Take a Multi-layered Approach to Ransomware Protection

Note: This is blog 4 of 4 in our ransomware series.

You already know your business should take steps to minimize the risk of a ransomware attack. But do you know how to implement multi-layered protection effectively? In January 2017, cybersecurity experts discovered a new type of ransomware called Spora. Now more than ever, it’s imperative business owners know their protection options.

Ransomware protection options

Decreasing your vulnerability is your most reliable option for ransomware protection. Here are a few ways to do that:

   •     Educate employees
   •     Implement employee monitoring          software
   •     Protect with endpoint technology
   •     Back up with the cloud

How these tools work

Spora, the latest ransomware rendition, is distributed as an email attachment disguised as an invoice. Once it is opened it must be unzipped. It then attacks the computer and sends a fake “unreadable file” error message to the user. So, what can be done? Consider the following four areas of action:

Employee accountability plays a major role, because visiting unauthorized sites and suspicious emails is detrimental. Implement a training program where employees will learn how to identify phishing emails and links.

Employee monitoring software connects all company devices on a single interface. Teramind, for instance, is software that lets employers monitor employee computer use and even implement rules and restrictions in real time. You can prevent employees from checking personal emails and visiting unsecured sites.

Endpoint cybersecurity is network protection for corporate-level businesses and servers. An endpoint program can block access between workstations across your network. New features, such as full-disc encryption and data leak prevention are added frequently. When many devices connect on one network, one infected device can put all the others at risk. Endpoint security decreases the chances of ransomware infecting other devices on the network.

Cloud backup is simple, affordable, and can be highly effective against ransomware; any files your company backs up on the cloud are copied over to a remote, independent server with a whole arsenal of cybersecurity protocols. 

If ransomware infects your device

If a computer is infected with ransomware, you have options. If you have a cloud backup, wipe and reinstall your OS on that computer. Afterward, you can recover all your files from your cloud service.

If you don’t have a cloud backup in place, a collection of companies exist to help you remove the ransomware for a fee. If you have an IT team or are tech savvy, you may attempt a recovery and removal yourself, though the process differs depending on your OS. Keep in mind, Windows machines are targeted more often than Mac or Linux operating systems.

Don’t ignore the very real, very risky dangers of ransomware. A multi-layered security approach trains employees, monitors them, scans files and emails using deep learning and endpoint network security and backs up data. Of course, the hope is you’ll never need to use your cloud backup, but it’s more crucial to have backups now than in any other time in history.

If you don’t have your backup set on a weekly schedule, now’s the time to change that.

Say no to ransomware disasters

Don’t fall victim to ransomware! Make sure your cybersecurity is truly multi-layered. Check out how Mozy by Dell can help your business confidently say no to ransomware disasters.

In addition, the following documents discuss how to protect your important data from ransomware:

   •     Ransomware: Frequently Asked Questions

   •     Preventing a Ransomware Disaster