My name is Traci and I work for Mozy

Last month we piloted our series “My name is ____ and I work for Mozy.” This series is our way to introduce you to some of the extraordinary people that work at Mozy and who are the catalysts to why Mozy is a great company.

This month, we’d like to introduce you to Traci Magleby, Sales Manager with the “most-est.” Traci manages the sales team for the West Area for Mozy’s EMC Backup and Recovery Services team. In addition to being an extremely approachable and compassionate person, Traci also works with our EMC Partners to close deals to their customer base for Mozy’s military-grade security enabled cloud backup and recovery enterprise offerings.

My name is Traci and I work for Mozy

I define my workspace as …
Functional and inviting (a mix of job-essential items with mementos & pictures of my family). I want my space to be approachable, where anyone feels welcome.

A device I can’t live without …
iPhone

When I arrive at work, I typically start off by …
I usually arrive to work before my team which gives me the opportunity to jumpstart my day. I go through my email inbox, check my calendar for appointments that day and schedule time into my calendar for tackling must-do items. I also start completing my tasks in Salesforce. Once my team arrives, I take time to check in with each of them and find out their schedules for the day and any items needing my attention.

My work routine is …
My work routine varies day to day. Some days I am in a boardroom all day reviewing my team’s pipeline or on management calls. Other days, I am on the road, training partners or visiting customers. And then other days, I am at my desk going through spreadsheets and reports. I try to ensure that I communicate with members of my team daily and do everything I can to help make it easier for them to sell Mozy!

I do/do not listen to music at work and it helps me work better because …
Even though I love music, I seldom listen to music at work. I find that in my position, I am constantly being asked questions and communicating with my team. I like my team to know I am accessible when they need me – I don’t want earphones to get in the way! An added benefit is that it allows me to overhear conversations my team is having with partners and customers. It keeps me in the loop on their deals and allows me to provide any needed feedback.

The best advice I can give a recent college graduate looking to do what I do is …
People buy from people! Relationship building is crucial so start now in building your network and relationships.

Outside of work, I am passionate about …
My family, the outdoors and being creative.

My eating habits are …
I drink lots of water and bring snacks from home so I’m not tempted to indulge in the free soda pop and less healthy options in our break room. At home during dinnertime, I gather my family together almost daily and my favorite part is the conversations we have. I’ve been attempting to curb my sweet tooth this year, so I have limited to having sugar or dessert to once a week. My kids have joined me in this goal and I’m surprised with how well they are doing.

If I could be someone for a day – I would be …
I would choose my grandmother – she’s one of my biggest heroes. She has such a zest for life and I love how she handles life’s hard situations with confidence and grace. I benefit from her wisdom and would enjoy learning more of what makes her who she is.

The “secret sauce” that makes me who I am …
I try to give my time to things that matter the most in my life and I try to live a life full of gratitude. I hope I’m remembered this way.

Technically Speaking: Stories of the Week – April 1

Each week we scour the internet to find the best stories on technology, digital living and news of note. This week features a new phone charger that’s slim enough to fit into wallets, apps that help you hail cabs, and a 5-foot jellyfish robot. All that and more in this edition of Mozy’s Technically Speaking.

A Five-foot Jellyfish? Good thing it’s Only a Robot 

Robot Jellyfish - Surveillance Tool

As if people don’t find regular jellyfish pesky enough, Virginia Tech researchers have created a 5-foot robot version that can autonomously patrol oceans for surveillance and environmental monitoring, according to UPI.com. The robo-jellyfish has been named “Cyro” and was developed as part of a multi-university, nationwide $5 million project funded by U.S. Naval Undersea Warfare Center and the Office of Naval Research. According to the article the goal is to “create self-powering, autonomous machines that can travel the world’s ocean for surveillance, monitoring the environment, studying aquatic life, mapping ocean floors and monitoring ocean currents.”

