Why data retention is vital for businesses in the financial services sector

The financial services industry is highly regulated, and businesses within this sector need to meet strict compliance requirements—managing unstructured content like contracts, bank statements, insurance policy documents, and investment certificates. These days, most transactions are processed electronically. If data wasn’t retained, and there weren’t records of transactions and approvals, there would be chaos in the courts, the exchanges, and anywhere there are financial transactions.

Data retention allows for workflow automation, which not only creates business process efficiency, it provides an audit trail that processes were followed to meet compliance requirements. High standards of encryption and robust firewall technology safeguard your reputation, and your clients’ privacy.

Here are four proof points that financial service providers need to make data retention a top priority:

Regulatory compliance

For insurance brokerages, investment firms, accounting firms and bank branches, the practice of managing electronic documents is subject to a number of compliance requirements. Files with credit card information associated with them need to managed with policies, technology and practices as required by the Payment Card Industry council’s PCI-DSS standards.

Other standards include those that scrutinize the security controls implemented by the service provider that stores your information, such as ISO/IEC 27001 and SSAE 16. Contracting data management services from a service provider with these certifications mitigates risk of data loss, and goes a long way to satisfying audit requirements. Other relevant financial services compliance requirements you should use as data storage services evaluation criteria include:

   •     Sarbanes Oxley (SOX)
   •     Gramm-Leach-Blilley Act (GLBA)
   •     US-EU Safe Harbor Framework
   •     EU data protection acts

The more your firm can mitigate responsibility for data retention, compliance and security to a proven, certified service provider for your data at rest and data in motion, the greater your peace of mind.

Litigation readiness

When a financial services provider such as a credit union or one of their clients is involved in a court case, the ability to quickly gather all of the relevant evidentiary files is important. Searching multiple PCs, shared drives or filing cabinets at the last minute is risky, and can end up costing you or your customer dearly. Functions like PC backup, remote/branch office backup, and file sync ensure that files are stored in a unified repository, and can be retrieved when needed.

The ability to manage access rights on documents, and to prevent them from being edited can be crucial when it comes time to “lock down” a set of documents during court proceedings.

Discoverability

Businesses and consumers complete lots of contracts for their day-to-day banking, investment, and insurance needs. Storing these documents for the lifecycle of the relationship is critical. That includes documents that were once paper as well as those that were created electronically. Storing all of these files together, profiling them with effective metadata and filing them in a structured foldering system, and using a robust search capability makes them easy to find when needed.

The monthly cost of a cloud-based data storage service can easily pay for itself by ensuring files don’t go missing and can be retrieved with ease, and are only available to those who have a strong business reason for access.

Business continuity, backup and recovery

Document storage apps mitigate risk of losing files from fire, flood, or hardware failure. Who hasn’t spilled coffee on their laptop and then had their heart leap in their chest, wondering about the recoverability of their files? For investment advisors or accountants, the ability to quickly change devices and immediately have access to their files from their smartphone, laptop or tablet increases their productivity and morale. In this age of cloud file storage, customers and investors expect your firm to have/provide access to their policies, portfolios, and other data—without interruption.

Local data backups that use traditional tape drives or portables storage can be time-consuming and prone to failure. Cloud backups with virtual drives process much faster, are simpler to do, and they shift the responsibility of maintaining your files to skilled technicians. Automated backups of PCs, servers, and remote office systems reduces your IT team’s workload.

Looking for a secure, reliable, and proven data retention solution for your business in the financial services sector? Check out MozyEnterprise or MozyPro service plans. Or check out our customer testimonials from Dreambuilder Investments and Advance Insurance if you need more proof.

Why it’s important for employees to get away from their desk at lunchtime


Office staff. Cubicle dwellers. Desk jockeys. Dilberts. Corporate.

They have many names, but just like any other profession, they have to find time in their busy day to eat. They may be on the 27th floor of an office building or in their home office. Where ever they might be, it is in their best interest—and yours—to make sure they have time to break away from their computer, from their phone, and from their desk to eat, disconnect and rest.

There’s always a conference call, report deadline or “lunch and learn,” which seem to keep your employees at their desk over the lunch hour. Yet the benefits of allowing them to submit the report a little later or plan their calendar more effectively can produce significant gains in their:

   •     Productivity
   •     Morale
   •     Relationships with colleagues
   •     Health and fitness conditioning
   •     Alertness

Consider jobs like operations, inside sales, tech support, marketing, graphic design, and application development. These employees are sitting for hours at a time, and staring at a computer screen for much of it. Usually, the longer people work at their desk, the easier it to forget to decompress, get some fresh air and better nutrition than a cold Pop Tart, the monthly birthday cake, or the last Snickers bar from the office vending machine.

