Category Archives: links

Technically Speaking: Stories of the Week – April 1

Each week we scour the internet to find the best stories on technology, digital living and news of note. This week features a new phone charger that’s slim enough to fit into wallets, apps that help you hail cabs, and a 5-foot jellyfish robot. All that and more in this edition of Mozy’s Technically Speaking.

A Five-foot Jellyfish? Good thing it’s Only a Robot 

Robot Jellyfish - Surveillance Tool

As if people don’t find regular jellyfish pesky enough, Virginia Tech researchers have created a 5-foot robot version that can autonomously patrol oceans for surveillance and environmental monitoring, according to UPI.com. The robo-jellyfish has been named “Cyro” and was developed as part of a multi-university, nationwide $5 million project funded by U.S. Naval Undersea Warfare Center and the Office of Naval Research. According to the article the goal is to “create self-powering, autonomous machines that can travel the world’s ocean for surveillance, monitoring the environment, studying aquatic life, mapping ocean floors and monitoring ocean currents.”

Study Shows Facebook Users Check Facebook 14 Times a Day

How many times have you checked Facebook from your phone today? 5? 10? 15? A recent study by the analytics firm IDC shows that people check Facebook on their phones on an average of 14 times a day, according to NBC News. And Facebook wasn’t even the most checked application, according to the study; it was email. Also, the group surveyed said they spent about two-and-a-half hours a day on their phones. Almost half the group (44 percent) used their phones as an alarm clock, and 79 percent checked their phones within the first 15 minutes of waking up

Having Babies with Three Biological Parents May Soon Be Possible

As a child it was pretty tough to sneak things by two parents. Now things might get even more difficult. CBS New York reports that new technology that would bring babies into the world with three biological parents is close to being legalized in the United Kingdom. The main goal behind the technology is to be able to prevent mitochondrial disorders. The British public overall has supported the technology, according to published reports, but lawmakers have yet to make a decision on whether doctors can use it.

This New Phone Charger is So Slim it Will Fit in Your Wallet

Chargecard Wallet Cell Phone Charger

Finally there’s an answer for techies on the go who are tired of their cell phones running out of batteries. And it doesn’t require lugging around a a phone charger–well, at least not one of normal proportions. The ChargeCard, an invention that turned up on the site Kickstarter, is a USB phone charger that can fit in a wallet as easy as a credit card, says Seth Porges. The charger easily slips into a wallet, but some people are even finding that it fits between their phones and cases.

Use One of These Apps to Hail Yourself a Cab

Tired of missing out on cabs all the time in your nearest city? Luckily, there are several apps for smartphones and devices that can help you get your next taxi or ride share. This week, a post on the Mozy blog profiles Hailo in New York City and TechHive’s Caitlin McGarry breaks downUber, Side Car, and Lyft. Whether you’re looking for a yellow cab, a limo, or simply to get in the HOV lane, these apps make coordinating a ride easier than ever.

 

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Technically Speaking: Stories of the Week – April 1

Each week we scour the internet to find the best stories on technology, digital living and news of note. This week features 47-inch touch-screen navigation systems coming to New York, tweeting churchgoers, and a smart watch battle.  All that and more in this edition of Mozy’s Technically Speaking.

Huge Navigation Touch Screens Coming to NYC Subway

New York City officials are trying to make it a lot easier for people to reach their destinations without getting lost. According to CNET, the New York City Metropolitan Transit Authority is collaborating with the Control Group, a technology and design agency, to provide 47-inch touch-screen kiosks with detailed maps of the city to be used in the subway system. The kiosks will feature interactive maps, alerts, and service announcements, according to the article, and up to 90 of them will be installed this year.