Study Shows Facebook Users Check Facebook 14 Times a Day

How many times have you checked Facebook from your phone today? 5? 10? 15? A recent study by the analytics firm IDC shows that people check Facebook on their phones on an average of 14 times a day, according to NBC News. And Facebook wasn’t even the most checked application, according to the study; it was email. Also, the group surveyed said they spent about two-and-a-half hours a day on their phones. Almost half the group (44 percent) used their phones as an alarm clock, and 79 percent checked their phones within the first 15 minutes of waking up

Having Babies with Three Biological Parents May Soon Be Possible

As a child it was pretty tough to sneak things by two parents. Now things might get even more difficult. CBS New York reports that new technology that would bring babies into the world with three biological parents is close to being legalized in the United Kingdom. The main goal behind the technology is to be able to prevent mitochondrial disorders. The British public overall has supported the technology, according to published reports, but lawmakers have yet to make a decision on whether doctors can use it.

This New Phone Charger is So Slim it Will Fit in Your Wallet

Chargecard Wallet Cell Phone Charger

Finally there’s an answer for techies on the go who are tired of their cell phones running out of batteries. And it doesn’t require lugging around a a phone charger–well, at least not one of normal proportions. The ChargeCard, an invention that turned up on the site Kickstarter, is a USB phone charger that can fit in a wallet as easy as a credit card, says Seth Porges. The charger easily slips into a wallet, but some people are even finding that it fits between their phones and cases.

Use One of These Apps to Hail Yourself a Cab

Tired of missing out on cabs all the time in your nearest city? Luckily, there are several apps for smartphones and devices that can help you get your next taxi or ride share. This week, a post on the Mozy blog profiles Hailo in New York City and TechHive’s Caitlin McGarry breaks downUber, Side Car, and Lyft. Whether you’re looking for a yellow cab, a limo, or simply to get in the HOV lane, these apps make coordinating a ride easier than ever.

 

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Live from Your Living Room: Streaming Concerts

Live from your living roomThe lights come up, the crowd erupts, and jazz musician Walter Smith III steps onto the stage at Berklee College of Music in New York City. Smith III plays hundreds of gigs a year, so the sights and sound are familiar, but there is one thing about this show that’s different from all the others: it’s being recorded and streamed live over the Internet.

Live streaming of concerts is a growing trend in the music industry today, thanks to the increasing technology that’s available, according to Darren Lieberman, Senior Manager, Business Development & Music Partnerships at Livestream. Livestream, a platform that allows users to view and broadcast live video content, sells recording products to producers as well as broadcasting live shows on its website.

And despite what many may think, it’s not too difficult to stream a concert live for millions to see at home.

“At its simplest form — if you have a solid internet connection with enough bandwidth, a computer meeting our minimum specs running our free software, and a webcam, you can go live pretty instantly,” Lieberman said. “Just over the last 3-4 years we’ve seen a huge uptake in artists using live streaming. And as the technology gets even better and the costs to stream shows get lower, more and more artists will continue to jump on to the trend.”

Smith III jumped on the trend for his March 7 Berklee show, which was part of NPRMusic’s The Checkout – Live at Berklee, which brings critically acclaimed, New York-based Berklee alumni back to their alma mater for concerts to be streamed live online and on the radio.

Amy Schriefer, Sr. Product & Events Manager of NPR Music, said she also believes streaming live concerts is a trend that won’t be going away anytime soon. “As the industry changes and budgets shrink, we’re hearing from more artists that it just makes sense to do one show that reaches dozens of markets on the web and on the air,” she said. “The majority of our live webcasts are done in partnership with our member public radio stations, providing exposure on multiple platforms. The Checkout Live series, which features live jazz shows from venues, including Berklee, is aired on WBGO and webcast simultaneously on NPR Music.”

Smith III, who just released the new album found his show to be a positive experience. “It works well because people who wanted to go to the show but couldn’t can now see it. Whether they can’t make it due to distance, lack of tickets, or other reasons, this gives them a chance to see the performance.” It also doesn’t hurt that the musicians don’t have to do anything differently for the streamed shows — except maybe shorten a song or set here and there, he explained.

Lieberman echoed Smith III’s comments about these types of shows benefiting fans, but he also said they’re good for artists. “Not only is streaming a concert a way to attract new fans who may buy tickets to a future show, existing and new fans alike can follow an artist’s account on Livestream to be notified when they announce an event and go live with one.  This is a great way for artists to re-engage their existing fans and stay in touch online through social media and Livestream,” he said.

