most dangerous threat to enterprises, end users and financial institutions.”

In its 2014 Threats Predictions Report, McAfee Labs forecasts that, among other threats, PC and server attacks will target vulnerabilities above and below the operating systems; and cloud-based corporate applications will create new attack surfaces.

Let’s take a look at those two threats as highlighted in the McAfee Labs report.

New PC and server attacks will target vulnerabilities above and below the operating system: According to McAfee Labs, although “many cybercriminal syndicates will turn their attention to mobile devices, others will continue to target PC and server platforms. The new attacks we’ll see in 2014 will, however, not simply attack the operating system, but will also exploit vulnerabilities both above and below the OS.”

Deployment of cloud-based corporate applications will create new attack surfaces that will be exploited by cybercriminals: “Cybercriminal gangs of the 21st century will target cloud-based applications and data repositories because that’s where the data is, or will be soon enough,” according to the McAfee Labs report. “This could be through business applications that have not been assessed by IT against corporate security policies. According to a recent report, more than 80% of business users use cloud applications without the knowledge or support of corporate IT.”

So, what’s the solution? What can you do to protect your data? M-O-Z-Y.

Mozy endpoint and remote office data protection delivers effective data protection and business continuity in a way that increases reliability and consistency, while at the same time the solution significantly reduces IT costs and ongoing maintenance and support efforts. Mozy’s strict security policies, military-grade encryption (including default, personal, and corporate encryption keys), and world-class data centers deliver the availability, security, privacy, and compliance needed for optimal protection of your business and personal data in the cloud.

Although most of us like to think we’re immune from data loss, the truth is that without secure backup and protection of our data, malware can be a serious problem for even the most careful individual or business. With Mozy, your information is always encrypted during the backup process and while stored in our data centers. The security of your data is Mozy’s highest priority.

Malware may be a commodity, but with Mozy you can rest assured that your data is safe, protected, and securely accessible in the Mozy cloud.

The real reason Mozy is #1

Wherever you seek out information about protecting and storing data, there is plenty of noise about the cloud. Not about whether the cloud is an important part of a data protection strategy. That’s a given; the cloud isn’t going anywhere. It’s as firmly tied to technology as technology is tied to information. The noise is about whether the Mozy cloud is better or whether their cloud is better.

Recently, one of our salespeople shared some interesting—though not unexpected—news about a global market research firm whose employees use the Mozy by EMC solution and another company’s product (which will remain unnamed) to back up and access their data.

Mozy came out on top. The other company was dropped.

Let’s talk about the why.

This global market research firm that chose Mozy by EMC is all about data. Everything it does revolves around data collection. They use the data they gather to connect their clients with their target markets. That data must drive business. And that data must be protected and accessible, anytime and from anyplace.

There were a number of reasons why this marketing research firm decided to dump one backup solution and rely on Mozy to fully safeguard its data. The following are a few of the reasons.. And for the record, these are the company’s reasons for sticking with Mozy.

Mozy by EMC offers enterprise-grade integration tools: The other company’s integration tools were lacking. Mozy integrates to any LDAP-capable directory service—such as Active Directory—for secure, automated user provisioning, and management. We have to be integrated! Mozy scales to complete data protection from a single person to tens of thousands of devices in the enterprise.

Mozy by EMC offers detailed reporting: When the other company’s backup fails, a simple report indicates that and not much else. Mozy’s backup status feature monitors your system continuously to inform you of any issue that might interrupt the protection of your data. Mozy reports ensure that you know the status of your backups so that you can react quickly and solve an issue before it becomes a problem. In fact, in addition to detailed reporting, the feature-rich Mozy Admin Console has more than 130 features that allow admins to perform their duties in ways that work best for them, and it utilizes pooled storage, which eliminates the need to manage storage at a device level. That virtually eliminates the risk of failed backups.

