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The True Cost of Poor Cybersecurity

It might be the oldest attitude in the books: “It won’t happen to me.” Or, “I’ll take care of it later.” But there is a reality that can be costly to businesses, even to the point of taking a business offline or out of commission for good. We’re talking about cyberattacks. They can happen to anyone, anytime. The cost? —Six figures? Seven figures? Ten figures? Depending on the size of the business, any one of these amounts is possible. Take a look at our infographic to explore the true cost of poor cybersecurity.

THE TRUE COST OF POOR CYBERSECURITY: The 5 Worst Data Breaches and Most Costly Viruses
Everyone thinks it always happens to someone else and they are safe from a cyberattack. The companies and individuals on our countdown certainly thought that. Cyberattacks can happen to anyone at anytime.   Whether it is hackers or self-replicating viruses, poor cybersecurity can end up costing you a lot.

5 Worst Data Breaches
#1 American Business Hack
Year: 2005–2012
Records Lost: 160 million
A hacking ring from Russia and Ukraine targeted banks, retail chain stores and payment processors, stealing more than 160 million credit and debit card numbers and more than 800,000 bank account numbers.
#2 eBay
Year: 2014
Records Lost: 145 million
No credit card information was compromised; however, hackers stole customer names, addresses, date of birth, and other personal information. Password information was also compromised. The online auction house simply asked customers to change their passwords immediately.
#3 Heartland Payment Systems
Year: 2006–2008
Records Lost: 130 million
Heartland, one of the world’s largest payment processing companies, was hacked using malware, resulting in the loss of credit and debit card numbers. The mastermind behind the crime was given a 20-year jail sentence, the longest handed down for a computer crime. Heartland ended up paying credit card companies $100 million in claims settlement related to the breach.
#4 TJX
Year: 2003
Records Lost: 94 million
The parent company to stores like T. J. Maxx and Marshalls has said hackers took credit and debit card numbers, and in some instances entire customer identities were stolen, including driver license numbers. The breach ended up costing TJX $256 million and was masterminded by the same person who was in charge of the #3 Heartland hack on the countdown.
#5 Anthem
Year: 2015
Records Lost: 80 million
Names, Social Security numbers, and other sensitive information ideal for identity theft were taken from the second largest health insurance company in America. The hack was said to have originated in China.
5 Most Costly Viruses
Year: 2004
PCs Infected: 2 Million
Damages: $38,000,000,000
MyDoom was a worm spread through e-mail. 1 in 4 e-mails carried the virus at one time. Mydom was a line in the program’s code (mydomain) and thus, after adding an “o”, it was named.
Year: 2003
PCs Infected: 2 Million
Damages: $37,100,000,000
Self-replicating worm spread through e-mail.
Year: 2000
PCs Infected: 500,000 (That’s about 10% of the world’s computers at the time)
Malicious program hidden in an email attachment. ILOVEYOU was the first virus that attached itself to an e-mail.
Year: 2007
PCs Infected: 12 Million
Damages: $9,100,000,000
Confliker was a worm that scanned computers for weaknesses, logged keystrokes and downloaded code from hacker websites. This virus is still active and as of August 2015, is still infecting about 1 million computers worldwide.
Year: 2001
PCs Infected: 1 Million
Damages: $2,600,000,000
Code Red was a worm that exploited an OS vulnerability, actively looking for other machines to attack. It took down and defaced websites, most notably It was nicknamed Code Red because the pair who discovered the virus were drinking Mountain Dew Code Red at the time of discovery.
35% of businesses have lost data due to flawed IT security. Don’t be caught unprepared. Let Mozy help you manage your cloud security needs.
Visit to learn more about how Mozy can keep your data safe and secure.

The Limited Lifespan of Technology

What do cars and technology have in common? Both lose value the moment you purchase them.

For cars, this isn’t much of an issue since they will usually continue to run just fine for several years. Unlike smartphones, computers, and other tech, they don’t need upgrades. The average age of a passenger car/light vehicle in the U.S. is over 11 years, according to They even get special “historic” license plates in most states after 20 years! Personal technology, though, rarely offers a fully functional lifespan for more than a couple of years.