While Smith III said he believes video of concerts will continue to grow, and hopes the majority of it will be aired by organizations like LiveStream and NPR who allow the artists to have “control of the content.” If such legal streaming of concerts continues to grow it may cut down on the amount of concert clips posted online that are unauthorized, he said.

As for whether or not he plans to do more live streaming shows, Williams III said he might, but certainly doesn’t want to do too many. “I wouldn’t want every concert recorded,” he explained. “One every now and then is good.”

And this one was very good. Check it out at NPR Music.

 

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Where to, Bub?: Geo-Locating ‘Hailo’ Taxi Cab App Expands to New York City

Taxis in New YorkNew Yorkers are a people who appreciate convenience. Take, for example, its omnipresent taxi cab fleet. Be it a 4 AM flight out of John F. Kennedy Airport, or a 5 AM (ahem) last call at a club, there’s a good chance you’ll find a yellow Ford Crown Victoria–or ten.

But New York City is also a constant survival of the fittest. There’s always a little competition while trying to hail a cab, and sometimes you just can’t beat out the crafty veterans. The popular app Uber has tried to attract some fed-up taxi customers, sending a geo-tracked limousine service to your door or street corner. But for most folks, an on-demand limo is just far too much more expensive than the traditional metered cab.

In an attempt to keep up with the times while maintaining the comparatively reasonable costs, Hailo, another geo-locating taxi app, has recently struck a deal with New York City cab companies. Now, New Yorkers will be able to track taxi cabs in their direct vicinity, and with the touch of a button, “hail” them from the comforts of their home, cubicle, or even local bagel shop.

Hailo works just like Uber, but with yellow cabs instead of black Town Cars. A customer can see how many available cabs there are in their area, what the wait time would be, instantly hail the car of choice, and store their credit card information so that payment is seamless. Even though taxis in New York are unlike any other city in the world, “Hailo” is not a neophyte when it comes to big-city cabbing. The company currently works with the taxi fleets in Barcelona, Boston, Chicago, Dublin, London, Madrid, Tokyo, and Toronto.

But the app isn’t just for passengers. As Hailo points out, taxi drivers spend a lot of time trying to find passengers too, and now with the app, taxi drivers will be able to have a far better idea of where needy passengers are located, which will cut down on the fickle nature of the business (and gas expenses).

Visit the Hailo website here, or take a moment to watch their introductory YouTube video. As an additional bonus, if you sign-up for the app now, Hailo will deposit a $10 credit into your account.

Download Hailo for free in the iTunes Store or the Google Play Store.

 

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Technically Speaking: Stories of the Week – April 1

Each week we scour the internet to find the best stories on technology, digital living and news of note. This week features 47-inch touch-screen navigation systems coming to New York, tweeting churchgoers, and a smart watch battle.  All that and more in this edition of Mozy’s Technically Speaking.

Huge Navigation Touch Screens Coming to NYC Subway

New York City officials are trying to make it a lot easier for people to reach their destinations without getting lost. According to CNET, the New York City Metropolitan Transit Authority is collaborating with the Control Group, a technology and design agency, to provide 47-inch touch-screen kiosks with detailed maps of the city to be used in the subway system. The kiosks will feature interactive maps, alerts, and service announcements, according to the article, and up to 90 of them will be installed this year.

Would You Skype Your Wedding? 49 Percent of Brides Say They Would

Gone are the days of having a wedding with a single photographer. Technology is taking over in the wedding world, says Sherri L. Smith for Mashable. The article discusses how recent studies have shown that brides are very willing to use an abundance of technology when they say “I do.” While 49 percent said they wouldn’t mind having their ceremony being shown on Skype, 59 percent used Facebook to find or share wedding ideas, 68 percent took and shared photos of dress fittings and other preparation, and 59 percent update Facebook with their new name within one day of the wedding. As for Bachelor and Bachelorette parties, photos and video from those seem to be a little harder to come by.

Reverend Encourages Churchgoers to Tweet During Sermon

In the past most churches would frown at the use of cell phones during services. But Rev. Patrick Mead, senior pastor at Eastside Church of Christ in Colorado Springs is embracing the use of social media and technology. The reverend encourages his parishioners to Tweet or send Facebook messages out during his sermons, writes Stephanie Earls. And Eastside Church of Christ isn’t the only one using, or encouraging the use of social media among its congregation. More and more church leaders are turning to social media to spread the word of God, share information and to woo new members.