Would You Skype Your Wedding? 49 Percent of Brides Say They Would

Gone are the days of having a wedding with a single photographer. Technology is taking over in the wedding world, says Sherri L. Smith for Mashable. The article discusses how recent studies have shown that brides are very willing to use an abundance of technology when they say “I do.” While 49 percent said they wouldn’t mind having their ceremony being shown on Skype, 59 percent used Facebook to find or share wedding ideas, 68 percent took and shared photos of dress fittings and other preparation, and 59 percent update Facebook with their new name within one day of the wedding. As for Bachelor and Bachelorette parties, photos and video from those seem to be a little harder to come by.

Reverend Encourages Churchgoers to Tweet During Sermon

In the past most churches would frown at the use of cell phones during services. But Rev. Patrick Mead, senior pastor at Eastside Church of Christ in Colorado Springs is embracing the use of social media and technology. The reverend encourages his parishioners to Tweet or send Facebook messages out during his sermons, writes Stephanie Earls. And Eastside Church of Christ isn’t the only one using, or encouraging the use of social media among its congregation. More and more church leaders are turning to social media to spread the word of God, share information and to woo new members.

Will the Smart Watch be the New Tech Craze? Apple and Samsung Think So


It’s official: the smart watch is the next big thing: at least in the eyes of  tech giants. Apple and Samsung. Reports surfaced earlier this month that Apple was working on a new iWatch, but details were scarce. Since then, Samsung has also announced plans to develop its own version of a smartwatch, according to Doug Gross of CNN. Of course Samsung isn’t releasing any details either, so no one knows the features, cost, or even look of the new devices. The smart watch may be the latest  product in the “wearable technology” trend that has most recently included Google Glass.

 

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Technically Speaking: Stories of the Week – March 25

Each week we scour the internet to find the best stories on technology, digital living and news of note. This week features tips for finding free Wi-Fi, the hashtag taking over Facebook, license plate readers with an eye on Manhattan, and the slimmest television you’ve ever seen. All that and more in this edition of Mozy’s Technically Speaking.

Just When You Thought Televisions Couldn’t Get Any Thinner…

Philips Designline Promo Image

Philips’ new DesignLine television may look more like a slab of glass than an actual TV, but the company has managed to create the product without any stands, necks, bezels, or other “eyesores”. The television, designed by TP Vision, is made to just lean against the wall. (A wall-mount option is also available.) The product is said to be ready for launch in the United Kingdom in June, but no word yet on a U.S. release. Caleb Denison of Digital Trends says the DesignLine set will have 1080p resolution; LED edge lightning; active shutter 3D technology with 2-player full-screen gaming’ a remote control with full keyboard and “pointer”; 4 HDMI, 3 USB, Wi-Fi, Ethernet inputs; Smart TV apps; USB recording; and Smart sharing features.

Find Free Wi-Fi Wherever You Go

You may have a secret or two up your sleeve when it comes to getting free Wi-Fi. After all, most people want to be able to email and access important documents in the cloud with smartphones, tablets or laptops no matter where they are or what they are doing. USA Today has some help for those that are regularly working on the go. They put together a list of 5 ways to find surefire, ways to locate free Wi-Fi no matter where you are going. The methods include “thinking outside the Wi-Fi box,” “join hotel loyalty programs and use coupons,” “tap into Wi-Fi databases,” “free Wi-Fi access from your cable company,” and “tether your phone.”

License Plate Readers to Help NYPD Track All Cars Entering Manhattan

High Tech NYPD

The sky in New York might soon be blue every day, even when it’s overcast outside. It might not be long before drivers won’t be able to enter or leave New York City without being recorded. As Matt Sledge of Huffington Post reports, city officials plan to install license plate reader cameras in all lanes of roads leading into, and out of, Manhattan. The license plate readers will scan all license plate numbers and record information about the car and time of travel to a database. While privacy advocates are steaming over what they see as a violation of rights, those in favor of the technology are saying it could help prevent terrorist attacks.

Will the Hashtag be One of Facebook’s Newest Features?