Mozy by EMC means better support: The other company’s support was sub-standard at best. Mozy, on the other hand, provides enterprise-quality support with dedicated resources 24x7x365 in multiple languages. The Mozy Community lets you discuss issues, watch tutorials, and find and share solutions with users from all over the world. The Mozy Knowledge Base includes answers to just about every question you might have. And there’s a full range of documentation. Sure, we could mention that Mozy has award-winning support. OK, we will. Maybe you didn’t know that Mozy Support was a winner of a 2014 Stevie Award for legendary support. But that’s really just icing on the cake. The long and short of it is this: There’s a broad range of Mozy resources that can help you maximize everything that Mozy can do for your organization.

Mozy is a mature offering: We aren’t going anywhere. The other company just didn’t measure up. You might call them a newcomer when compared to how long we’ve been around (since 2005). Mozy is backed by years of experience, and wholly owned by EMC. Mozy is built for the enterprise with the flexibility to scale to any size business. We store data in world-class, EMC managed data centers.

Mozy is a proven solution for implementations of from 1 to 1 million endpoints. We take our credentials seriously. And so do millions of individuals and thousands of businesses and enterprise customers, including a global market research firm.

And while any cloud backup solution can claim just about anything with the right amount of marketing spin, it’s the customer who knows best.

My name is Angela and I work for Mozy.

 

Angela has been a great asset for Mozy for many years. She has worked different positions in support and has won much internal recognition for her excellent work ethic. Angela is irreplaceable, and after reading her answers below, I’m sure you will agree.

I define my workspace as…

My workspace is a cubicle in our Pleasant Grove office. While I love work-at-home days because I don’t have to commute to work, I find I really miss the multiple monitors and computers I have to work with when I’m sitting at my work desk. It really makes life easier! I also have a little personal touch in my cubicle, such as my Doctor Who calendar, some KCS (Knowledge Centered Support) awards I’ve won, the Mozy data shuttle astronaut, and a cute little vinyl Maleficent my coworker gave me.

A device I can’t live without….

While I hate to admit that I’m so connected, I’d have to say it’s my iPhone because it has everything I need in one convenient little package: my music, my eBooks, Internet, and social media. It’s also often the only link to my social life when I’m balancing work and school and my only free time is filled with homework and what little sleep I can find.

When I arrive at work, I typically start my day off by…

When I arrive at work the first thing I do is head to the break room to get water for the morning while my computers boot up, then I like to sit down and enjoy a cup of coffee while I start by checking in on internal company emails and then customer replies from the day before.

My work routine is…

Check internal emails, work on customer reply cases, work on new customer cases that are awaiting response, follow up with any customers who I haven’t heard from in more than three days, and then repeat. I also like to find time to create Knowledge Base articles when the queue is light or empty.

I do/do not listen to music at work and it helps me work better because …

I prefer listening to music at work. Once I get “in the zone” with my cases, the music helps drown out all the background noise the rest of the office is making so that I don’t lose focus. It also helps that I don’t generally get interrupted if people see my headphones on! The best music to encourage productivity for me has been French music, such as Christophe Mae, Zaz, and Stromae. However, I find that listening to audio books or podcasts are equally as awesome during my work flow AND I’m gaining new information.

The best advice I can give a recent college graduate looking to do what I do is …

Learn or improve your interpersonal skills and try not to take anything too seriously. While working in Support isn’t the ideal of most people, I really enjoy interacting with customers, especially when you can help them retrieve something important like their thesis that they’ve spent three years working on or the photos from their child’s first steps. Those things matter, and so you have to have some compassion for those times when people need a little extra care. Computer crashes can be so frustrating, and sometimes it’s hard not to take that out on a Support representative, even though it’s not personal. When that happens, you just need to remind yourself that it’s not about you, and then be as helpful as possible.

Outside of work, I am passionate about …

Writing is probably my main passion. Currently, I’m going to school and have dreams of one day being a renowned author. I also maintain 2 to 3 blogs (author’s note: check out Angela’s handy work at http://www.mysocalledchaos.com). I am also passionate about learning French, volunteering with a local animal rescue, and spending quality time with those who are important to me.

