Blog Archives

In the path of Hurricane Matthew?

With the approach of Hurricane Matthew, we here at Mozy hope that you and your loved ones are safe. As you do whatever you can to protect your home, business and belongings, don’t neglect to protect other important assets, ones that are often neglected in the ensuing panic of an impending natural disaster—your data.

Whether it’s important tax documents or irreplaceable digital photographs on your home computer, or business-critical files on desktops and laptops that you rely on to conduct your business, be sure your data is backed up so that in the event that your files are lost or damaged they can be quickly recovered.

For important tips about protecting your data, visit the Mozy Community blog.

From all of us at Mozy, be safe!

It’s time for Mozy’s Frightful Computer Haiku Contest!

What might be the real fright of this announcement is that it’s already October! Nevertheless, it’s time once again for our Frightful Computer Haiku Contest, version 6.0. Last year’s contest was such a success that we had to do this again. All you have to do to enter is to write a scary computer haiku (according to the rules), submit it, and you could win a $200 gift card (1st place), a $50 gift card (2nd place), or a $25 gift card (3rd place). This is one of our most popular contests.

The rules are simple:

   •     Your haiku must be original. In other words, plagiarizing a          haiku will get you disqualified faster than you can werewolf          down a piece of your favorite pumpkin pie.

   •     Your haiku must be awesome. You know, like “Green Bay just          won the Super Bowl!”

   •     One haiku per person. That means one (“1”), not two (“2”). Two          or more will get you disqualified (and it might even affect what          you get for Christmas).

   •     Submit your haiku by October 31, 11:59 p.m. MDT in the Comments section below.

The winners will be announced in our November newsletter and in a November blog.

If you don’t remember how to create a haiku, the following should help. Haikus are composed of three lines. Line one is five syllables, line two is seven syllables, and line three is five syllables. M. Neal’s winning submission from last year is a good example of what we’re looking for:

Data left for dead,
Noose around its neck? …Mozy
Won’t leave you hangin’!

Add your haiku to the Comments section before it’s too late! In the meantime, continue to back up your files with Mozy. Anything less would keep us up at night! Be safe!

Like our contest? Click here to tweet it!

The small print: Dell employees (including Mozy, etc.) are not eligible to win—even if your haiku is really good. Void where prohibited.

Robotic Revolution: Technology’s Role in Redundancy

When we think of robots, we often think of famous ones from the movies, including C-3PO and R2-D2 from “Star Wars,” Johnny 5 from “Short Circuit,” and Wall-E from “Wall-E.” Those were fun robots with personalities that entertained us. But the robotic revolution is introducing us to the real deal, modern robots that require us to adjust to “the future.” These robots will play a role in everyday life and accepting some of them may be uncomfortable at first (especially if they take our job away!), but the robotic revolution is sure to simplify and make our lives easier, safer, and more efficient. But no need to worry about robots taking over the world! New technology means that more and more new jobs will continue to be created, jobs that only humans can perform! Domo arigato, Mr. Roboto, domo…domo.