Known for it’s use on the popular social media site Twitter, the Hashtag may be making its way across platform lines. According to The Wall Street Journal, Facebook is working on incorporating the hashtag into its users’ experience. Like Twitter, it would be designed to help group together conversations. Facebook is also doing research on other ways the hashtag might be used. It is still not clear whether the move will be definite, and details are still being ironed out, but hashtags on Facebook is a real possibility, according to the article. Look for the news to spark even more competition between to two social media giants.

Fans of Google Reader Fight to Save the Program from Imminent Shutdown

In case you haven’t already heard, Google has decided to pull the plug on its Google Reader feature. Upset about the impending shutdown, users have come together to create a petition and gather more than 100,000 signatures in hopes of saving the program, according to The Next Web, which has the entire petition available for reading. According to the article, those fighting the good fight shouldn’t hold out much hope though, as Google appears to be firm on it’s stance to cut its Reader feature, perhaps by the end of the month.

 

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Technically Speaking: Stories of the Week – March 18

Each week we scour the internet to find the best stories on technology, digital living and news of note. This week features an art exhibit displaying Pac-Man and Tetris, a 5-year-old spending $2,500 on an iPad game in 10 minutes, and Google Glass going for a new look. All that and more in this edition of Mozy’s Technically Speaking.

Museum of Modern Art Exhibit Showcases Classic Video Games

Retro Video Game Exhibit

Playing Tetris and Pac-Man were a huge part of growing up for some people, and now some are actually being considered pieces of art. (Apologies if this makes you feel old.) PC Mag reports that 14 video games have been chosen to be showcased in the Museum of Modern Art’s Applied Design installation as part of a 100 object exhibit representing contemporary design. Also included with the video games are 3-D printed chairs and an app that culls data from the National Digital Forecast database to render a living portrait of the U.S. wind landscape. Video games being displayed include Pac-Man (1980), Tetris (1984), Myst (1993), SimCity 2000 (1994), Dwarf Fortress (2006), and Portal (2007).

Grounded for Life? 5-Year Old Racks Up $2500 in Ipad Charges in Just 10 Minutes

Note to parents: don’t leave your 5-year old alone with an iPad–even if it is just for a few minutes. A story out of Warmley, England this week is that a child asked his parents to play with the iPad for just a few minutes. He wanted to play the game Zombies vs. Ninja, reports CNET’s Chris Matyszczyk. The parents didn’t think anything of it. The game is free (at least up front) and it would occupy their son for the time being. The problem: while the game is free to play, there are several add-ons, like weapons, that you can purchase to give your character a boost. Well, the young boy decided he wanted quite a boost for his character. So much so that he spent $2,500 on the game in 10 minutes.

Company Allows Users to Watch Commercials to Save Money

The company Hitbliss, which sells streaming movies and television shows much like Netflix, has developed a new idea for how customers can make payments: watch ads in place of paying your bill. According to Forbes, this could be the future of ad-supported content. On Hitbliss users have the option of paying for a movie or television show or watching 30-second ads to build up credit on their account. Most of the time customers are able to watch a movie or show after viewing approximately a minute or two of commercials. Or they can just skip the ads and fork up the dough. Which would you prefer?

Can Google Glass Become Fashionable?

Can Google Glasses Be made Fashionable?

There is a ton of hype in the tech community around the launch of Google Glass, a new invention that allows people to always have the Internet within their line of sight–all they have to do is wear a pair of glasses. These aren’t your ordinary glasses though; they come complete with a battery, a computer processor, and a tiny screen. Realizing it’s probably not the most fashionable look out there, Google has reached out to Warby Parker, a startup known for selling trendy eyeglasses, says Clair Cain Miller of the New York Times.

Stressed about Having to do Taxes? Try One of These Apps 

It’s the time of the year when most people are either working on their tax returns or paying a professional to do it for them. Thanks to the evolution of technology, doing your own taxes may not be as difficult as you think. Jeff Reeves of USA Today goes over the top five apps for getting taxes done. And the best part? Some of them are free.