OS upgrades leave many existing devices behind
Technology you use in your home and at work isn’t as durable as cars. There are three main reasons why personal tech doesn’t do so well in the longevity game.

1.  It breaks easily, particularly mobile technology like tablets and smartphones.
2.  Major operating system (OS) upgrades are often too advanced for existing
3.  Consumers are used to wireless technology, which makes infrequent, but
     dramatic, upgrades.

Are consumers fighting constant upgrades?
Some consumers who have managed to keep their mobile devices longer than manufacturers expect (meaning they haven’t broken them) are voluntarily holding on to them for longer periods than before, Gallup reports. More than half of surveyed consumers told a Gallup poll in April and May 2015 that they hold on to their phones only until they stop working or become obsolete. So, when is a device obsolete?

Most consumers don’t seem to be bothered by an OS upgrade for at least several months. This might explain why 44% told Gallup they stay with contracts to get a phone upgrade every two years. By then, they are ready for something new. Mobile devices are further burdened by network upgrades. Have you tried to operate a 3G device in an area with the “lightening speed” of 4G? Networks don’t serve older devices well, and few have space for upgrades.

Computers operate past their OS support lives
Like cars, desktops and laptops operate even when they’re technically obsolete. There’s a bit of relief in that apps and developers are far more focused on the mobile world. In addition, many computers come with the capacity for upgrades, something few mobile devices offer. Still, while most OS systems may function for years, they lose official support long before they stop working. Microsoft ended support for Windows XP after a 10-year run; support for Vista will end in 2017, also after 10 years. Apple phases out support for its older OS releases even more quickly.

Not surprisingly, Microsoft and Apple both offered limited free upgrades to their latest OS for customers who had more recent versions. There’s nothing like an upgrade to make you aware of all the new software out there you hadn’t considered because…you had an older OS that couldn’t run them.

Consumers are intrigued by new tech approaches
While new apps and other toys are fun, the fact is that many consumers don’t want to learn how to use a replacement device every year, according to Accenture. In the spirit of the Internet of Things, consumers are more interested in buying new approaches to technology.

•   In January 2015, 12% of consumers told Accenture they plan to buy a wearable fitness monitor in the next year
•   40% said they plan to make this purchase in the next five years
•   Over the next five years, consumers plan to buy smart surveillance systems (41%), smart thermostats (39%), and 3D printers

Sure, it’s a lot of fun to have the latest car or the latest technology, but if you decide to wait a little longer before your next purchase, don’t worry; there is always something new and exciting to look forward to no matter when you decide to replace that “old” technology!


Mozy Summer Photo Contest 2015 winners announced!

WINNER!!! “Staying cool in the city”

Judging by the photographs you submitted to this year’s Mozy Summer Photo Contest, it’s pictorially obvious that you are enjoying the summer. Take a look at this year’s submissions.

We received lots of wonderful images that made us want to be where you were! There were so many fun photos that we wish we could award everyone a prize. But you knew the rules when you entered our contest: $25 gift cards for three runners-up and a $50 gift card for the grand prize winner. Images were voted on by members of the Mozy Marketing team. The most votes per photo determined the winners.

After all the votes were counted, here are the winners:
•   Grand Prize: “Staying Cool in the City”
•   Runners-Up Prizes:
     º   “U9 West Seattle Steelheads”
     º   “Dude with Venus, Jupiter, and a Waxing Crescent Moon”
     º   “The Marina at Chula Vista”

U9 West Seattle Steelheads

Dude with Venus, Jupiter, and a Waxing Crescent Moon

The Marina at Chula Vista

Congratulations to each of our winners! And a warm summer thanks to each of you for sharing some of your favorite summer memories with us. If you didn’t win a prize this year, there is always next summer. In the meantime, continue to enjoy the summer…it’s almost over. Be cool, have fun, and be safe!

And don’t forget: Because you back up to the cloud with Mozy by EMC, you will always be a winner.

Congrats to all of our winners! If you are one of the winners, please send an email to and include your snail mail and email addresses.