Will the Smart Watch be the New Tech Craze? Apple and Samsung Think So


It’s official: the smart watch is the next big thing: at least in the eyes of  tech giants. Apple and Samsung. Reports surfaced earlier this month that Apple was working on a new iWatch, but details were scarce. Since then, Samsung has also announced plans to develop its own version of a smartwatch, according to Doug Gross of CNN. Of course Samsung isn’t releasing any details either, so no one knows the features, cost, or even look of the new devices. The smart watch may be the latest  product in the “wearable technology” trend that has most recently included Google Glass.

 

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World Backup Day 2013

World Backup Day is March 31, 2013. Now is a great time to audit your current backup solution, make sure you know your backups are working and test restoring your files, This World Backup Day guide walks you through testing your own Mozy setup, and what to do if you’re not currently backing up.

Make sure to make it through to the end for 2 chances to win awesome prizes!

Mozy users: Check your backups and restores

Now is a great time to make sure that you know how to restore your files. Run through a test restore with these instructions.

Running into any problems or have some questions? Our support team is standing by – they’re here to help!

Don't Currently Back Up? Use Mozy.

What should you look for in a cloud backup provider? We’ve put together a helpful guide with some good questions to consider in your search.

  • Part 1 - Making Copies, Safekeeping, To the Cloud
  • Part 2 - Not Prepared to Lose, Create and Change
  • Part 3 - Incremental and Versioning, Backup Considerations

With over 3 million users, Mozy is a great choice for protecting your data. You can get started with a free 2GB account. Need more space? No problem – use the promo code “WorldBackupDay” for 15% off all new  1- and 2- year MozyHome and MozyPro accounts. Sign up for Mozy.

Backup is important for businesses as well. Over 90,000 businesses trust MozyPro with their important information. Find out how MozyPro can turn your backups into a competitive advantage for your company.

World Backup Day - Share and Win!

Know someone who doesn’t backup or needs some help getting started? Click here to tweet out the 15% discount code and help them get started with protecting their files.

Everyone who tweets will be entered to win one of three ZAGGSparq Portable Battery chargers (capable of charging a smart phone/device up to four times on a single charge) because you could always use some “backup” power, right? One entry per Twitter account, please.

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Has Mozy saved your bacon recently? Let us know how in the comments – you could win  a Sonos Playbar TV Soundbar and Wireless Speaker ($699 value). One entry will be chosen by our team.

Big Data: 5 Key Questions Business Owners Need to Ask

Big Data Questions for BusinessBusiness and tech professionals are talking about big data. A successful big-data project can illuminate new patterns and prompt fresh ideas about a business’s products, services, and customers. Big data is about putting the information you’ve got — and the data you’ll bring in next — to new use.

But when it comes to your business, and when it comes to how big data impacts and stands to augment small-business owners in particular, what’s the difference between big data and just lots of data?

The distinction is important and there are some key questions that owners can ask to help identify and tackle distinctions like that one. Let’s look at five of them, a shortlist of ways to think about big-data and, for small-business owners, the big picture.

Big-Data: Questions for SMBs

“Big data is many things, but what it is not is a technology initiative,” said Jim Gallo, National Director of Business Analytics for ICC, an Ohio-based IT services provider. “Your IT department will be deeply involved in setting things up and making sure you’ve got the number crunching horsepower to ‘do’ big data, but it is an initiative driven by the business not the IT department.”

What Gallo suggests that business owners think about boils down to this: don’t work with big data because you think you’re supposed to, engage with it because your business demands it.

Some ways to frame an approach to big data are as follows.

1. What Do You Want to Know? A big data initiative should begin with owners and partners addressing how the technology stands to help the business achieve its objectives. If new ways of seeing incoming information seem likely to improve efficiencies, increase margins, or open avenues that will help the team to sell smarter, then big data may be a good choice.

2. Do You Have a ‘Big Data’ Problem or a ‘Lots of Data’ Problem? Just because a data set is large, that doesn’t automatically make it “big data”. Remember that the idea behind a big-data enterprise is to find and utilize the kind of connections that all this info-crunching can produce.