 

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Technically Speaking: Stories of the Week – March 18

Each week we scour the internet to find the best stories on technology, digital living and news of note. This week features Facebook planning a whole new look, cloud and it’s potential impact on Healthcare, and a law that would prevent texting while walking. All that and more in this edition of Mozy’s Technically Speaking.

Nevada isn’t Tripping: New Law Would Prohibit Texting While Walking

Potential New Texting Laws in Nevada

While many states are still fighting to get people to stop texting while driving, Nevada would like to put a new law on the books that would force people to keep their hands free while walking as well. Edwin Kee of Ubergizmo reports that Las Vegas Councilman Harvey Mumford has proposed a law that would prohibit pedestrians from texting while walking on state roads, intersections, and neighborhoods. The reasoning behind the law, according to the article, would be so people don’t bumb into other walkers, walk into manholes, or cross highways without paying attention. If the law is indeed put into place, the first two offenses would result in warnings, while the third offense would cost someone a $250 fine.

How Cloud May Change the Face of Healthcare

Cloud computing is known to improve aspects of many industries, and the latest one being talked about is healthcare and patient care in particular. While cloud has been approached with care thus far in the industry, according to Jake Gardner of Wired, it could eventually be one of the technologies to help lower healthcare spending and associated costs. The Affordable Care Act (also known as Obamacare) is changing the processes that organizations use for Healthcare–look for cloud to take on a more prominent role moving forward.

Startup Rents Out Children’s Books in Netflix-like Service

Sproutkin

The new company Sproutkin has taken Netflix’s idea of delivering entertainment right to your doorstep, but they’ve put their own twist on it. The founder, a lawyer with two children, came up with the idea out of necessity because she was reading to her kids every night and getting low on material, according to TechCrunch. Sproutkin is currently available for parents of children ages 3 to 6, and users are allowed to get up to 10 books at a time.

Sophisticated Software for Retail Stores Tracks Customer Movements

As retailers try to track which products in their stores are attracting the most customers, many of them are turning to state-of-the-art technology from San Francisco startup Prism Skylabs. Sumi Das of CNET reports that the software takes security camera footage and uses it to track customer movements and create “heatmaps.” The images show the retailers where the shoppers went throughout the store, and which items they came into contact with. Retailers use the technology to determine product placement and floor layout.

Facebook to Get Major Facelift

Big changes are in store for the popular social media site Facebook, as the company has announced plans for a complete makeover of it’s homepage, according to The New York Times. Users of the site will start seeing much bigger photos, links, photos and advertisements. The company’s co-founder and chief executive is quoted as saying he wants Facebook to be “the best personalized newspaper in the world.” Facebook is hoping the changes encourage users to stay on the site longer and help bring in more advertising dollars. No official launch date has been set, but the end of March has been mentioned as a possibility.

Technically Speaking: Stories of the Week – March 6

Each week we scour the internet to find the best stories on technology, digital living and news of note. This week features a computer allowing users to reach into the screen, a new app that helps drivers find open parking spaces, and a look back at the Mobile Word Congress and the top items on display. All that and more in this edition of Mozy’s Technically Speaking.

3-D Computing Prototype Literally Puts Users Inside the Computer

3D Computer

A futuristic device known as Spacetop may be a glimpse of what the future of computing holds.Though it may not be completed for quite some time, NBC News Reports that it, allows the user to work in a 3-D environment through a transparent display. Users then move around the elements on screen with their hands. Experts aren’t sure whether this is a type of computing that could actually become commonplace, but it was a huge hit at the recent TED conference where it was on display.

RSA Conference Forecast – 100 Percent Chance of Cloud

Cloud security is growing and developing so quickly that more and more industries are starting to take notice. According to John Fontana of ZDNet, this week’s RSA Conference—a cryptography and information security-related conference, will kickoff with a summit from the Cloud Security Alliance (CSA), which now has approximately 45,000 members. Among the topics being discussed at the summit is the spread of cloud technology across the world and how it is forcing enterprises to focus on security from a variety of angles.

