Cloud Roundup and Links of Interest – May 18

How to Buy a Single Share of Facebook Stock

Facebook’s upcoming initial public offering is attracting more than your typical stock traders, and some of them just want a single share, according to an article in the Los Angeles Times.

The newspaper said websites that sell single shares of stock have been receiving a lot of inquiries about Facebook stock recently from users who are not usually attracted to IPOs.

“People who are buying one share typically never sell it,” OneShare Chief Executive Lance Lee told CNNMoney. “For the underlying company, it shows true brand loyalty.”

Buying a single share of stock typically costs nearly $40 more than the current trading price due to service fees. Like or dislike?

Cloud Adoption Approaching a Crucial Point

There’s a “tipping point” for cloud adoption, according to the CIO at Google, and it’s fast approaching.

Once that point arrives and companies enter the world of cloud computing, there’s no going back–it will become the standard for IT, according to Ben Fried, the search giant’s chief information officer.

An article in Midsize Insider takes a look at this issue and explores how midsize businesses and their IT fit into this new world of cloud computing. Is cloud adoption only meant for large-scale customers, or will it benefit “mom and pop” organizations? Have a look here.

Multitasking Too Much? Strap This on Your Head

Researchers are tapping into the brain’s signals to ease the downsides of multitasking and information overload, a growing problem in digital lifestyles, according to CNET.

Researchers unveiled the Brainput computer interface device at the recent Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI 2012), which explores new human-machine interface designs.

A prototype of the device uses functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) to sense changes in brain patterns that indicate a person is multitasking, and a brain sensor is strapped around the user’s forehead in order to more accurately record when a user is multitasking.

An interesting idea, but the sensor looks like a headband straight out of the ’70s American Basketball Association.