Mozy is for real, Martians are not

The other day I watched a rerun of the 1960’s sitcom, “My Favorite Martian.” The TV show was about a Martian (who looks like a human) who crashes his spaceship near Los Angeles. He ends up rooming with newspaper reporter Tim O’Hara, who is the only human who knows of this extraterrestrial’s true identity. O’Hara passes off the Martian as his “Uncle Martin” and keeps his identity secret, hoping to avoid a panic that earth has been invaded by Martians. When he’s not trying to avoid a nosey neighbor, Uncle Martin spends his time trying to repair his spaceship.

If you didn’t know that Uncle Martin was a nice guy, you might be afraid. After all, he could raise two retractable antennae from his head and then disappear. Uncle Martin was also telepathic and could levitate things just by moving his finger. And he could freeze people.

A lot has happened since those Uncle Martin days. In 1975, the Viking 1 and Viking 2 probes were launched into space to a 140,000,000 destination: Mars. First the probes orbited the planet for more than a month, sending images back to earth. About a year after their journey began, Viking 1 and Viking 2 touched down on the Mars surface. Mankind had finally put something human-made on the second-smallest planet in our solar system. Uncle Martin might have been jealous that Viking 1 and Viking 2 arrived before he did.

The Viking probes did not encounter Martians, but they did discover geological shapes that seemed to indicate they were formed by water. Information from each Viking was stored in data storage memory, which had a storage capacity of 8,200 words. Data would be transferred daily to a tape recorder, which could store a whopping (in those days) 40 million bits of information.

In mid-2003, two “MERs” blasted off into space. Their mission: to explore the surface and geology of Mars and determine whether life ever existed on the planet. The Mars Exploration Rovers landed on the Red Planet in January the following year. (Tim O’Hara would never have imagined this happening outside of sitcom TV.) Just a few weeks after landing, the MERs—Spirit and Opportunity—discovered that at least some areas of Mars were once water-soaked. In fact, scientists later concluded that Mars may have had lakes or even an ocean. There is much data still to be studied.

All of this talk of Mars and probes got me thinking about Mozy and the Mozy Data Shuttle service. When you need to back up your servers, the Mozy Data Shuttle can do it quickly. No telepathy or levitation required. If you have a server with 100 GB of data or more, the initial upload can seem to take forever, as if it’s 140,000,000 miles away. The Mozy Data Shuttle service provides a super-fast way of getting your data to Mozy’s data centers. Here’s how it works:

You order a Data Shuttle device from Mozy. We’ll overnight it to you (in a really cool box). You do the initial backup to the shuttle device. Put it back in the box and ship it to our data center (note: no propellant required—our shuttle is postage-paid). That’s it! You’ve skipped the initial upload over the wire. Incremental backups can even occur before the shuttle arrives to Mozy, so long as the initial backup to the Data Shuttle is complete. Shuttles are available from 1.8 TB to 7.2 TB.

We may not be able to read your mind, but we can back up your files quickly, without raising antennae.

For more information about Mozy’s space program, visit our Mozy Data Shuttle Service page.