New App May Have Answer for Big City Parking Hassles 

Finding parking in a big city can be quite the headache. However, the recently released app Park.It is quickly making a name for itself as it helps drivers to find open parking spaces and avoid costly tickets. Right now the app only covers the city of San Francisco, however New York and Washington, D.C. versions will be available soon, says Katherine Bindley of Huffington Post Tech. Park.It shows users where legal spaces are located in the area they are driving in, and notifies them if they have parked in an illegal area.

A Look at the Top Products From Mobile World Congress

Mobile World Conference

The biggest mobile conference of the year MWC (Mobile World Congress) 2013 took place last week and Ubergizmo has a wrap-up of some of the top products on display. MWC is a chance for all the big-name tech companies to showoff products being released sometime in the near future.

 

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Technically Speaking: Stories of the Week – March 1

Each week we scour the internet to find the best stories on technology, digital living and news of note. This week, we have Google going retail, t-shirts going biometric and a 3D printer helping a child overcome disability. All that and more in this week’s edition of Mozy’s Technically Speaking.

5 Year Old with Disability Recipient of “Robohand” 

Liam and his Robot Hand

A 5-year-old boy born without fingers was the recipient of a new robohand this week, thanks to new technology and a remarkable collaboration. The robohand, “an open-sourced device built with customized prosthetic fingers,” according to Mashable’s Camille Bautista, was built using 3D printing. The duo that created the device live across the world from each other (one in Washington state, the other in South Africa) and used Skype to communicate and share ideas.

Coming to a Shopping Mall Near You: Google Stores

One of the companies you’re used to seeing all over the web may soon be all over your local shopping malls as well. Venture Beat reports that Google plans to launch its own retail stores just in time for the 2013 holiday season. The move could be considered an attempt to compete with Apple, which currently operates 400 stores in 12 countries, according to the article. The Google stores will feature the company’s products, like the new Chromebook, and will also have employees offering technical support, similar to what Apple does.

President Obama Urges Schools to Focus More on Technology

President Obama mentioned technology in his State of the Union Address last week, saying that he would like to see schools “meet the demands of a high-tech economy.” The President suggested that schools focusing more on technology—and subjects like science, engineering, and math—would be rewarded. While exciting people who have been pushing for more coding to be taught in schools, implementation may be an uphill battle. According to Forbes’ Anthony Wing Kosner, schools face challenges such as a lack of computer science teachers and time in their current daily schedules.

Under Armour Working on Technology for Touchscreen Tees

Technology and exercise have become fast friends. Smartphones are now valuable devices for workouts, as several apps and features have emerged to help motivate and keep track of miles, time, weight, and more. But what if you didn’t need your phone at all? If Under Armour’s vision comes true, all of that technology might be available right on a person’s arm—in the fabric of the shirt they’re wearing. Ryan Gearhardt for Mashable writes that, while the idea hasn’t been perfected yet, the company is hard at work on developing “wearable” technology, or touchscreen shirts.

 

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Link Round-Ups – October 29

Apple Unwraps New iPad at Big Event

For Apple, less is more.

Apple took the wraps off its much-anticipated downsized version of its iPad tablet, the 7.9-inch iPad mini, at an event in San Jose, Calif. Oct. 23.

Apple also revealed a 4th-generation 9.7-inch iPad, and updated versions of it Mac computers: a 13-inch MacBook Pro with Retina display, a revised Mac Mini and the next generation iMac, according to an article on Businessweek.com.

With Amazon having shipped millions of 7-inch Kindle Fire tablets and Google estimated to have shipped at least a million Nexus 7 tablets, according to Piper Jaffray analyst Gene Munster, Apple couldn’t afford to cede a growing market to competitors.

“We sold more iPads in the June quarter than any PC manufacturer sold of their entire PC lineup,” said CEO Tim Cook. The iPad, he said, has been hugely popular in education and is “taking the business market by storm. … We’re not taking our foot off the gas.”