Robotic Revolution: Technology’s Role in Redundancy
The ATM was just the start; automation is eating up more and more of the jobs we take for granted. Five million jobs in the world’s leading economies could disappear over the next five years because of advances in technology—the fourth industrial revolution. So which careers will technology feast on in the future? And what does the future look like?
Accounting, finance, data analysis
These jobs are threatened by new technology that converts receipts into machine-readable formats, encrypts them, and then allocates them to accounts. The platform gradually also self-learns, tracks invoices, counts sales and costs, and records liquidity.
Truck drivers
The industry has an incentive to automate: There are currently 5.7 million truck drivers in the USA. The Trucking industry is 30,000 truckers short—(figure to grow to) 250,000 by 2022. Caterpillar plans to debut a fleet of Self-driving, 240-ton mining trucks in coming years. The “driver” of the future might be a technician sitting at a desk somewhere, guiding several trucks at once (as with fighter pilots being replaced by remote-control drones).
Sales and service
Kiosks and self-service tech are the arch enemy of cashiers, sales representatives in manufacturing, retail salespeople, and real estate brokers.
The U.S. Postal Service
One of the hardest-hit industries, USPS will experience a loss of more than 54,500 jobs between 2008 and 2018. 30% of current positions (179,000) are expected to vanish by 2018.
Print media
Increased computer-processing capacity and the widespread availability of more elaborate desktop publishing software make it easier and more affordable for non-printing professionals to use. The future of desktop publishing looks bleak. There will be a decline of 23% jobs by 2008. Current employment: 26,400.
Robotic road ahead
According to The Economic Report of the President (2016), there’s an 83% chance that workers who earn $20 an hour or less could be replaced by robots. Those in the $40 an hour pay range face a 31% chance of having their jobs taken over by machines.
Momentum Machines’ multi-tasker bot makes (and flips) a gourmet hamburger in 10 seconds and could feasibly replace an entire McDonald’s crew. Universal Robots’ manufacturing robot solders, paints, screws, glues, grasps, and builds new parts for itself on the fly when they break. Google won a patent to build worker robots with personalities. And Oxford University researchers estimate that 47% of U.S. jobs could be automated within the next two decades.
The safe zone
There is only so much automation and machines can currently do. Which jobs seem safe from rampant technology? Here are a few doctors and nurses, home health aides, massage therapists, athletes, and creative occupations involving art, design and entertainment.
What does the future look like?
Look on the bright side! Types of jobs have been coming and going for centuries. For example, textile workers in England were replaced by mechanized looms in the 19th century. New jobs are created all the time. Ten years ago, we had not heard of app developers, market research data miners, educational or admissions consultants, millennial generational experts, social media managers, chief listening officers, cloud computing services, elder care service providers, sustainability experts, and user experience designers. Around 65% of children starting primary school today will end up working in jobs that don’t yet exist. New technology means the world’s their oyster. It’s an exciting digital age to be alive.
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Captain Sully saved his life. Mozy saved his files.

You’ve probably heard about the new movie, Sully, the story that recounts US Airways Flight 1549 and Captain Chelsey “Sully” Sullenberger, the pilot who “landed” the Airbus A320 in New York’s Hudson River on January 15, 2009. Just after taking off from LaGuardia Airport, both of the aircraft’s engines were disabled after striking a flock of Canada geese. Realizing there wasn’t time to return to the airport, Captain Sully and his co-pilot Jeffrey Skiles made the decision to ditch the plane in the river. Miraculously, all aboard survived.

Although the “Miracle on the Hudson” is a story that’s known worldwide, there is a smaller, related story that’s not so well known. Businessman Paul Jorgensen was one of the passengers aboard Flight 1549 that day, and EMC was a small part of Jorgensen’s story. That day Jorgensen, a resident of Charlotte, North Carolina, was on his way home from New York to spend the weekend with his family. “January 15, 2009, started as a normal day for me,” Jorgensen remembers. A few minutes after takeoff, things changed. “I thought for sure we were going to die,” Jorgensen says. “I was convinced. I didn’t think we any chance at all to survive.”

Fortunately, Captain Sully’s quick thinking saved all aboard. The 150 passengers and 5 crew members were rescued that day, but personal property was all left behind in the damaged, sinking plane. “It never even occurred to me to grab my laptop or cell phone…or wallet…or keys before I got off the plane,” Jorgensen says.

Once safely back on solid ground, Jorgensen called his company’s IT department. “I’m without a laptop; you have to get me something,” he recalls. The next morning IT provided Jorgensen with a replacement laptop and all of his files as they had been backed up by Mozy from EMC. “I was shocked,” Jorgensen remembers, who says it would have taken him months to replace everything that was on his hard drive.

“Having the laptop delivered with my entire hard drive replicated exactly as I left it saved me literally months of time and hassle,” he says.

Jorgensen says that his experience on Flight 1549 is a reminder that we have very valuable files and “we just simply can’t afford to not back them up on a daily basis.” Today when Jorgensen tells people his story, “I like to say that Captain Sullenberger saved my life. MozyPro from EMC saved my laptop files.”

Tom Hanks plays the lead in “Sully.” It’s quite a performance, but he’s only acting. When it comes to data loss, that’s real. Jorgensen says that backing up valuable data is not a precautionary step to take lightly. “And it doesn’t have to be a plane crash to remind us of that,” he says. Fortunately, you can protect your valuable data with Mozy backup—without landing on the Hudson.

You can hear Paul Jorgensen share his dramatic story here.