There are many benefits to encouraging your employees to take a lunchtime break, and your business will benefit from them in the long term. Here are three of our favorites.

1. Productivity and focus

Remember when you were a kid at school, and the lunch bell rang, and everyone was happy to grab their lunchbox, eat what Mom sent them, or dine on the gourmet fare at the school cafeteria? Whether that was your experience or not, you likely had some time to get some fresh air, run around the yard, and refresh your body and brain for the rest of the day.

At the office, you should encourage your employees to get some fresh air too. If your employees might need access to customer data if an important call comes in, a cloud-based, mobile file management application can provide access to files like quotes, invoices, or even Outlook PST files. Out of the office doesn’t have to mean out of the loop.

Empowering your employees to take a stroll around the block, go to a local gym and blow off steam, or have a hot, nutritious lunch will pay off with focus, energy, and enthusiasm. If something important breaks over the lunch hour, your teams will feel connected enough to address what they need to, but free enough to recharge their batteries.

2. Social engagement and team building

Just like your family at the dinner table, some of the best conversations happen when employees can meet face-to-face over a meal and a beverage. Hydration and nourishment can eliminate that “wall” of fatigue that often hits around 3 PM, where concentration lags, and employees often stray to social media sites like Facebook and Twitter. Idle screen time isn’t helping your team to produce better results, it’s just a distraction that can drag on past the lunch hour.

Having walking meetings, stand-up scrums, or setting up a ping-pong table in an unobtrusive space in the office can encourage people to share ideas, build relationships with new colleagues, and catch up on what’s happening across the business. WiFi accessibility in the office is ideal. If employees can move about your office environment with access to their files and apps, they won’t feel the guilt of straying from their desk. Some companies are eliminating designated desks altogether and allowing their employees to work where they can be most productive.

3. Health and Nutrition

Do you ever stream a TV series at home, while eating a bag of chips, a pizza, or nachos? That might be fun on occasion, but if you think about it, doesn’t that pizza, those chips or nachos taste better when you’re eating them without the distraction of TV or a movie? When we eat at our desks, the lunch experience is really diluted by the spreadsheets, documents, and other files on our desks. When we eat mindfully alone, or with other people, we are more aware of what we are eating, when we are full, and what our body really needs.

The idea that “sitting is the new smoking” is not new. Investing in ergonomic desks, which can be set for sitting or standing, can prevent conditions and disease like obesity, cancer, and lower back pain. Providing tools like mobile apps and devices that allow your employees to get outside (and stay connected), have a social lunch, or volunteer for a cause contributes to better mental and physical health.

Though it seems counter-productive to prevent your employees from working through lunch, there’s lots of proof that when employees break away from their desk for 30 minutes to an hour, they will produce better results, be more engaged, and they may even invite you along to their yoga or spin classes at lunchtime.

Does the idea of a mobile-enabled, cloud based file management app sound like a good way to liberate your employees from being chained to their desk over lunch? Try a 30-day trial of MozyPro today.

Mozy backup is for solopreneurs

Are you a solopreneur?

If you are a one-person business—or “solopreneur”—then Mozy online backup is for you. (And for anyone else who wants to protect their files with the least amount of hassle.)

A recent article in Inc. emphasizes that solopreneurs enjoy the flexibility of working for themselves. For example, they can ply their trade just about anywhere and at any time. It’s their show. However, because they work for themselves, they are usually under pressure to be productive all the time. In a one-person business the show does not go on unless the solopreneur is making it happen.

When you work for yourself, you need to make the most of your time and take advantage of tools to help you do that. Here’s what author Minda Zetlin says about Mozy online backup:

“What would happen if the ceiling caved in on your desktop computer? Would you lose valuable data, setting your business back? If you want to stop being vulnerable, you need an off-site backup system, and an automatic cloud-based one is by far the easiest,” Zetlin says.

“I’ve used Mozy for years, and though I’ve never had a computer disaster, I’ve used it many times to grab files I needed when I was away from home—another handy feature,” she says.

Mozy lets solopreneurs schedule backups to run daily, weekly, or monthly—it’s your choice. In fact, Mozy is the perfect data protection tool for solopreneurs because it offers automatic backup protection with the option to schedule backups continuously throughout the day. When you’re a solopreneur, you have plenty of things to worry about; protecting your business-critical files shouldn’t be one of them.

