Category Archives: Small Business

Phantom Charges: Small Ways that Tech Savvy SMBs Can Rack Up Big Savings

Phantom Charges: Small Ways that Tech Savvy SMBs Can Rack Up Big SavingsFor small-business owners, every square foot of office space and every piece of equipment is part of how money is made. But it’s also how business dollars get spent.

Overhead is a daily reality for small businesses. In fact, when it comes to utilities and human resources — it’s an hourly reality. And any way to trim that overhead is key to driving success.

One strategy, when it comes to controlling overhead, is to tackle the “phantom charge”. These are the incremental, often small, expenses — and also the missed savings —  that add up every year.

What follow are five such “phantoms”, ones that you can tackle right away with some advice from the experts at LivingPlug.

1. Stop Phantom Electrical Costs: Your printers, copiers, and other devices and appliances still draw energy, even when they’re not in use. For example, a desktop computer in sleep mode costs nearly $22 per year. Printers run at least $6 annually. Multiplied by the number of devices in your shop, storefront, or offices, this can really add up. The good news is that you can control it by simply unplugging, powering down, or implementing “smart” outlet devices that limit that passive draw.

2. Utilize Automatic Cloud Storage: The data that small businesses generate demands attention. Safe, secure, and frequent backups are key to ensuring your future — but staying on top of the tasks associated with that kind of rigorous backup takes time. And time is money. So, automate your backup to the cloud with a service that automatically grabs all user-generated content and stores it.

3. Benefit from Mileage Tax Deduction: Don’t let the money you stand to save by deducting business-related travel from your taxes pass you by. A device like CarCheckup helps business owners track mileage. Simply plug it into the onboard diagnostic port.

4. Stop Wasting Billable Staff Hours: Small businesses are often plagued by wasted time on phone calls to vendors and providers. Systems that feature endless wait times and phone trees eat up the hours you’re paying for as an owner. Implement an app such as FastCustomer. This helps eliminate that time-suck by navigating those phone trees and ringing your employee back when customer service is actually on the line.

5. Replace Store-Bought with In-House Treats: It is widely known that free food and drinks make for happy employees. But, forgo soda purchases at the grocery store and make your own lower-cost, high-quality in-house treats with a gadget like the SodaStream. The results are not only tasty and typically better for you, but your office will save about about $720 per year for a staff of four (and another feel-good benefit is that your office will also produce less waste).

Time and money, and missed savings. From the way we power our printers to the care we take when tracking business expenses, make this the year you eliminate the phantom charge — in all its incarnations.

 

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The Small-Business Report Card: Mid-Year 2013

Small Business Report CardFor small-business owners, the key issue this mid-year is economic growth. Everything else remains a secondary consideration in mid 2013, and some of the numbers are surprising.

Even as Congressional Republicans met during the dog days of July to consider immigration reform, only 3% of owners polled in a new Rocket Lawyer survey said that the matter was a top priority for the country. And, surprisingly, a mere 10% tagged healthcare and the still-evolving reality of healthcare exchanges to be a major factor for them in the past six months.

Economic and small-business growth, however, remained at the top of the list.

Nearly half (43%) of the owners polled said it was the main concern they held for the remainder of 2013, and more than half (55%) said that their small business had grown — or even boomed — during the first part of the year.

Let’s look a little closer at some of these numbers, especially at those surrounding issues that one might have expected to be higher up among owner’s concerns.

Health Care and Immigration: Where SMBs Stand

The healthcare stats tell us that there are two things going on among the more than 1,000 owners who participated in the poll: (1) awareness versus non-awareness of the issues is about evenly split (2) a surprising number of owners who are aware aren’t especially concerned about the outcomes of these matters.

  • Just more than 50% said they are aware of the new healthcare exchanges geared toward small businesses.
  • When it comes to the Affordable Care Act, 59% who are paying attention to it say they believe the legislation will increase employee healthcare costs. However, 29% said it will have no effect.

Immigration issues seem to be more squarely in the radar, but there’s still a remarkable suggestion of ambivalence about the outcome — at least according to the numbers that came back.

  • Some 64% of respondents said they are aware of the immigration reform plan.
  • 23% of respondents said they support reform.
  • 28% claimed they do not support the reform proposal.
  • Nearly 50% said they do not know how they feel about the issue.