Mozy Will Soon Keep Backups Even Longer

Mozy understands that your important files are critical to the success of your business. Likewise, we understand that MozyHome users rely on Mozy to safeguard their documents, photographs, music files, and other important files. Mozy protects your data by keeping older versions of your files available so that they can be restored if necessary. There are various reasons why you might need to restore an older version of a file, including:
   •     You changed a file and want to go back to an older version of the file.
   •     You deleted content from a file and want to retrieve that content.
   •     You accidentally deleted a file and now want it back.
   •     You have a corrupted file (due to ransomware, for example) and need to go back to a version of the file before it became          corrupted.

We will be rolling out a new extended retention policy for all Mozy solutions. That means the older versions of your backed-up files will be kept for longer before they expire. This significantly improves your data protection at no cost to you. For MozyHome users, older file versions will be retained for 3 months (previously, MozyHome retained files for 1 month). For MozyPro users, older file versions will be retained for 6 months (previously, MozyPro retained files for 2 months). For MozyEnterprise users, older file versions will be retailed for 1 year (previously, MozyEnterprise retained files for 3 months).

To enable this extended data retention and the benefits it provides to you, Mozy will be introducing file version consolidation. Mozy restores are highly reliable, but version consolidation allows us to extend that reliability out to greater backup retention times. This means that rather than keeping every version of your files, we progressively consolidate older file versions so that the number of versions available for restore decreases as you go further into the past. For example, for MozyHome we will keep all versions of a file for one day, hourly versions of that file for 3 days, daily versions of that file for 31 days, and weekly versions of that file for 92 days. Version consolidation never loses any data; it merely rolls up the changes of multiple versions into one version. And it is unlikely you will even notice it, since typically you will not need to restore a file version to within an hour from many weeks in the past, whereas you quite likely will want to do so for a restore from yesterday. Because it keeps file version lists shorter, version consolidation allows you to more easily choose a restore point, and it also allows Mozy to provide the restore more quickly.

Mozy is continuously looking for ways to improve the backup process and meet the needs of its users. Our goal is to ensure that each time you save one of your files, it’s backed up, protected and, if necessary, can be recovered and restored exactly as it was.

10 great but inaccurate quotes from technology

Can you remember a time when you said something you wish you hadn’t said? You’re not alone. Each of us is guilty of that. Even the brightest minds have said things they wish they hadn’t said, especially if what they said was a bold statement or proclamation that never came to pass, not even sort of. But that’s OK; such statements make for good conversation even years later. Enjoy our latest infographic!

The greatest tech minds of the 20th and 21st centuries were responsible for great discoveries and insights that changed the way we work, think, relax, and play. But those same great minds also allowed their mouths to say a few things that today cause us to shake our heads and wonder, and maybe even chuckle. Oh, well, no one’s perfect. Take a look at the 10 quotes in our latest infographic and then see if you can guess what year it was said. Answers are at the bottom of the infographic.

The Quotes
1. “Two years from now, spam will be solved.”
2. “You have zero privacy anyway. Get over it.”
3. “But what…is it good for?”
4. “I predict the Internet will soon go spectacularly supernova and in 1996 catastrophically collapse.”
5. “It doesn’t matter how good or bad the product is, the fact is that people don’t read anymore.”
6. “Linux is not in the public domain. Linux is a cancer.”
7. “If you have something that you don’t want anyone to know, maybe you shouldn’t be doing it in the first place.”
8. “There is no reason anyone would want a computer in their home.”
9. “If you’re wrong, you will die.”
10. “Apple is already dead.”

Who said it and when
1. Microsoft’s co-founder Bill Gates made this prediction in 2007 at the World Economic Forum. Maybe he meant SPAM, that canned precooked meat product? No, that’s still around, too.
2. Scott McNealy, CEO and co-founder of Sun Microsystems, speaking about online privacy in 1999. All these years later, he’s probably right, but privacy should be the goal nevertheless.
3. Engineer at the Advanced Computing Systems Division at IBM, commenting on the microchip. Of course, most of us would have probably agreed if we were working in tech back in 1968.
4. Robert Metcalfe, founder of 3Com, said this in 1995. But we can forgive Metcalfe; after all, he is credited with inventing the Ethernet.
5. Even Apple’s Steve Jobs made a few mistakes about technology, like how he responded in 2008 when asked about the likely success of Amazon’s Kindle e-reader.
6. Steve Ballmer, Microsoft’s former CEO, was known to be volatile when discussing the competition. It’s understandable that he would be resistant to any free open-source software.
7. Alphabet Inc. (formerly Google) executive chairman Eric Schmidt’s response when asked in 2009 about whether users should be sharing their information with Google.
8. Ken Olsen, founder of Digital Equipment Corporation, made this statement. But, hey, 1977 was a very long time ago.
9. Intel’s former CEO Andy Grove in his 1996 book, Only the Paranoid Survive. Of course, all of us have been wrong at least once, and we’re all going to die eventually, so technically he’s right.
10. Nathan Myhrvold made that statement when he was CTO of Microsoft. To be fair, Apple stock was down to about $7 a share in 1997. (Yeah, we wish we had bought shares back then, too.)