Read the Inc. article 7 Business Tools that Are Perfect for Solopreneurs for more tips on how to make the most of your time and make running your business easier.

Whether you’re a solopreneur or an enterprise with 100,000 employees, your files are important. And because they’re important to you, they’re important to Mozy by Dell. Be sure to check out how Mozy lets you access your files not just from your computer, but your smartphone or tablet as well.

It’s the downtime in ransomware that might do the most damage


Ransomware continues to make headlines. Unfortunately, notwithstanding all the news, there are businesses that are still not adequately protecting their data and, as a result, fall victim to ransomware. But even if a business does regain access to its data after paying that Bitcoin ransom, it has no doubt suffered downtime. Perhaps not surprisingly, downtime from ransomware can be more damaging to small businesses than the ransom itself, as reported by in a recent online article.

50 percent of organizations have been hit by ransomware

One of the misleading aspects of ransomware is the small amount of ransom that’s demanded by cybercriminals. The average ransom demand is less than $700. Yes, we read about how cybercriminals collected $1 billion last year via ransomware exploits, but that’s the result of many thousands of successful ransomware outbreaks. When you consider that 50 percent of organizations have been hit by ransomware, it’s easy to understand how thousands and thousands of collected ransoms add up for cybercriminals.

Much of that is the result of spam, in particular through malicious attachments in email that are opened by the unwary. In these cases, a user is directed to open an email attachment or visit a website where the ransomware is presented, masquerading as a legitimate attachment or download. From there the virus spreads, ultimately gaining control of systems—and valuable files.

Ransomware doesn’t have to be perfect

Who knows whether ransomware will ever be perfected? Probably not. But it doesn’t have to be. The goal of the cybercrimninal is a blanket approach: target as many would-be victims as possible and hope that even a small percentage open that malicious attachment.

As we’ve already learned, thousands of small successes can quickly add up to $1 billion.

The ransom isn’t necessarily the most damaging

“Ransomware wasn’t necessarily the most expensive aspect of a ransomware attack: downtime, revenue loss, and fallout were more expensive and far more damaging, especially when you’re talking about small businesses,” says Adam Kujawa, head of malware intelligence at Malwarebytes, as reported by Kelly Jackson Higgins in Dark Reading.

One report found that downtime costs small businesses $55,000 in income every year; that doesn’t even account for the cost of paying employees who can’t work without access to systems or paying them overtime to catch up when systems come back online.

Here’s what you can do

Today, ransomware is one of the primary concerns for organizations—small, medium, or large.

So, what can you do? There are number of things you can do, like don’t open suspicious-looking emails or suspicious-looking attachments. And be sure your data is properly protected. Do not take data protection for granted!

Check out how Mozy by Dell can help you avoid a ransomware disaster.

I Remember the Time I Lost My Data (Part 2)

My data loss story isn’t simple. The data loss was not limited to one file, or even one device. Although this happened almost 10 years ago, the repercussions of this are still being felt in the organization I used to work for.

As I mentioned, this happened almost a decade ago. I had to travel for work to Mumbai, India, and as is required of any Pakistani travelling to India, I had to register with the local police station when I arrived in the city, and before I left.

Because the local office I was working with didn’t have anyone who could drive me to the police station—and this was before Uber existed—I had to rely on the local transport system alone. Aware that I could be mugged while travelling, I left my belongings with some local colleagues who were instead going straight to the hotel. They had my laptop, phone, and all my notes from the day’s meetings.

After I was done with the police station, I went back to the hotel, only to be told that my colleagues had forgotten my backpack on the local transport they used. Although they had spent the last few hours looking for the bag, it was nowhere to be found.

I left my bag behind thinking it was more secure with them than with me and lost a year’s worth of organizational data that wasn’t backed up anywhere.

LOL. Talk about irony.

The phone had valuable contact information, and my laptop had not only notes from the meetings that I had traveled to India for, but all of my data for the last year as well.

Coming back home and realizing that I would need to comb through emails for the last 10 months to recover just a part of the data I had lost was horrifying. I had managed to put my team back months as far as delivering on our goals was concerned!

Over time, I was able to recover about 80% of the data. I had to email a lot of colleagues to ask for newer versions of documents, scour through my emails to find others, and sit and re-create some of the lost data late at night.