What’s in a name? You wouldn’t know these companies by their first names

Brad’s Drink

In 1893 Caleb Bradham opened a pharmacy in North Carolina after dropping out of medical school due to a family crisis. While running his pharmacy he concocted a “healthy” cola, which was thought to aid in digestion. This refreshing drink was concocted of sugar, water, caramel, lemon oil, nutmeg, and other additives and was called “Brad’s Drink.” That name only lasted for five years and in 1898 it was renamed to…Pepsi Cola.


BackRub it. Yeah, that sounds way weird, but if one well-known company had kept their original name, we would be saying “BackRub it” instead of “Google it.” Way back in 1996, Ph.D. students Larry Page and Sergey Brin created a search engine they called BackRub. Taking up too much bandwidth on Stanford University’s website, Page and Brin eventually moved the company to a friend’s garage and registered the Google domain name, which originated from the word “googol,” which is the number 1 followed by 100 zeros.

Computing-Tabulation-Recording Corporation

The merger of four companies in 1911 created the Computing-Tabulation-Recording Company. The company manufactured a wide range of products, including employee time-keeping systems, weighing scales, automatic meat slicers, and punched card equipment. In 1924 the company was renamed to International Business Machines, otherwise known around the world as IBM.

Marufuku Co. Ltd

Originally named Marufuku, this company produced and marketed Hanafuda cards.  In 1951 the company’s name was changed to “Nintendo Playing Card Co. Ltd.”

After the president of the company visited the largest playing card company at that time and saw how small the offices were, he decided to explore other ventures that could be more profitable. In 1963 the company dropped the “Playing Card Co. Ltd.” from their name and simplified it to Nintendo. Nintendo tried to find an industry where they could establish a solid business, even dabbling in the hotel industry, taxi services, and other ventures that continued to fail. Testing various markets, they finally hit gold with Nintendo Entertainment Center in 1986.

Jerry’s Guide to the World Wide Web

Once again Stanford University makes an appearance on our list. Two graduate students were putting off finishing their doctoral studies and playing around on the new phenomenon known as the World Wide Web. As they found new sites that they liked they would index them in a directory on their website. As the list began to grow, they decided to call their website “Jerry and David’s Guide to the World Wide Web,” after Jerry Yang and David Filo, the two students. The site was renamed in 1995 to Yahoo!, a backronym for “Yet Another Hierarchically Organized Oracle.”!

Use the cloud to help create your wedding day

In recent articles we’ve highlighted a few industries that have benefited from cloud computing. Although the cloud is beneficial to SMBs and enterprises, there are many ways that consumers take advantage of the cloud. Let’s take a look at preparing for a wedding.

Today you would be hard pressed to find a Rolodex in any of our homes, thanks to the digital age. To avoid having to reach out to each of our friends and family for their information, consider taking a Wikipedia approach to collecting the mailing information for your wedding guests. I suggest using Google forms to address this need.

Google forms allow you to create a free “survey” where prospective guests can fill out their information. Google even has created some great background theme images that you can use. Once the survey is customized to your liking you can then send a link to your friends. In this case I suggest sending it in a message via Facebook (because that’s where most of us have connected with our closest friends). Once the guests enter in the info it’s compiled in an easy-to-access spreadsheet, which can be shared with your future spouse and can also be exported and sent to your local print/copy shop for printing invitations. Ten minutes to create the form can save hours of contacting each and every person.

What about the cloud and wedding gifts? Each new couple needs a few sets of matching bathroom towels, but how do you avoid getting duplicate gifts? Set up a gift registry! Target and Bed Bath & Beyond have thoughtfully created an easy way to register for the gifts that you need. The recently engaged couple can add gifts via the company’s site or by going into the store. The updated list is then accessible at any of their stores or via the registry on the company’s site. The company even stores your address for guests that are out of town and won’t be able to attend the wedding.

Helping all those involved in the wedding visualize what you want on your special day is crucial. If you or your loved one has collected hundreds of images of the perfect fairytale wedding, be sure that you have access to them anywhere you go. Mozy’s mobile app lets you sync your files from your computer to your mobile device without having to use the storage space on your phone. Within seconds you have instant access to images of the ideal bouquet or wedding dress. Why leave it to chance? Use the cloud help you create your special day!