Experiencing a CATastrophic data loss

Recently, we asked our dear readers to submit a favorite story about how Mozy has saved their bacon. We’ve received numerous accounts that underscore just how important backup (and a quick restore!) is. Some of your stories are funny, some not so funny (who likes to lose data, even temporarily?); however, all of the stories have a happy ending, thanks to Mozy—and your good judgment in choosing the most trusted cloud backup software.

The following story and photo were submitted by Karie Ford, who works at Mozy. Karie’s story and photo remind us of how backing up without Mozy is like trying to herd cats: it can be done, but not easily and not always successfully.

My daughter Josie is currently attending her last year at Utah Valley University. When she is not in school she is at work or in her room studying or writing papers. She basically has no social life, except for Callie. Callie is her 10-year-old cat, who wants ongoing cuddles and attention. In short, this feline believes that my daughter is here to serve her. Callie loves to knock stuff off of dressers and sleep on the laptop keyboard when my daughter is trying to do her school work.

The accompanying photo was taken about two weeks prior to our data-loss incident. Callie is a diva and, it seems, felt like the laptop was getting all of the “love.” Callie decided to “own” this laptop and peed on the keyboard. The laptop is not only disgusting, it is also TOAST.

Mozy online backup and restore to the rescue! We bought a new laptop and restored all of my daughter’s files over the weekend. Yes, we still have the cat.

Thanks, Karie, for sharing how Mozy saved your bacon!

The takeaway from this account? When it comes to backup and restore, anything other than Mozy should make you nervous, kind of like a cat would be in a room full of rocking chairs. Don’t take chances—insist on Mozy cloud backup!

We would love to hear more from our users. There are two opportunities to win a gift card for your submissions:

•     This contest is open to MozyHome and MozyPro users only:  For a chance to win a $200 gift card, tell us how            Mozy has saved your bacon for you or your business. Submit your entry by May 31, at which time we will randomly            select a winner. Your story may be published in a future Mozy blog or newsletter! For more information, visit our blog.
•     This contest is open to Mozy Resellers only: For a chance to win a GoPro camera, submit a photo in the Comments            below of the most bizarre or funny way that someone can lose data (real or not). A winner will be selected by the Mozy            marketing team at the end of the quarter (June 30). We will publish the winning photo in a future Mozy blog or Mozy            Reseller newsletter. Interested in becoming a Mozy Reseller? Click here.

Sorry, but Mozy/EMC employees are not eligible for these gift cards (but you may still submit your stories and photos).

Share your story and you might win a $200 gift card


Your data is important to you. Whether it’s a file of a journal entry or a critical tax document or a digital copy of a photo of a beloved ancestor, losing such a file might mean never getting it back again…unless you’ve backed it up.

Have you ever lost an important file and thought all was lost…and then Mozy came to the rescue? What were your feelings when you discovered the file was gone? (It’s OK if you shed a tear or two.) What was it like to recover your important file when you remembered that you were in good hands with Mozy? (It’s OK if you jumped up and down for joy and shed a tear or two because you realized how much you love Mozy.) We want to hear about it!

It’s simple: Tell us how Mozy has saved your bacon. Tell us why your data is important to you (whatever the reason, that’s why it’s important to us!). Plus, we would love to share your story in a future MozyHome or MozyPro newsletter. We’re going to make things interesting: We’ll be giving away a $200 gift card to one random entry! That’s awesome! That’s Mozy!