I no longer work at the same organization, but there are still times when someone needs a file that was on my laptop and I have to say that I was not able to recover it despite my best efforts.

All my data is backed up now. All my work files, personal files, images, videos are backed up in the cloud, and on an external drive. A reminder in my calendar ensures I never forget to back up to the external storage drive. But even better, cloud backup services like Mozy are set up to back up important files automatically.

Check out the ways Mozy by Dell backs up your important data, from desktops and laptops to small servers. And Mozy Sync keeps your most active files up to date across your computers, smartphones, and tablets. You’ll have your files anywhere you go.

Mozy Saves the Day

During the past couple months, I immersed myself into answering one simple question: What is Mozy? As a recently hired Dell EMC intern, I wanted to know everything I could about the many ways Mozy protects data; in particular how Mozy protects against a cybercrime that has become very prevalent in recent years—ransomware.

What is Mozy?

Mozy is a cloud-based service that backs up your important data from endpoint sources, like your laptop or tablet. For SMBs and large enterprises, Mozy helps soften the blow of the unexpected by maintaining the reliability of business-critical data. Having productivity stop because an employee’s laptop was stolen or your data was encrypted by ransomware is not good news to hear!

After learning about Mozy’s easy-to-use and worry-free data protection features, I now know Mozy is a good choice for anyone who wants peace of mind about the security of their data. Whether it is a business or just a personal computer at home, backing up important information is crucial. As a writer myself, I wouldn’t want to see my budding novels held hostage at the grasp of a cybercriminal!

For example, my current way of backing up my data is on a twelve-year-old USB drive that hasn’t been updated since 2014. I hold onto it with my life, but that isn’t the safest place for the files I treasure. And as much as I hate to admit this in public, each file within the USB is almost four years old. If my computer crashes for any reason, all of that hard work is lost and all that is left will be the four-year-old documents collecting dust on my USB. Wouldn’t that be a damper on a good day!

With Mozy, you don’t have to plug it in, keep it in a safe place, or even remember to update it. It is purely cloud-based storage that protects your files. I like to think of Mozy as the fastest route to a safe computer. Not only is there an increase in time management with less manual labor in securing files, you also have the luxury of always knowing your information is safe and accounted for.

What is ransomware?

Learning about ransomware is honestly terrifying. The realization that there are ways to randomly attack people online is shocking. What’s even more of a surprise is how ransomware affects a computer. It is as simple as opening a malicious link or an infected attachment in an email. Before you can say “I want my data back!” your whole system will be locked at the whim of the cybercriminal. The kicker is spending money to possibly regain the data being held for ransom. Holding your data in exchange for ransom would make anyone fear for the safety of their information.

How Mozy saves the day

With backup and recovery along with threat detection and prevention, Mozy makes absolutely sure that your information is safe and in your control. Ransomware tries to give the illusion that a faceless person has the power over your data’s future. With your data backed up to the Mozy cloud, the effect is useless.

Removing the fear of cyberthreats with the help of Mozy assures you that the small bumps in the road will always be taken care of. This software will allow you and your colleagues to rest at ease.

Now that I am aware of the danger from ransomware, I back up my important files with Mozy. I don’t want to jeopardize my future bestseller from getting published!

Learn more about how Mozy is a second line of defense against ransomware.

Mozy Supports Key Management Interoperability Protocol

The MozyEnterprise service now offers another encryption key option, furthering Mozy’s commitment to data security. Mozy supports the Key Management Interoperability Protocol, at no additional cost to our customers. At this point, you’re probably asking yourself a few questions.

What is KMIP?

Key Management Interoperability Protocol—or KMIP for short—is a communication protocol that defines secure formats for the manipulation of encryption keys on key management servers (KMS). There is a general trend in enterprise IT toward the centralized management of encryption keys across multiple applications using KMS.

What does this mean to me as a customer?

Today, Mozy offers three encryption key options:

   •     Mozy default encryption key: Mozy assigns an encryption key to your users. This key is stored and managed by Mozy          for the most seamless experience.
   •     Personal encryption key: The user enters a passphrase that is used to create the encryption key. Each user manually          creates a unique personal encryption key.
   •     Corporate encryption key: The administrator enters a passphrase that is used to create the encryption key. Your Mozy          admin can create a key for all users in the company or a unique one for each user group.

With the introduction of support for KMIP, Mozy now offers a fourth data encryption method. Enterprises prefer that applications using encryption keys be KMIP-compliant so they can be managed via a KMS. KMS provides a secure, single point of encryption key management across multiple IT applications.