Threats to Enterprise Businesses – Infographic

We got to thinking about the enterprise and how it’s often thought of as a modern-day venture. But the enterprise has been around a long time. In fact, historically, enterprise-sized companies have come and gone for any number of reasons, primarily because they weren’t prepared for the unexpected or they underestimated economic indicators. And today’s enterprises are no less immune from threats than yesterday’s enterprises. Whether man-made or natural, internal or external, there are persistent forces out there ready to take down any enterprise not properly prepared or protected. If you’re looking to protect your business from data loss, take a look at MozyEnterprise by EMC, a cloud-based solution that protects data and provides data restores. We’ve been around a long time and we’re here to help you do the same.

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When movies predicted the future in tech

A Trip to the Moon” was released in 1902 and was one of the first if not the first science fiction movies. In it a group of scientists are shot out of a cannon the size of World War II railway gun “Schwerer Gustav” right into the eye of the moon. The scientists explore the moon and even have an encounter with the moon’s inhabitants. It wasn’t until 1969 that Neal Armstrong would actually step foot on the moon. I’m sure that in 1902 a trip to the moon in the literal sense was an incomprehensible journey. It took 67 years for the movie to become a reality when Armstrong took his first step—and that giant leap for mankind.

Let’s take a look back at what other movie tech was far-fetched for the time but has become a reality today.

Although the 1980’s television series “Knight Rider” only lasted four seasons, KITT—the crime-fighting talking car—has since become a pop culture icon. It’s said that KITT contained a cybernetic processor that was created by the U.S. government but was then used in the iconic Pontiac Trans Am. Comparable to KITT’s capabilities is Apple’s CarPlay, which allows drivers to interact with Siri. Because of cloud computing, the processor can reside in a data center far away and isn’t required in the car. With the introduction of self-driving cars and the great strides that AI has made, look for a real KITT in the near future.

And let’s not forget about the Batmobile! If I had a bank account similar to Bruce Wayne’s (aka Batman), I would definitely fund the research for a few of those cool toys that he relies on, especially the Batmobile. Think of the convenience of having a car pick you up at the airport terminal rather than trying to remember where you parked it in the acres and acres of parking lot. That idea may not be so far-fetched. The Audi A7 is a prototype that is essentially waiting to go through a few legal hurdles before it can be released. Using sensors, cameras and GPS, the car can navigate itself through your daily commute and can even pick you up. Right off the bat you may need a few bucks from your rich Uncle Bruce, but as with all new technology, such a car should be affordable in a few short years.

Although Alderaan—the fictional “Star Wars” planet—wouldn’t be excited for this new advancement in technology, the U.S. Navy has developed a “directed-energy weapon,” otherwise known as LaWS. LaWS is a defense system that the Navy uses to shoot down unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs)—otherwise known as drones—and small boats. It’s less expensive and faster than using guns or missile systems and minimizes collateral damage. The system focuses six high-energy lasers on the target—much like the Death Star did in “Star Wars” to blow up Alderaan.

I am Iron Man!!! Or at least I wish I could be. Although Iron Man is a fictional superhero, the U.S. military has been working on a usable, non-clunky, exoskeleton for its soldiers during combat. Tony Stark would be impressed by the recent advancements in exoskeleton technology, which has allowed these exo suits to become a reality, even if only in experimental form. In 2010, defense contractor Raytheon demonstrated XOS 2, which is essentially a robot guided by the human brain. This suit allowed the user to lift two to three times as much weight than what the user could have without the suit. Exo suits can also be used to protect soldiers from shrapnel and bullets. These suits will not only help us feel more super-heroish, they will also allow people with spine injuries or muscle-deteriorating diseases to get around easier.

The future is exciting and the sky is the limit when it comes to advancements in technology. Send us your thoughts on what you would like to see down the road.

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My name is Jen and I work for Mozy

We are pleased to introduce Jen, who is a member of the Mozy Sales team. She is consistently one of the first to arrive at work and one of the last to leave. Not only is she a dedicated employee, she is charismatic and well-informed about a wide variety of subjects. And if you are ever having a bad day, Jen is always dependable for a hug or words of encouragement that will change the color of your mood ring—unless you are rooting for the San Diego Chargers or the Oakland Raiders. Mozy scored extra points when Jen was hired! Read below to learn more on what makes Jen…well, Jen.