3. Is It Worth It? Define the value you will get from big data. Corporate decision-makers faced with escalating costs, shrinking budgets and conflicting priorities are not going to fund a solution without a solid business justification (and that usually means: ROI). Part of the answer is back in the What Do You Want to Know? question. Develop the practical side of the response from there.

4. Where Will the Data Come From? Once you’ve determined that big-data is what you need, you have identify potential data sources. There’s what’s in-house already, and that may be a significant source, but the information you’re after may take some serious integration work to capture, or you may have to bring it in from third-party sources like social media or public data sets. Assess how you’ll secure it.

5. Will It Work? The stakes can be high when working with new technology, so talk to experts — and ideally talk to owners similar to yourself who’ve embarked on a big-data effort of their own. The business world is learning its way into this newly accessible way of looking at information, and the lessons learned by the community of owners like yourself, in this early stage of the game, may prove critical to your own assessment. The best way to understand whether big-data will work for your business is to understand what it does in action. Find out who other big-data exploring owners are. Reach out. In a similar model: answers that will help as you move forward.

Want to dig deeper into big data and how it applies to business. ICC has published this white paper on the subject. More ways to learn. Good luck!

 

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How to make money with malware

Computer VirusSecurity researchers from FortiGuard have identified the top four money-making schemes that malware authors employ to separate you from your cash. This isn’t surprising: spreading malware is just like any other software business: you need word of mouth (or a virus to help transmit things), willing customers who will download your code, and people who will pay money for your product.

The difference is that the malware guys aren’t selling you something that you really need, but something else entirely. It used to be that malware was just about gaining control over your computer, so that you could inadvertently be part of a botnet army that could attack someone else. And while there is plenty of that around, the latest schemes are all about making money directly from those who are infected.

It is as ingenious as it is dastardly. Guillaume Lovet, senior manager of FortiGuard Labs’ Threat Response Team, wrote in his blog post: “Now it’s not just about silently swiping passwords, it’s also about bullying infected users into paying.”

Here are the four top money-makers that Fortinet has observed:

1. The Flash update that tricks users into granting full installation rights. Once it is installed, the malware steals passwords to banking and other online payment sites. Given all the problems with Adobe exploits over the years, this may be disappointing, but isn’t all that surprising.

2. The fake anti-virus popup warning. This looks benign but is actually quite nasty. The popup looks like some legit AV software, but woe on anyone who actually purchases and then installs this stuff: you have just bought and installed malware.

3. Ransomware. This is a piece of software that blocks your PC, and the only way you can unblock it is if you pony up some cash. The blockage takes the form of stopping the boot process or encrypting part of your hard drive. It installs automatically on a user’s PC and then demands its ransom.

4. Nasty Trojan Horses. The latest in Trojan Horse attacks is to trick someone into installing a piece of code on their smartphone, and then working the two-factor authentication in such a way that your banking information is recorded both on your phone and in the PC session which has already been infected. These trojans then siphon off your funds to a third party account.

It’s a scary digital world out there. Let’s just hope we can stay a couple of steps ahead of the bad guys.

 

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Small-Business and Q1: An Uncertainty ‘Report Card’

Small Business Report CardSmall-business owners say the early part of 2013 was all about the financial crisis in Congress, with 37% indicating in a recent survey that they delayed hiring due to uncertainties stemming from what would come of the impasse.

With sequestration now the new reality, it remains to be seen what will develop in terms of small-business human resources as the result. Let’s look at some of the deeper issues and effects of recent changes in the economic scenario. We turn to the numbers, and the people generating them, to examine where SMBs stand at the end of Quarter 1, as they start the rest of 2013.

Q4–Q1: The Horizon for SMBs

Tough times have apparently taken a toll on small-business owners.

Among those polled by Manta, a company that connects SMBs with new clientele and resources, 82% did not make any new hires from October–December of 2012. More than half (65%) didn’t plan to add staff in Q1 of 2013. Meanwhile, nearly 40% of those businesses said that these decisions correlated directly with the recent fiscal turmoil in Washington.

More stats and figures:

  • 14% said they would not increase salaries or issue bonuses until the effects of the fiscal wrangling became clear.
  • 13% indicated that they had already eliminated discretionary spending.

Respondents also said they were leaving behind some healthy habits in favor of working harder at their shops.

