Links of Interest – July 26

Twitter Is Working on a Way to Retrieve Your Old Tweets

Old TweetsTwitter gives users access only to the last few thousand posts made to the site.

But Dick Costolo, Twitter’s chief executive, promises that this will eventually change, according to a post by The New York Times.

“We’re working on a tool to let users export all of their tweets,” Mr. Costolo said in a meeting with reporters and editors at The New York Times. “You’ll be able to download a file of them.”

Other social media services, most notably Facebook, already allow users to download a file with all their data. Twitter has been slower to roll out a similar service, although a number of third-party services and developers have cobbled together ways to let people sift through portions of Twitter’s vast collection of messages. One recently released site, called oldtweets, lets people root through some of the first messages ever sent through Twitter’s servers. (Curious about what people were tweeting about in 2006? Comically dated topics like “Returning movies to Blockbuster” and “Chatting with friends on MySpace.”)

10 Favorite Rumors About Apple`s Next Smartphone

The Apple iPhone 5 may or may not arrive in September. Or be super thin but extra big. Or feature a new dock, according to eWEEK.com.

There is no shortage of rumors, speculations or forecasts about a device—even the name iPhone 5 is a guess—that Apple has yet to officially breathe a word about. What is known is Apple finally has a real competitor in Samsung.

Past comparisons of iPhones to Android sales figures have been silly, as they weighed Apple against a handful of manufacturers. Samsung, however, has pulled ahead of the rest of the Android pack, and smartphone for smartphone, the South Korean giant has out-sold Apple during the first quarter of this year and likely also the second. When Samsung introduced the Galaxy S III in May, it showed its hand (and the public liked what it saw; Samsung has very publicly struggled to make supply meet demand).

Now following Samsung, the pressure is on. Apple has so succeeded at wowing the public during its staged events, the bar couldn’t be set higher.

Today’s Women of Space Remember Sally Ride

Sally Ride, the first U.S. female astronaut to fly in space, died July 23 at the age of 61 from pancreatic cancer. First launching on the Challenger space shuttle in 1983, Ride has become an enduring inspiration to people everywhere, particularly women working in science and engineering.

Ride’s place as the first American female astronaut was a long time coming, according to Wired. As far back as the Mercury program, NASA considered female astronaut candidates but the agency did not take the idea very seriously. Ride joined NASA in 1978, in the first astronaut class to include women, and trained for five years. Prior to her deployment on the Challenger mission, she endured sexist questions from reporters, shrugging them off by saying, “It’s too bad this is such a big deal. It is too bad our society isn’t further along.”

 

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