Google Takes Its Trekker Street View Cameras to Grand Canyon

Grand CanyonHey Google, go take a hike.

Google is currently taking pictures for Google Maps in a place where no vehicle has gone before — the rugged hiking paths of the Grand Canyon.

According to an article on Techcrunch.com, a Google team is on foot to capture the landscape’s panoramic views to add them to Google Maps. The move is a part of a greater effort to capture images beyond the streets. Google recently added images of landscapes from the Amazon and Antarctica to university campuses and ancient ruins.

To capture the area, the team is using wearable backpacks with a camera system on top.

“The narrow ridges and steep, exposed trails of the Grand Canyon provide the perfect terrain for our newest camera system,” Google said on its official blog. “The Trekker—which its operator controls via an Android phone and automatically gathers photos as he walks—enables the collection of high-quality imagery from places that are only accessible on foot.”

Scientists: Whale Was Trying to Imitate Human Speech

Whale I’ll be.

A white beluga whale in California has grabbed the world’s attention due to its ability to imitate the human voice. According to Discovery News, the whale named NOC was caught on audio speaking English.

“I think he was looking for feedback,” Sam Ridgway, president of the National Marine Mammal Foundation (NMMF) in San Diego, said in an interview with NBCNews.com. “These animals make a lot of sound, and they like feedback.”

One day, a diver surfaced from the tank and asked, “Who told me to get out?” At that moment researchers realized the sound came from their captive Beluga whale, named NOC. Researchers concluded NOC was mimicking the word “out.”

Scientists have long studied the ability of whales to imitate human sound. Their findings were recently published in Current Biology, concluding that the sounds they had heard were several octaves lower than typical whale sounds. The whales were actually trying to imitate humans, their research revealed.

The research revealed a pitch and amplitude rhythm in NOC’s voice that is comparable to human speech. As noted by Ridgway, the talking beluga spent long periods in close contact with humans, listening to them from both above and below the surface.

 

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Cloud Link Roundup – October 22

Samsung Launching Galaxy S III Mini

Samsung Vs. AppleWhen it comes to challenging Apple’s iPhone, Samsung is thinking small. The South Korean conglomerate is currently working on a smaller version of its popular Galaxy S III smartphone.

The new phone, which Samsung did not reveal when it will launch in the United States or at what price it will be, is likely targeting Apple’s newest iPhone, according to the Washington Post.

The smartphone, expected to be called, appropriately, the Galaxy S III mini, has a 4-inch screen — smaller than the 4.8-inch screen on the current iteration of the Galaxy S III smartphone but the same size as the display on the iPhone 5.

That’s not the only difference between this phone and its larger, 4.8-inch sibling. According to a specifications sheet from Samsung, the mini smartphone has a 5 megapixel camera instead of the 8 megapixel sensor on the larger phone, and it will also not operate on high-speed 4G LTE networks. That decision makes the device more of a mid-range phone, as many customers expect premium smartphones to connect to the fastest networks, according to the Washington Post.

The S III mini’s crisp Super AMOLED screen and general design borrows from the company’s top-selling smartphone. It has a 1GHZ dual-core processor and will run the latest version of Google’s Android system, Jelly Bean.

Browser Tools Can Help Block Tracking by Social Networks

The “like” button on Facebook and other social widgets on websites that track your online activity now face a growing number of startups that offer tools to keep them in check.

According to The New York Times, those little buttons on websites that let you share what you’ve read have an equally important function: They let the social networks track your travels on the Web, whether or not you click on them.

Now, a growing number of start-ups offer tools that help consumers keep that kind of tracking at bay.

Social widgets that track your moves are growing across the Web. They act as eyes on the Web. They watch you as you skim the day’s news or shop online.

According to The Times, Facebook is especially ubiquitous. Academic researchers in France and Australia recently found that more than 20 percent of the 10,000 most popular Web sites have a Facebook widget. That widget allows the social networking giant to keep track of which Web sites they visit, whether or not the Internet user is logged on to Facebook at the time.