My eating habits are …

I try to eat healthy and I love getting fresh produce from the Farmer’s Market, but I will admit I’ll drop all calorie counting if you invite me out for Sushi or a bowl of pho.

If I could be someone for a day – I would be …

One of my colleagues in Ireland. I mean, hey, they’re in Ireland! When they complete their workday they get to look at all that green, and then walk down to the pub for a proper pint! ;)

The “secret sauce” that makes me who I am …

Probably the fact that I genuinely care about people and their lives. Being empathetic is perfect in my personal relationships with friends and family, but I find it’s also perfect when you work in Customer Service. I genuinely am happy for customers who are able to save their data, and genuinely sad when I hear some of the reasons they need to run their restores. When I hear how glad a customer is to have Mozy, it makes me happy.

One thing that makes me unique is….

My eclectic interests. I like to try most hobbies once, so if you visited my home you’d find an entire closet full of all the various things I’ve done and keep because I hope to get around to them again one day. Crochet, wood burning, oil painting, web design, photography, a musical instrument or two, etc. One day I’ll be able to do any hobby I want. Also, I want to be able to speak multiple languages. I’m working on French, and then hopefully I’ll start learning a third!

 

Interested in a career at Mozy?  Check out which positions are available at http://mozy.com/about/careers

Progression of football in video games

Did you know that September 12 is Video Games Day? Be sure to take some time to enjoy your favorite video game today. Until then, take a look at our infographic, The Progression of Football, to see if your favorite football game is among those that revolutionized the gaming industry.

 

Free MozyHome Online Backup

Lots of memories in a wooden bat

 

While growing up in Southern California I played four years of Little League Baseball. For me, nothing said baseball more than a Louisville Slugger baseball bat. A wooden Louisville Slugger, of course. It wasn’t as if we had a choice back then; in those days, a bat was only made out of wood.

I hadn’t really thought much about bats in recent years until my boss returned from Kentucky. He was visiting Louisville Slugger. He got to hold bats made for The Sultan of Swat (Babe Ruth), Jackie (Jackie Robinson), and The Splendid Splinter (Ted Williams). Actually, Ted Williams was so great a hitter that he was also known as “The Greatest Hitter Who Ever Lived.”

Dave, our marketing guru, is a lucky guy to be sure. Who doesn’t want to hold the bat of “The Greatest Hitter Who Ever Lived” or the bat of “The Great Bambino” or the bat of Jackie, the first African-American to play in Major League Baseball and who broke barriers in more fields than just baseball? But lucky us to be protecting the data of Louisville Slugger who made bats for all of those great hitters and continues to make bats for many of today’s great hitters.

Mozy backs up the data of the makers of the Louisville Slugger. That’s a win-win in my book.

The Louisville Slugger has been around a long time. Long enough for my dad to have used the bat, though not always for the right reasons. I remember him telling stories about growing up in San Francisco and knocking down advertising signs along Taraval all the way to the dunes with a bat as a youngster. I know, not the best reason for swinging a bat. But he redeemed himself long ago by becoming a rocket scientist and working closely with the Apollo Space Program. And teaching my brother and me the finer points of playing baseball and the proper use of a Louisville Slugger.

I still remember those batting fundamentals that my dad was always drilling into my head and my older brother’s head:

-The label goes up!

-Hands together—and line up the knuckles!

-Don’t break the wrists!

And, of course:

-Keep your eye on the ball!

Always keep your eye on the ball. That made such an impression on me that I can hear those words today as if I were hearing them for the first time. When I followed that rule and the others, and when I managed to hit the ball on the sweet spot on that wooden bat, the sound was enough to tell me that fielders were gonna be moving—and I’d better be hustling my way to first base.

Although memories tend to intensify our experiences from years ago—for better or for worse—I can remember that I was just an average ball player who never batted above .200. But I loved the game, and some of my choicest memories are playing catcher and feeling the sting of a fast ball popping in my glove, watching my brother pitch against future Hall of Famer Robin Yount, and knowing that my dad was logging stats in the announcer’s box.

