Blog Archives

Read your Facebook EULA lately?

There’s been a huge amount of discussion in the media over the last 48 hours about Facebook’s experiment on emotional contagion and whether it was appropriate for the social media company to carry it out. Here’s one such article from the Wall Street Journal.

What a lot of people are finding frightening, as Gismodo explains, is that they didn’t realize that they had actually agreed to take part when they signed up to the company’s EULA.

No idea what a EULA is? You’re not alone.  A EULA is an end-user licensing agreement. It’s essentially the big blurb of terms and conditions that you have to tick the “I agree” box next to in order to be able to use the service.

Do you remember agreeing to taking part in Facebook experiments? No? Well, if you’re a Facebook user, the chances are that you have agreed to it. Statistically, there’s a strong possibility that you never read the EULA before you agreed to it. In a recent Mozy investigation,[1] less than 10 percent of people told us that they made a point of reading a EULA before signing up to an online service and more than 30 percent never read any of them.

If there’s one lesson to take away from this incident, it’s to carefully check the EULAs on the cloud services you’re using, both personally and at work. Can your provider view your data? Can they change the location of your data center? Who owns your data if you want to leave the service?

And it’s not just the core cloud services that your company uses that you should check over. Many companies have a huge “shadow IT” infrastructure set up by people who might not have access to legal support and are often unfamiliar with best practice in selecting IT partners. If your business lets individuals choose their own services to move large files, sync data to the cloud, outsource role-specific IT support—or anything else—make sure you have a policy for checking those EULAs. Because, if it’s not being done centrally, there’s a good chance that it’s not being done at all!

And, if you don’t know what sort of issues to be looking for in your EULAs, check out this white paper from IDC.



[1] Online poll carried out in December 2013 of Facebook users in the USA, Ireland, UK, France, Germany, and the Netherlands.

What does ‘enterprise-ready’ mean?

What makes a cloud service “enterprise ready”? Is it enterprise pricing models? An enterprise sales team? An enterprise mentality?

As more and more cloud service providers look to target enterprises with their offerings, the “enterprise-ready” question becomes increasingly important. The ‘third platform’ (adopting cloud-based apps instead of traditional server-based solutions) is gaining traction within big business, as expected. But how do they find out which solutions are truly built to meet their needs?

What does enterprise ready mean?

At Mozy, we take our enterprise credentials seriously. Sure, we offer a product that’s so simple to use that millions of individuals trust us with their data protection. But we also have more than one hundred thousand businesses and one thousand enterprises who choose Mozy to protect their data.

Why? Well, at Mozy, we believe that being enterprise ready is something that needs to permeate the whole of our business. It means building world-class data centers that run on enterprise-grade hardware. It means offering enterprise-level security at all stages of the backup process. It means offering enterprise-quality support with dedicated resources 24x7x365. It means enterprise control and administrative tools. It means being a part of EMC, a global leader in data protection and availability solutions. It means a hundred different things, not least of which is a commitment to excellence in compliance.

That’s why Mozy has long made SOC 1 SSAE 16 Type II examination and ISO 27001 certification a priority. Mozy is one of the only cloud data protection service providers to undertake these rigorous independent security assessments. This sort of compliance exercise is completely voluntary and not something to be entered into lightly – we see it as a badge of honor and an external validation of our commitment to you, our valued customer.

So, what does ‘enterprise-ready’ mean? It means thinking at every turn about what enterprises need and going the extra mile to provide it. Or, that’s what we think anyway. Tell us what you think in the comments below.

Mozy Takes Home a “Best Use of Technology” Stevie Award for Legendary Support

Stevie AwardAt Mozy, our customers come first. But if there’s something else we truly believe in, it’s the power of technology to transform businesses. So, when we have a chance to marry the two together and use technology to improve the customer experience – well, we jump at it!

In recent years, we’ve completely overhauled our online support experience with improved facilities for online chat, a huge knowledge base of articles, an enhanced online community and even resources for solving customer issues through social media.

You guys only see the front end of those solutions but there’s a lot going in the background to make all of those things work together. That way, as you access different support channels, we have a single view of you, and our agents always have the information they need at their finger tips to support you in the best possible way.

We hope you’ve noticed how easy it now is to access support from Mozy. Someone else that’s noticed is the judging team at the Stevie Awards. The Stevie Awards for Sales & Customer Service are the world’s top recognition for sales, contact-center, and customer-service excellence.

Last week, the Stevie Awards judging team gave Mozy an award in the Best Use of Technology category at their Sales and Customer Service awards ceremony.

We’re so proud of our award and our support team overall. You can find out why by reading more about the team and what we offer here. And, if you ever need us, our award winning team is right here 24x7x365.

Four key questions to ask your cloud provider

What questions should you ask before trusting your data to a cloud service? Not all cloud services are the same and by not asking key questions up front, you can leave your business exposed.

To highlight what can happen when you trust people with your data without checking them out first, Mozy carried out a hidden camera experiment asking a series of strangers in a coffee shop to look after a laptop. Find out what happened:

What should our man have asked before trusting anyone with his data?

  • How long will you look after it?
    Just as some of our participants only protected the data for a limited period of time, not all providers are in it for the long term. Find out how long the provider has been around and how committed to the market it really is.
  • Will you look at my data?
    Some participants in the experiment thought the data on our laptop might be of value to them. Some cloud providers will scrape your data to create anonomised information to sell on to advertisers. Encryption and privacy commitments are essential here – make sure your cloud provider has them.
  • Will you leave my data vulnerable?
    Some of the people in our experiment did very little to keep the data safe, leaving it unattended as they left the coffee shop and went about their business. Some cloud providers don’t encrypt data and some take physical security more seriously than others. Make sure that your cloud provider is storing your data on enterprise-class equipment, in tier 4 data centers and in an encrypted state at all times.
  • Can anyone take my data?
    In the film, we saw someone take the computer they were trusted with but we also had people who let a computer be taken from them. Data can be intercepted when using cloud services if the provider has failed to secure it. Ensure that your provider offers end-to-end encryption and transfers data over an SSL connection.

For more advice on what to ask before choosing a cloud provider, check out this whitepaper from IDC.