But users do have options when it comes to keeping widgets in check.

One such tool is a widget-scrubbing program recently released by PrivacyChoice. It is a browser extension that monitors the strength of your privacy settings on Facebook and Google, including the option of disabling Facebook and Google Plus share buttons. In the first 24 hours after its release, 50,000 people used the tool, which the company calls PrivacyFix and offers for free.

Woman Gets 11,100 Trillion Euro Phone Bill

Trillion Euro Cell Phone BillA woman in France might want to look into free nights and weekends.

Solenne San Jose received an 11,100 trillion euro phone bill, which was eventually fixed after her phone company admitted that it made a mistake (and people say there’s just no talking to some phone-service providers).

According to the Epoch Times, San Jose said that when she opened up her mail, her phone bill had some extra zeroes. About 12 extra zeroes. Her bill totaled 11,721,000,000,000,000 euros ($15,100 trillion).

“There were so many zeroes I couldn’t even work out how much it was,” Solenne San Jose of the Bordeaux region told the AFP news agency.

Bouygues Telecom, her phone company, told her that they could not revoke the computer-generated bill or stop the balance from being subtracted from her bank account.

Finally, San Jose was able to convince the company to admit the problem, according to the news agency. The bill was actually only 117.21 euros ($151).

Image Credit: Apple iPhone 4s vs Samsung Galaxy note / sidduz / CC BY 2.0

 

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Links of Interest – Oct 10

Apple Maps Inspires Brilliant (but Fake) New Yorker Cover

Leave it to the Mad men over at Mad Magazine to put Apple in its place over its second-rate Apple Maps effort.

The minds at Mad took illustrator Saul Steinberg’s famous New Yorker cover from 1976, showing the world as seen from Manhattan’s 9th Avenue, and gave it the Apple Maps treatment, see here on Gothamist.com.

Apple has recently taken flak for its often-incorrect mapping application in its new iOS 6, and Google has wasted no time letting mobile users know that its maps service can be found on the web and will soon be available in a native iOS app.

Google made its Street View service available in mobile browsers. To access Street View panoramic imagery, Google advises people to visit maps.google.com using a mobile device and then search for a location.

Bee Brains Help to Make Robots Smarter

One particular study in the UK is creating quite the buzz.

Researchers there are studying how bees smell and perceive the world in a project that hopes to produce a simulation of the winged creatures’ sensory systems.

The simulated bee brain will be used by a flying robot to help it make decisions about how to navigate safely, according to the BBC.

Robots involved in the project could help in search-and-rescue missions or work in agriculture by mechanically pollinating crops.

The research involves scientists from the Universities of Sheffield and Sussex. The project aims to create models of the neural systems in a bee’s brain that helps it make sense of what it sees and smells, according to the BBC.

James Marshall, a computer scientist at the University of Sheffield who is coordinating the project, said simulating a brain was one of the “major challenges” of artificial intelligence.

Many previous attempts to re-create biological brains in silicon have focused on the cognitive systems found in humans, monkeys and mice, he said.

Study Shows Baldness Can Be a Business Advantage

Baldness, a business advantage?Don’t perfect that comb-over just yet.

According to a recent study from the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School, men with shaved domes may seem more powerful because the look is associated with hypermasculine images, such as the military, professional athletes and Hollywood action heroes such as Bruce Willis.

The study goes on to reveal men with shaved heads are perceived to be more masculine, dominant and, in some cases, to have greater leadership potential than those with longer locks or with thinning hair, according to the Wall Street Journal.

Some executives say the look makes them appear younger and gives them more confidence than a comb-over.

“I’m not saying that shaving your head makes you successful, but it starts the conversation that you’ve done something active,” said Seth Godin, 52, a smooth-headed tech entrepreneur and writer who embraces the bare look. “These are people who decide to own what they have, as opposed to trying to pretend to be something else.”

No word yet on what sort of advantage a mullet brings to the boardroom.

 

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