Throughout my life, I have strived to “keep my eye” on life’s proverbial baseball. That has helped me to focus in spite of life’s distractions and disappointments. In some ways, I suppose I’ve succeeded from what I learned by focusing on those batting fundamentals, which for me really come down to three words: focus, focus, focus. If it’s important enough, you’ll focus on it. Looking back, playing baseball certainly taught me more about life than I ever could have appreciated as a youngster.

Say what you want about the financial benefits of the aluminum bat, but there’s nothing like the wood of a Louisville Slugger. And there’s nothing better than good memories, except making tomorrow’s memories today. So, keep your eye on the ball. Good things are bound to happen, including those few but wonderful moments when you hit one out of the park.

See why Louisville Slugger uses Mozy by EMC. http://mozy.com/product/testimonials/louisville-slugger

For more baseball, check out our infographic Social Media at the Old Ball game.

When good vibrations led to touchdowns

I remember it well, that electrifying experience of watching 22 plastic players vibrate on the field as my brother and I screamed at our players to do anything even remotely resembling what occurs in real gridiron football. If you were offense, you screamed even louder, wishing against all wishes, hoping against all hope that your team would make a coordinated and vibrated effort to move the ball closer to the end zone.

Truthfully, there wasn’t any coordination, but there was plenty of loud buzzing as your 11 team members vibrated wildly down the field—or up the field or across the field or in tight circles anywhere on the field, depending on the unpredictable characteristics of the shiny metal turf. Would there be a touchdown this time? Please, let there be a touchdown, just this once!

I’m talking about Electric Football. My brother and I were having fun with this game sometime in the mid-1960s, long enough ago that today’s gamers with their Madden NFL 15 or other digital football games might find it hard to imagine that little plastic men in undistinguishable uniforms could be propelled to glory by an electrical charge.

 Although we had options like punting or kicking field goals, they were just as likely to fail as was the man with the little felt football that was on a vibrating path that hopefully ended in the promised land. The right promised land, that is.

And speaking of field goals, in Electric Football, each team included a plastic phenom with a catapult leg that was capable of “kicking” the puny pigskin through the goal posts, and even way beyond the boundaries of the stadium. But unless you were lucky or highly skilled with these kickers, the only play resembling an actual field goal would be my brother or me flicking a player through the goal posts out of frustration because the ball carrier vibrated up the field for a touchback when he should have vibrated down the field for a touchdown. I remember there being a lot of touchbacks, but far fewer than there were players just vibrating off the field as if they’d lost their desire to play.

Times have changed, of course. Mine and my brother’s Electric Football game is long gone (though you can still find versions of it for sale on eBay). Consider that early versions of Electric Football used solid-color plastic players to represent whatever team you favored. That worked great, as long as you didn’t mind an all-yellow team). Yesterday’s teams were comprised of 3D unknowns without statistics or college pedigree. Today’s games emulate the actions of professional athletes. In fact, Madden NFL 15 pulls game updates throughout the real NFL season and updates player ratings in the game.

But maybe times haven’t changed as much as technology has. Sure, with Madden NFL 15 games can be saved in the cloud and synced to other devices, but it’s still just a game. Win or lose, it can be a lot of fun. And it allows us to compete in a game whose outcome can never be fully predicted. Likewise, it allows us to keep things in perspective, unlike the old days when you could flick a player across the field and through the goalposts for an extra point.

Be sure to read Mozy’s blog next week. It will feature an infographic about the progression of the football video game. From plastic and metal to LED blips, to trackball to showboating and even late hits, we can still enjoy the game without turning on the TV.

Data transfer speeds VISUALIZED

As the internet has become a common part of the world, it has become easy to take for granted just how fast that information is transferred.  Perhaps a comparison between some other things that are notoriously quick can grant some perspective.