The Mobile Equation

What owners did seem sure about: mobile tech is become firmly entrenched in the way that they do business. Close to half (47%) said they use mobile apps every day for business purposes. Within those respondents, the answers break out further along demographics of age.

  • Gen Y (ages 18-30) and Gen X (ages 31-47) reported the highest rates of mobile use: 62% and 58%, respectively, say they use mobile apps every day for business.
  • Only 27% of those ages 67+ say they use mobile daily.

Finally, optimism about what respondents maintain is the main issue this year — growth — seems to be on the rise. That is, 74% of the respondents said they were hopeful for an even better second half of 2013.

“This is good news,” said Charley Moore, founder and executive chairman of Rocket Lawyer. “Main Street businesses are increasingly optimistic and focused on growth.”

 

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Mobile Pay and the SMB: 3 Tips for Now, How, and the Future

The Future of Mobile PayMobile payment is a new idea for many small-business owners. From the farm stand to the conference floor, swipe technology that turns smartphones and tablets into virtual cash registers stands to become the new norm, but implementing the apps and making sense of the process still represents a learning curve.

Like small business itself, the tech isn’t standing still, either. Magnetic stripes are on their way out, some say. Chip-and-PIN devices are picking up steam, say others. One thing’s for certain: it’s important to stay current with the latest mobile-pay possibilities and the best practices that go with them.

With some expert help, we take a look at the now, how, and future of mobile payment — a tip-sheet to help put your SMB on the cutting edge.

Mobile Payment: Getting Started (and Getting It Right)

“The U.S. is a great market for mobile payments,” said Dan Wagner, founder and chief executive officer of Powa.

Wagner offered the following ideas for implementing and refining the technology within the small-business environment, from day one to the point that even more sophisticated choices come into play.

  • Get out there. First, embrace the mobile payment idea as a strategy for growth. Mobile-payment technology is revolutionising the way small businesses can approach their clientele. “The idea is to mobilize your sales team and do business where your customers are, not where your registers have always been,” Wagner said. That is, mobile payments shouldn’t be a reactive addition to your business — something you implement just to keep up. It needs to drive the way you do business, going forward.
  • Trade differently. One example of driving the way you do business is to use mobile phones and tablets to extend your trading capability in-shop. Mobile payment can eliminate daunting line-time for customers during busy periods. They’re easy to bring out as second points-of-sale in an unexpectedly busy afternoon and multiple devices can be deployed by a number of staff over a predictably busy period, whether it’s Valentine’s Day for a florist or Christmas for a toy store.
  • Adapt (and Adopt). There are many different options out there, but one deciding factors should be compatibility. Be compatible; as magnetic stripe cards begin a phasing out process, investing in a mobile payments device that only accepts magnetic stripes will mean you could be left with an outdated piece of equipment. Small-business owners should also resist the temptation to invest in technology for the short term. Wagner expects that chip-and-PIN and near-field communication transactions — already common in Europe — are expected to become prevalent in the U.S. by 2015. Choose an interface that stands to stick around for longer than a few quarters.

Lastly, do your homework. The cost of taking transactions is another major issue that will affect your choice, Wagner cautioned. Some mobile payment devices charge considerably higher rates than others, so shop around before putting down your cash.

 

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The New Vacation: The Always-Connected Employee (and Why Employers Should Pay Attention)

Employees Working on VacationVacation is supposedly a time for relaxation and rejuvenation away from the office, but a new survey of more than 1,000 U.S. employees suggests that we’re not feeling very good anymore when we unplug.

In fact, many of us are not unplugging from work while we’re away at all.

According to a new survey by networking company Pertino, nearly one half of Americans say they are less stressed on vacation when they are connected to the office. And so, nearly 60% of the polled employees confessed that they regularly work — check e-mail, take calls, etc. — while on vacation.

So, if this is the new normal in our mobile-connected world, let’s look at how Americans are staying in touch with the office this summer, and what that means for the business owners for whom they work.

Employee Vacations Have Changed

One reason that employees work from vacation is that mobile tech has made the office only a click or swipe away.

In fact, 36% of the employees polled said that the beach was their office while on vacation, thanks largely to the ever present smartphone and tablet. Combined, these devices account for 81% of the ways workers connect when it comes to putting in hours from their vacation spots.

And while many are working from the locations where they’re supposed to be relaxing, the numbers tip a bit in terms of who is doing all this extra-office labor.