KMIP ensures the privacy of your data. An advantage of KMS for Mozy customers is that it enables backup admins to easily create and manage per-user local encryption keys. This provides finer encryption granularity (that is, increased at-rest data security) than a corporate encryption key while retaining its on-premises advantages.

Which Mozy products include KMIP?

KMIP is now in directed availability for the MozyEnterprise service at no additional cost. KMIP is currently only supported on the Windows platform. Mac integration is coming soon. On the KMS front, KMIP is currently supported on SafeNet’s KeySecure KMS. If interested in KMIP, please reach out to us via email.

NotPetya: Yet Another Ransomware Outbreak

The WannaCry ransomware virus has become a distant memory for many. For some WannaCry and its variants came and went without doing damage. Others weren’t so lucky. What we are learning (once again) is how critical it is to be prepared against a ransomware outbreak. The fact that the ransomware threat is ongoing and not leaving the scene of the cybercrime anytime soon is underscored by the latest malware to hit the unprotected computer environment and make headlines: NotPetya.

The NotPetya ransomware breakout appears to have started in Eastern Europe and is spreading west. From what we know at this time, a Ukrainian accounting software application is the suspected source; NotPetya was apparently hidden in a software update. As you might expect, NotPetya was named after the Petya ransomware because it masquerades as that ransomware.

What about that ransom?

The NotPetya ransom payment mechanism has been disabled; that is, the email ID associated with cybercriminal’s Bitcoin account was blocked by the email ID’s provider, according to a source. In other words, there is no way to pay even if you want to. At this point of the outbreak, the purpose of this malicious virus is to attack systems quickly and cause as much damage as possible.

NotPetya is considered more dangerous than the WannaCry virus, which was so devastating because it paralyzed infected computers and then caused application failures for systems that had a dependency on Windows operating systems. Hundreds of victims paid various amounts of ransom in Bitcoin in exchange for a decryption key. If there was anything good about WannaCry, it was that it warned IT admins and others to keep their Windows operating systems up to date with the latest patches.

So, what’s the point?

It’s important to remember that cybercriminals who seek to infect systems with ransomware or spread any other form of malware are criminals; cybercriminals to be sure, but criminals just the same who might have no other purpose than to simply cause damage. In the case of NotPetya, this ransomware spreads more effectively than WannaCry and not only encrypts data but also extracts credentials to other machines and systems.

Similar to the WannaCry virus, the purpose of NotPetya is to infect Windows 10 computers. Fortunately, the Windows 10 Credential Guard spots NotPetya’s password extraction from memory. Ransomware running in the Windows 10 operating system with administrative privileges cannot extract credentials. Read more about Windows 10 Credential Guard.

Mozy can help you defend against ransomware

Mozy by Dell can help you protect your environment from the NotPetya ransomware. Here’s how:

   •     Immutable copy: Mozy uses a proprietary encryption and encoding mechanisms to store backups which prevents any          execution of code within files that have been backed up. Mozy backups are entirely separate from your computer.
   •     Point-in-time backup and restore: Mozy uses file versioning, allowing the end user or administrator to restore the entire          backed up data set or individual files and folders from any point in time; up to seven years for MozyPro and          MozyEnterprise, and 90 days for MozyHome. This allows you to easily go back to a healthy version of your files.
   •     Automatic backups: Mozy provides automatic backup as frequent as every two hours, providing highly granular point in          time backup to recover from.
   •     Self-service restore: Mozy provides the ability to the end user to perform their own restore from the Mozy agent or the          Web Access interface.

Avoid a ransomware disaster

To learn how you can use Mozy as a second line of defense for your data and to prevent a ransomware disaster, visit Mozy by Dell.

Other Mozy blogs about ransomware

For more information about ransomware and what you can do to increase your defenses:

   •     Educate your users and yourself
   •     Take a multi-layered approach to protection
   •     WannaCry? You will if you don’t back up

I Remember the Time I Lost My Data (Part 1)

I document everything. From photographing my daily commute to scanning and saving every receipt I acquire, it’s important to me that everything I’ve done or seen is somehow on file. I’m a private eye, and I believe in impeccable organization, and keeping records of everything I see and do. As I learned in detective school, anything can lead to a clue.