Send your story to

Happy Habits

In this day and age of lots to do and multiple devices to do it on, you might sometimes feel stressed. After watching family members, co-workers, and random strangers in the grocery store, gym, and other gathering places, I’ve come to the conclusion that we need more happy habits. Sure, most of us have developed some pretty good habits, but they’re not always happy habits. Often times, they’re more like responsibilities; you know, the kind of things we have to do (like cleaning the bathroom) or we’re supposed to do (like going to the gym every day. Or maybe that’s every other day?).

As I was thinking about my stress levels, I started making a mental list of my happy habits. It wasn’t long before I thought about one of my favorites: eating See’s candy. (Yes, I readily admit that my See’s habit is one of the reasons I go to the gym.) I have been enjoying See’s candy since I was a little kid. And when I say little, I mean little. Both sets of grandparents introduced me to the delights of See’s when I was just old enough to walk. Now that I look back on those early days, that’s probably why I learned to walk: “Brian, come here! Come on, walk to grandma! Come and get a piece of See’s!” Once I figured out what See’s was, I needed very little encouragement to walk.

One of my earliest and fondest memories of enjoying See’s candy was riding in my grandfather’s 1953 Chevy Bel Air 4 door to pick up my grandmother, who worked part-time at the nearby department store. This was in the days when seatbelts weren’t mandatory, so we kids were like dogs with our heads sticking out the windows, enjoying the cool Southern California breeze blowing in our faces. Picking up grandma also meant treats from See’s. Grandma would be waiting by the curb with a small white bag of those wonderful butterscotch lollipops.

On the drive home, my grandfather would honk the horn (which embarrassed my grandma, which only encouraged my grandpa to honk even more) any opportunity he got. Us kids thought it was the funniest thing in the world. It didn’t seem that life could get any better than those moments. Cool breeze, butterscotch lollipops, laughter, and being with grandma and grandpa. Those were good memories—happy memories to be sure. And that’s what I’m talking about: first, always be aware of opportunities to create happy moments with the ones you love. And then develop the habit of looking back to relive those good feelings when you’re feeling stressed. And even when you’re not stressed, happy memories make today a lot better, and they make our tomorrows a lot more enticing. While it’s true that you can’t relive the past, the sweet habits we’ve created because of them can sure help us minimize our stress levels. For me, a butterscotch lollipop confirms that.

Could Your Data Be Hijacked and Held for Ransom?

Hospitals were on edge recently when the Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center was hit by cyberterrorists. After all, if this Los Angeles hospital’s information could be held for ransom, why couldn’t another’s? Which is, in fact, the reality: any organization, including medical, government, education, industry, etc. can be the target of a ransomware extortion plot.

If you didn’t hear about the incident, here it is in a nutshell: Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center is an acute-care facility with physicians representing a wide variety of specialties, from cardiac and cancer care to fetal therapy and maternity services. A few weeks ago hackers hijacked the hospital’s computer system, preventing access to any data by encrypting it. Initially, hackers demanded $3.6 million in return for releasing the data. Although the attackers later decreased their demands to 40 bitcoins (worth $17,000) in exchange for a decryption key, they had made a point to the world: patient data and medical records are not safe from hackers.

A sobering lesson can be learned (again): important data must always be protected. Hackers don’t necessarily care who the data belongs to; they will do their best to exploit any weakness in the IT infrastructure to steal, damage, or hold for ransom an organization’s data. Like most criminals, cybercriminals are opportunists who seek out easy targets. Are you an easy target? Just for starters, consider this: Is your data unencrypted? Do you employ password protection policies? Are you using expired antivirus software?

Fortunately, organizations can safeguard their data by backing it up to the cloud. The more secure your data is, the more likely are cybercriminals to look elsewhere for better odds of accessing important or sensitive data. Don’t let your data become vulnerable! So, when looking for a service that backs up to the cloud, what should you expect? There are many points to consider, including the following:

•     Is your data encrypted in transit and at rest?
•     Do you have the option to use your own encryption keys?
•     Are backups automated?
•     Is the cloud service audited and certified?

Finally, ask yourself this question: In the event of hardware failure, theft, virus attack (including a ransomware extortion plot!), accidental deletion, or natural or man-made disaster, will my data be safe and recoverable quickly?

Organizations rely on digitized data more than ever. As such, all organizations—from the smallest business to the largest enterprise—must take the necessary steps to ensure that their data is securely backed up, accessible, and easily recoverable.