  • 64% of the men polled said they logged in from vacation.
  • 57% of the women polled said that working from vacation was now a norm.

The Vacation Security Problem: Why Business Owners Should Care

One problem with all of this remote connectivity is not so much that business owners are against the productivity that it breeds, but it’s that the way these employees are logging on can pose a threat. Here’s what the survey revealed about that:

  • 32% of work-from-vacation employees are using unsanctioned or unsecured cloud-file sharing services to access business-related data.
  • 35% of the employees in the survey are simply taking their devices away, loaded with important business files.

Neither of these are scenarios that small-business owners or IT departments want to face.

Rule one, when it comes to vacationing employees and remote access: your business’s policy has to be that they only log in via networks that provide authentication and encryption of traffic over public Wi-Fi and the Internet.

The Healthy Employee: Division of Labor and Play

Beyond the potential of compromised data, another overarching problem of employees working from vacation is that, long-term, they’re courting burnout.

What to do? Encourage healthy vacation habits when it comes to working off the clock.

If it’s almost impossible for many employees, especially senior managers and IT pros, to completely unwind while away, then a key to getting relaxed can sometimes be to not unplug.

But vacationing employees should instead develop a schedule that segregates work and play times. Communicate this division of hours to your family and work associates, then keep to it. Set aside a designated time everyday to connect with office and then spend the rest of the time focused on fun in the sun.

 

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Data Visualization for SMBs: Helping Make Sense of ‘Little Data’

Data Visualization for SMBs: Helping Make Sense of 'Little Data'Small-business owners are tapping Big Data more than ever before, but their demand for new data-based insights doesn’t mean that they’re immune to the overwhelming effect that a plethora of options and a flood of fresh ideas can bring.

If your sales team wants to see customer data put to use, give it to them in ways that they can use it on the go. That’s the message owners are communicating, loud and clear. Big Data analysis, meet “little data” delivery. Let’s look at a recent study that shows what that can mean.

Recent Study: Big Data in a Smaller Package

A new report from data-interaction specialists at Roambi shows the explosion of demand for Big Data — and also for simple, mobile, and non-traditional ways to share, use, and assess all this information.

Start with the follow stats: while 83% of the business owners polled said they’d discovered surprising things about their business via Big Data, more than a third of the respondents simultaneously found the scale of of the material to be overwhelming and/or anxiety inducing.

Perhaps it’s no surprise, then, that the top three spending priorities among the business owners, in early 2013, turned out to be:

(1.) Data-visualization tools

(2.) Mobile hardware and software

(3.) Big Data solutions to business-intelligence questions

These three points come together in the following way: it’s data visualization tools that have taken the lead, in terms of mobile apps — second only to e-mail — among the respondents. Specifically, owners said they want new kinds of interactive charts and graphs to highlight what Big Data has to tell them.

Beyond that, what about how we use such tools? The following section takes a look at strategies for telling Big Data stories on a digestible scale.

Scaling Big Data: 3 Steps for Business Owners

Having the right tools, like the ones the Roambi study addressed, is one thing. But bringing Big Data to your next business project also requires some scaling steps on your part.

The following tips emphasize ways to reap the rewards, when it comes to Big Data’s surprising revelations, all the while scaling the experience to a team-friendly presentations and making them accessible business-wide.

— Quality Over Quantity: It’s tempting to cram every juicy statistic or important metric into one robust chart, but the end result can turn out cluttered and overwhelming. Remove redundant information, background colors, and 3D effects. Data visualization is meant to add clarity, not confusion. Know what story you want to tell and identify the specific data that will help convey your key messages and persuade your audience.

— Think for the Small Screen: Bear in mind that most presentations are opened up on mobile phones or tablets. Scroll through a 1,000-cell spreadsheet on your smartphone screen lately? Applications that are mobile-ready are more affordable than ever, so explore and select ones that allow you convey your Big Data findings in bite-size and graphics-supported segments. Think mobile first.

— Take Your Data to the Cloud: Juggling multiple sources of data is enough to handle already, so take the burden out of management and bring your material to the cloud for secure, affordable, and convenient storage. Most of your key business apps are already in the cloud — it’s time for your data to catch up.

