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How to Use LinkedIn for Business

You’ve wanted to learn how to use LinkedIn for business for quite some time now. However, the only tips that you’ve been getting from the Internet so far are the cookie-cutter ones (you know, things like complete your profile, network, etc.). It’s quite frustrating, isn’t it?

When you think about it, although the cookie-cutter tips are technically correct, it doesn’t really give you an edge over your competitors because everybody knows about it. What’s worse, none of these tips are actionable.

If you’re tired of reading useless, borderline cringe-worthy tips on how to use LinkedIn for business, then you’re in the right place. I will share with you three LinkedIn marketing tips that are actionable, simple to implement, and most of all effective.

Let’s hop right in.

1. Use LinkedIn’s “15 Ways to Keep in Touch” feature.

The thing with using LinkedIn is it can be such a productivity black hole, especially if you aren’t keeping track of your time. That’s why using LinkedIn’s “15 Ways to Keep in Touch” feature is such an amazing strategy; it works somewhat as a “counter.” The way I use it is I send messages to all 15 users, and when I’m done sending messages, I then stop using LinkedIn and proceed on doing other more important tasks.

Before you use this tip, I’d like to highlight two critical points first:

1. Send a personalized message. You can create a template if you want, but be sure to leave room for customization. Don’t ever send LinkedIn’s “Congrats on the new job!” default message.

2. Do not sell your services on your first contact. Establish a level of connection with them first. On my end, I tend to send my pitch on my 3rd or 4th reply to their message, depending on how our conversation progresses.

This is one of my favorite strategies on how to use LinkedIn for business. Not only is it effective in terms of bringing you new customers, but it also helps you keep track of your time, making it easier for you to manage it.

2. Uncover possibilities of collaboration with the users connecting with you.

When other LinkedIn users start sending you connection requests, I hope you aren’t just accepting them without sending them a message. That would be a wasted opportunity! Because you’d like to learn how to use LinkedIn for business, here’s what you can do instead. You can send them a message thanking them for connecting with you, add a one-liner personal message, then ask about possibilities where you can both collaborate.

Giving them that kind of message will show the person on the other end that you are a real person, and a “likable” one at that! This is one of the versions that I use when others add me at LinkedIn:

“Hi (first name).

I appreciate connection request. How’s everything in (write the name of their city here)?

Can you tell me more about your job role in (the company that they are connected with)? I’d love to explore opportunities where we can both collaborate in the future. Take care.

Signature”

This template usually yields surprising results. The user almost always replies with what it is that they do and asks me about what kind of collaboration opportunities I have in mind. At this point, all you need to do is to pitch your services strategically to what it is that they do. If they’d like to give your idea a try, then they’ll go for it. But if not, then just be a good sport and accept their decision.

Another route that you can take (which you should almost always be doing) is to ask for referrals. Doing so gives you more mileage on every connection/relationship that you establish.

3. Contact the users who viewed your profile.

There’s a reason why others are viewing your profile. Whatever that reason is, you can bet your family jewels that it has something to do with the work that you do, or the product or services that you offer. This somewhat makes them a warm lead. Be sure to capitalize on this feature and start contacting those who viewed your profile. Your message doesn’t have to be long and intricate. You can say something along the lines of:

“Hi (first name).

I noticed that you viewed my profile. If there’s anything that I can help you with, do let me know.

I wish you the best! 

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What makes this strategy so effective is the fact that it isn’t intrusive at all. I say that because between you and the other user, it isn’t really you who showed the first interest. It was him/her by checking out your profile.

What’s next?

What are some of the LinkedIn marketing tips that you can share with our readers? If there are strategies on how to use LinkedIn for business that you feel should be a part of this list, then please share them in the comments section below.