  • 29% of small-business owners said they ate healthier and worked out more, in recent months, but that’s down compared to nearly 51% who said they were doing so during 2011.
  • Nearly half of those polled said they worked more than 50 hours/week, up more than 20% from 2011.
  • 37% of the owners said they averaged less than 6 hours of sleep every night.

But all hope hasn’t been lost. Among the small businesses polled by Manta, 78% of the owners said they’re still hopeful about growth in 2013.

“I’m always hopeful about the year ahead, but I also know it’s on me to make it happen,” said Stuart Rubenstein, co-owner of Florida-based Kaleidoscope Limited, who participated in the survey. And that attitude is no surprise to Pamela Springer, Manta’s chief executive officer. The will to survive, and to thrive, she said, is a hallmark of the SMB demographic.

“The New Year has a new level of uncertainty for all businesses,” said Springer, but, she added: “It is inherent for small-business owners to have a can-do attitude, even in the toughest of times.”

 

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Technically Speaking: Stories of the Week – March 25

Each week we scour the internet to find the best stories on technology, digital living and news of note. This week features tips for finding free Wi-Fi, the hashtag taking over Facebook, license plate readers with an eye on Manhattan, and the slimmest television you’ve ever seen. All that and more in this edition of Mozy’s Technically Speaking.

Just When You Thought Televisions Couldn’t Get Any Thinner…

Philips Designline Promo Image

Philips’ new DesignLine television may look more like a slab of glass than an actual TV, but the company has managed to create the product without any stands, necks, bezels, or other “eyesores”. The television, designed by TP Vision, is made to just lean against the wall. (A wall-mount option is also available.) The product is said to be ready for launch in the United Kingdom in June, but no word yet on a U.S. release. Caleb Denison of Digital Trends says the DesignLine set will have 1080p resolution; LED edge lightning; active shutter 3D technology with 2-player full-screen gaming’ a remote control with full keyboard and “pointer”; 4 HDMI, 3 USB, Wi-Fi, Ethernet inputs; Smart TV apps; USB recording; and Smart sharing features.

Find Free Wi-Fi Wherever You Go

You may have a secret or two up your sleeve when it comes to getting free Wi-Fi. After all, most people want to be able to email and access important documents in the cloud with smartphones, tablets or laptops no matter where they are or what they are doing. USA Today has some help for those that are regularly working on the go. They put together a list of 5 ways to find surefire, ways to locate free Wi-Fi no matter where you are going. The methods include “thinking outside the Wi-Fi box,” “join hotel loyalty programs and use coupons,” “tap into Wi-Fi databases,” “free Wi-Fi access from your cable company,” and “tether your phone.”

License Plate Readers to Help NYPD Track All Cars Entering Manhattan

High Tech NYPD

The sky in New York might soon be blue every day, even when it’s overcast outside. It might not be long before drivers won’t be able to enter or leave New York City without being recorded. As Matt Sledge of Huffington Post reports, city officials plan to install license plate reader cameras in all lanes of roads leading into, and out of, Manhattan. The license plate readers will scan all license plate numbers and record information about the car and time of travel to a database. While privacy advocates are steaming over what they see as a violation of rights, those in favor of the technology are saying it could help prevent terrorist attacks.

Will the Hashtag be One of Facebook’s Newest Features?

Known for it’s use on the popular social media site Twitter, the Hashtag may be making its way across platform lines. According to The Wall Street Journal, Facebook is working on incorporating the hashtag into its users’ experience. Like Twitter, it would be designed to help group together conversations. Facebook is also doing research on other ways the hashtag might be used. It is still not clear whether the move will be definite, and details are still being ironed out, but hashtags on Facebook is a real possibility, according to the article. Look for the news to spark even more competition between to two social media giants.

Fans of Google Reader Fight to Save the Program from Imminent Shutdown

In case you haven’t already heard, Google has decided to pull the plug on its Google Reader feature. Upset about the impending shutdown, users have come together to create a petition and gather more than 100,000 signatures in hopes of saving the program, according to The Next Web, which has the entire petition available for reading. According to the article, those fighting the good fight shouldn’t hold out much hope though, as Google appears to be firm on it’s stance to cut its Reader feature, perhaps by the end of the month.

 

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