And so, the days of text reports, slideshows, and spreadsheets may be on the wane. The next generation of business intelligence demands new — read: mobile and cloud-based — tools that illustrate the trends and connections all this next-generation analysis can provide.

Data sets and the things they can do for business owners may be bigger than ever, but the way we absorb this information has to match that usefulness in your employees’ everyday lives.

 

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The SMB Will: How to Protect What You’ve Built

The Small Business WillLegacy is important. It’s crucial. It’s part of the reason we draft wills. And while it’s a given that caring for legacy is part of what we do when it comes to family, what about when it comes to the infrastructure and ideas that surround your small business?

“There’s a common misconception that a will is just about distributing financial assets,” said Charley Moore, founder of Rocket Lawyer. But company “owners also need ‘business-wills’ to make sure their businesses can live on, even if they don’t.”

Moore and his colleagues offered some advice on how to make a business will happen, highlighting estate-planning tips that owners can use.

  • Address Different Business Structures: When creating a business estate plan, understand the ramifications of the corporate structure you’ve selected. Sole proprietors, partnerships, LLCs, and S-corporations each present different legal challenges.

“It’s important to plan for both disability and death,” said Christopher Johnson, an estate-planning attorney who consults with Moore’s company. “For sole proprietorships and single-owner LLCs and corporations, make sure you’ve given thought to who could take over for you, and how they would do it. This can be done with durable powers of attorney and trusts, and making sure the agent or trustee can handle your business or hand it off to competent people.

“For entities with multiple owners, be sure you have a buy-sell agreement with the other owners and that it coordinates with your LLC operating agreement or corporation’s by-laws,” he said. “If you have an S-corporation, be sure to have ‘qualified subchapter S trust’ language in your trust to keep its tax status. And if you have a trust, be sure to transfer your company to the trust. You can use an assignment form, or re-issue the shares or units in the trust name.”

  • Create a Buy-Sell Agreement: This document details what happens should a principal member of the team leave the business, either voluntarily because of sickness or death.
  • Pick a Knowledgeable Heir: To protect your business in the future you need to designate a successor. Remember, no one knows your business better than you right now, but the next owner has to fill that role — so make sure the heir to your legacy has the smarts and know-how to run things in your place.
  • Death & Taxes: Whether you own your business yourself or share it with partners, consult an accountant, as the IRS offers tax breaks for death and estate taxes.

Digital Considerations

A new survey by Rocket Lawyer showed that 93% of those polled were unaware or misinformed about what would happen to their digital assets should they die.

Don’t leave the decisions about your business’s digital details to someone outside the loop. From your company’s Twitter account to the intellectual property sitting in your servers, each component of the increasingly cloud-based way we work is part of a well-crafted will.

 

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WiseRadar, your startup’s most important newspaper

WiseRadar AppIn the news! Yahoo acquires Qwiki, buys Bignoggins, and will live-stream this year’s Emmy Awards. But wait!

Ask yourself: Should I read this?

Unless you are Google, you probably can’t spare the time because it’s not relevant. For small business owners and entrepreneurs, there’s a new solution for filtering through all the noise in the news to discover the most relevant stories for your business.

Welcome, WiseRadar, “personalized news for the startup world.”

Founded by Jean Friesewinkel, a developer, engineer and former business consultant at Bain & Company, WiseRadar aggregates and curates news about your competitors, customers, and market into a simple, digestible email.

Users start with the first step, which is to “setup your radar.” You add competitors that WiseRadar will help monitor. The list of companies comes from the Crunchbase and AngelList directories, but you can also request to add unlisted businesses. Then, voila! What you do with the competitor news and your extra free time is up to you.

As the co-founder of Blank Label, a luxury menswear company, I decided to sign up for WiseRadar and give it a whirl. After I received beta access, I added nine businesses to my radar (WiseRadar recommends adding ten). Shortly afterwards, I received my first curated email digest.

The email begins with a friendly greeting, “Welcome, Danny! Your radar is up and running.” And then prefaces with:

To make the most of our beta, here are three things you should know:

  1. Morning reports. Your digests will arrive on weekdays at 7am, and will include up to 5 stories relevant to the companies you’ve added.
  2. No noise. We make it a principle to only send relevant stories. But if you don’t receive anything for a while and think you should have, please let us know!
  3. We’re here to help you. You can simply reply to your digests with questions or requests. We’re just getting started, and we’ll always be listening.