I define my workspace as…

Wall-to-wall information! Nearly every inch is covered with 4” x 6” notecards of things that I have learned. That is one thing I love about working in this industry; it is forever evolving and I am forever learning.

A device I can’t live without….

My phone. I wish I had a better answer, but I don’t. I use it more as a camera than anything else. I have a six-month-old baby boy and I feel the need to document every giggle and smile.

When I arrive at work, I typically start my day off by…

Nesting. I turn on my computer, straighten any papers, and then grab my yellow notepad and favorite pen. At that point I can begin my day.

How long have you worked for Mozy?

One and a half glorious years. I have honestly been so happy here.

I do/do not listen to music at work and it helps me work better because …

I don’t listen to music at work; I am on the phone too much. I am constantly humming though, so I guess you could say that I make my own music.

If you could be in one TV sitcom or movie, what would it be and why?

This one is tough! I would have to go with “Modern Family.” I love to watch the individual relationships and how they pair unlikely characters in plotlines. I think I would laugh non-stop.

Outside of work, I am passionate about …

My family, my friends, and the Denver Broncos. I am very blessed to have a big family that includes many close friends; they are the best part of my day. The second best part? Anything involving Bronco Country! I bleed orange and blue and am very lucky to be a part of a franchise that has had two of the best QBs of all time!

My eating habits are …

Carnivorous! I grew up in a “meat and potatoes” home where a meal isn’t a meal unless it includes meat. My favorite, you ask? STEAK!

If I could be someone for a day, I would be …

I can’t pick just one… Lucille Ball, Jackie O or Audrey Hepburn. All classy women who are as strong as they are beautiful.

The “secret sauce” that makes me who I am …

I love laughing. If I could laugh to the point of tears every day of my life, I would die a very happy girl. I’ve never had milk come out my nose though, but I’m still young!

One thing that makes me unique is….

I can see the humor in any situation. It’s there, I promise. I think that being able to “find the funny” has helped me though some very tough times. As I mentioned, I love to laugh and get those around me to laugh as well.

Guilty pleasure…

It’s hard to decide between “Clash of Clans” and “The Bachelor.” One is delightfully nerdy and the other is a train wreck for my viewing pleasure. My husband even enjoys one with me; I’ll let you guess which one!

Preparing your business for the next man-made disaster

Our friends at Boston University put together this infographic on man-made disasters—which includes theft, fraud and corruption—and the effects they have on businesses. One way to thwart insider fraud is to be sure that your business performs a risk assessment at least annually or more frequently. One aspect of the risk assessment should be whether or not your crucial business files are protected and can be recovered in the event of a man-made disaster. By backing up with Mozy you are ensuring that your files are encrypted locally during the initial backup process. Your encrypted files are sent through a secure SSL connection. Mozy then protects your data in Mozy’s world-class data centers, which have successfully completed the SSAE 16 Type 2 audit and are ISO 27001 certified. You’ve gotta ask yourself one question: Are your business files ready for a man-made disaster? Feeling lucky isn’t going to cut it.

This week in tech history – April 26th – May 2nd

April 26, 1970 World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) is formally created with the goal to promote creative intellectual activity and for facilitating the transfer of technology.

April 27, 1965 Disposable diapers “Pampers” are patented by R.C. Duncan, bringing joy to anyone who had to clean a soiled cloth diaper.

April 28, 1932 Vaccine for a viral disease that wiped out 9% of the U.S. population in 1793 is released. The disease is Yellow Fever.

April 29, 1953 The first experimental 3D TV broadcast is shown on a Los Angeles station.

April 30, 1993 CERN (the European Organization for Nuclear Research) announces that the World Wide Web will be free to anyone, starting the .com boom.

May 1, 1981 Radio Shack releases TRS-DOS 1.3, which replaces cassette tapes with disk files with a capacity of an astounding 89 kilobytes each.

Mzy 2, 2000 GPS, once authorized for military use only, is made available to everyone by authorization of U.S. President Bill Clinton.

Want to see more?  Check out our tech history infographic