Below is your first digest. Enjoy!

The meaty part of the email included links to five stories about companies on my radar.

The first link was the only one that was truly relevant, although outdated — nearly four weeks old. The second story featured a new startup we had never heard of, which I shall soon add to my radar, and briefly mentioned a competitor I listed. The third and the fifth stories mentioned a competitor, but were irrelevant because they featured a business we didn’t care about. The fourth story came with a bad link.

Although my remarks seem critical, the fact is, the companies on my radar have been quiet lately. As a user of Google Alerts, to keep tabs on the competition, I have heard the crickets chirping over the past months.

Tools like WiseRadar, which aim to provide a more sophisticated version of Google Alerts, are important because they minimize the distraction that comes from too much news.

I am a reformed news junkie. When I first fell in love with startups back in 2009, I read every-and-any article TechCrunch published. And I was busier than I ever could have imagined. But being busy isn’t the same as being productive.

Getting caught up in the hype of news is one of the biggest traps small business owners and entrepreneurs fall into that leads to massive bouts of non-productivity. (Email is another.)

People, small business owners and entrepreneurs especially, are an emotional breed. We are attracted to news that shocks or ‘wows’ us. For this reason, catchy headlines from Mashable and picture slideshows from Business Insider easily fill up an afternoon that could have otherwise been used towards creating real value. When I came to this realization, I deleted the bookmarks on my web browser and started doing real work.

Simply put, read less news. You’ll be happier, and your business will thank you.

For beta access, apply with your LinkedIn at the WiseRadar website.

 

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Online Careers: What a Workforce of 1 Billion Means

Online Careers: What a Workforce of 1 Billion MeansA new study of the freelance workforce tells us that there are close to one billion freelancers and that number is growing.

And what’s driving that phenomenon? Productivity, competition for high-quality talent, and reduced hiring frictions.

All of this may be paving paving the way for a future full of “yes” when it comes to small-business employers. Freelance professionals are enjoying fresh attention in 2013.

“What is clear is that online freelancing appears to be an answer to worker happiness in terms of increased flexibility and quality of life, as well as to increased financial independence,” according to an annual impact report recently released by Elance. From what’s driving freelance and business choices to how those decisions are affecting bottom lines — here are some highlights of the study.

1. High Quality Talent Is an Attractor: In the past year alone, there has been a 153% increase in freelancers online with skills in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. That means that employers are increasingly likely get used to searching for the right individuals with the right skillsets in the digital space. The longer that goes, on the more entrenched the concept will become.

2. Online Workers Like Their Independence: Sixty-nine percent that answered the survey said they were happier when freelancing versus working in a traditional onsite job. The average freelancer estimates they have 28 more personal days than they did working in a corporate environment. This is another recipe for keeping the online workforce of 1 billion at those numbers or better. Appealing work environments bring new participants. That’s just intuitive.

3. Small-business Owners Perceive Online Searches as a Competitive Edge. Hiring freelance talent to fill part-time needs suggests a competitive edge to 85% of companies, the study said.

4. Reduced Hiring Friction Helps Bottom Lines: According to a new measure of Labor Department data, the average hiring time under traditional methods is 23 days. That’s time and effort on the part of HR, and that’s lost or negatively affected productivity when a position is left open. By some measures, the survey suggests that online hiring can shave that turnaround to just 3.3 days. There isn’t a small-business owner on the planet who’d balk at that, if the skills and experience of the candidate selected are as solid as anyone hired under the old way.

If bottom lines go down for the employer, and incomes increase for those freelancers getting hired, then the future of this new way of thinking about workers and job fulfillment stands to become more and more the norm in 2014 and beyond.

 

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The Big Data Business Bookshelf

The Big Data Business BookshelfBig data is everywhere these days, and many of us are trying to come up to speed on the technology. There are several books out now on this topic, and here are some tips for figuring out which ones are worth reading or best for newbies.

A good place to start is Frank Ohlhurst’s Big Data Analytics: Turning Big Data into Big Money. This is a business process and workflow treatment of the topic: you won’t find any code samples or URLs of open source repositories here. Ohlhurst, who worked with me at CMP and still writes numerous product reviews for the IT trade press, talks about ways to secure your data, structure it, and mine it for value and insights. It is a great book to give your boss.

Next is Big Data Analytics: Disruptive Technologies for Changing the Game by Arvind Sathi, a data architect for IBM. This is another great book for beginners, and identifies use cases, goes into more detail on the business processes and shows some of the main architectural elements of Big Data.

If you’re looking for something short and sweet and also free, try What Is Data Science? by Mike Loukides. You get some concrete examples of different kinds of data analysis tools and techniques and practical, real-world examples galore.

Then there is Enterprise Analytics: Optimize Performance, Process, and Decisions Through Big Data by Tom Davenport and several other authors. It covers a wider ground than some of these other books. It addresses topics including Big Data topics and a variety of other analytic techniques.

A more general overview of the major players behind Big Data is The Little Book of Big Data by Noreen Burlingame. It is a short read but a quick way to see who are the vendors making waves with this technology, including Hortonworks, Cloudera, Datameer and Karmasphere.

If you want to get more down and dirty into the technology, then the Hadoop: The Definitive Guide by Tom White is for you. White will take you through building your first Apache Hadoop cluster, the ins and outs of the Hadoop file system, how to set up MapReduce jobs, and using some of the other tools such as Pig, Zookeeper, and Hive. White works for Cloudera, one of the main commercial forces behind Hadoop.

Once you want to get more training, check out Cloudera University and Hortonworks University: both vendors have extensive programs on a multitude of topics relating to Hadoop and its offshoots, some paid and some for free. And Big Data University has dozens of courses all for free too.

 

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The Business of Your Well Being: 5 Steps to Better Living and Working

The Business of Your Well Being: 5 Steps to Better Living and WorkingOne in four small-business owners would pay $500 for one extra hour in their day.

That’s according to a recent survey conducted by eVoice, looking at how time management and office tasks are changing with the continued ascendancy of the cloud.

Turns out, time is the most valuable asset for small-business owners — 38% said so in the report — outpacing computers, mobile phones, and the company’s office/storefront as well.

With that in mind, what follow are five essential tips for time-management tactics — from learning to “pilot” the cloud to empowering employees your promoting better work habits for better living. Put the best use of time in the spot of MVP!

Time Management: Tips for Working and Living Right

Time management isn’t just about getting work done, the purpose is also to help small-business owners maintain a healthy work-life balance. Leveraging technology can help professionals reach that goal. Here are five ways to approach time-management strategies:

1. Empower your Employees: Learn to let go of the day-to-day tasks that are taking up your time. Instead, focus on the big picture. Not only does this help you to take charge of larger business issues, but your employees will learn and grow by taking on tasks normally assigned to the boss. That’s empowerment. Take a hard look at what you’re spending the most time doing every day. Whatever doesn’t fall into must be done by you category can be reassigned to an employee instead.

2. Learn to Pilot the Cloud: Cloud services can be big time savers for small-business owners. From business communications to document services, applications like Google Docs allow business owners to collaborate in real time with employees; EZ Balances is a simple app for business owners to use when tracking their spending; and Evernote allows business owners to keep track of notes and needs on the fly. And all your cloud-based materials are always accessible. And as any Mozy user knows, in addition to convenience, the cloud also provides security that your files will remain safe.

3. Streamline Communications: A virtual phone number enables small-business owners to work from anywhere without worrying about missing an important call or losing touch with the business. Just designate where you want to get the call — cell phone, office, home, hotel room, wherever. Most allow you to pre-screen incoming calls, cutting out the time consuming but less necessary chats till later. Even better, most virtual phone systems are equipped with voicemail-to-text features. Checking messages just got faster and easier as well!

4. Prioritize the DIY: As a small-business owner it’s tempting to do everything yourself. A whopping 90% of owners told eVoice that they fill the role of at least three different employees at once. As you began to categorize what tasks you could better delegate to your employees, in Tip 1, also work up a list of what you could outsource entirely, hiring a specialist rather than spending hundreds of hours doing it on your own.

5. The Business of Your Well Being. A recent Gallup Daily study found that employees who exercise and eat right are more enthusiastic and engaged in work. No kidding, right? But the same goes for owners at the top. Take the hint and make sure you give yourself a few hours each day to relax and give some attention to things other than business.

The bottom line is to streamline, refresh, and recalibrate. That extra hour in the day doesn’t have to come at such a steep price! Work with the tips above, and you might carve out even more time for making progress — and you’ll feel better about the way you go about it to boot.

 

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