Every day, I create a new file on my enormous hard drive titled with the date. There are over 4,000 files. Over the last 11 years, I have diligently documented everything. I can pull up information on any hour of any day and remember exactly what I was doing then. I have traced that data back to robberies and kidnappings and used it to solve mysteries. For example, by snapping photos of the muddy animal tracks on the sidewalk, I helped the bakery discover that it was a fox who was breaking in and stealing cookies. That’s just one example of out of a thousand where my record keeping came in extremely handy.

It was under unfortunate circumstances when I realized how important it is to back up my data. It started out like any other Thursday morning. I was reviewing my data collection from yesterday, including a few photos of the groceries I purchased, a pigeon hopping on a giant scarecrow, an abstract figurine my nephew constructed out of Silly Putty, a recorded conversation with my accountant, and the list of songs I had listened to that day. Yes, minutia to most folks, but details that I consider important.

It was a beautiful, sunny morning. I opened the windows to let the warm breeze in. The birds were chirping, and a family of blue jays seemed to be in perfect harmony. I poured my cereal and was brewing some coffee when I heard a crash. I looked over to my laptop and saw that my new puppy had gotten tangled in the power cord and had innocently pulled the computer to the floor. The external damage to my laptop was obvious. What wasn’t so obvious was the internal damage.

After successfully getting my laptop to turn on again, I immediately heard clicking noises. I would eventually figure out that my hard drive was the culprit. It became obvious that my hard drive was experiencing mechanical failure. Eventually, it would also become obvious that all of the data I had accumulated over the past few years was gone. Unfortunately, nothing was backed up. It was a lesson learned the hard way. Now I’m an advocate for people to back up all of their files to the cloud. It’s what I call a data-saving solution. You don’t have to be a detective to figure that out!

Back up and protect your important files with Mozy by Dell. Case closed!

Check out how another Mozy customer combined his detective work with the reliability of Mozy cloud backup to track down the thieves who stole his laptop. Watch video.

Rumor has it that the ransom is going up

Ransomware is a vicious form of malware that locks users out of their devices or blocks access to files, until a ransom is paid. There are numerous variants, with some ransomware designed to attack Windows devices, and others geared towards Macs or mobile devices. The WannaCry outbreak is a recent example of this form of malware that’s infecting Windows computers.

Evolution of ransomware

While ransomware has been around since the late 1980s, it went “pro” in September 2013 when CryptoLocker was released. It was the first cryptographic malware, and spread quickly via downloads from a compromised website and/or emails made to look like customer complaints. It was estimated that more than $27 million was paid in ransom.

That may seem like a hefty amount to pay out, but there’s only been an exponential increase in ransom payments, with CNN reporting that cybercriminals collected more than $209 million in the first quarter of 2016!

Over the course of time, encrypted browser software such as TOR, anonymous currencies like bitcoin, and increasingly intelligent cybercriminals have evolved ransomware to where it is the #1 security concern of organizations.

Protecting your business

Cybercriminals do not particularly care who their victims are, as long as they can pay a ransom. With a scatter gun approach to propagating ransomware, cybercriminals just want to cast the net as wide as possible so as to maximize the returns.

Here is how you can protect your business:

Educate your users

Most people can’t tell a phishing email from a safe email. Teach your employees to recognize a phishing email. Train them to only open emails from people they know and that pertain to topics they would be expected to talk to them about, and avoid navigating to URLs sent in emails.

“Humans need to be trained; they are the weakest link,” says Paul Kubler, a cybersecurity and digital forensics examiner at LIFARS LLC. “Companies should employ at minimum a bi-annual training geared towards each user group so that everyone is aware of the latest attacks.”

Use a layered defense and update your software regularly

Ransomware attacks involve many different elements. They can start off as a spam email with a link to a malicious website that exploits vulnerabilities in your system to download the virus. A layered approach to cybersecurity, such as email security as well as network protection, can defend you at each of these points. Each layer creates an extra obstacle for the malware, making it more difficult for the attack to be successful.

Keep your operating system, third-party applications, and antivirus programs updated at all times. These are layers of defense for your data, and while they are not bulletproof, they can go a long way in protecting you.

Back up your data often

Business devices often contain sensitive information, as well as operation-critical information such as customer data and business plans. Losing this data to a ransomware attack could severely cripple your business processes. Ensure regular backups are made of all important data, and that these backups are also routinely tested to make sure they work.

According to Steven J.J. Weisman, author of Scamicide, “The best defense against ransomware is to back up all of your data each day. In fact, my rule is to have three backup copies using two different formats with one off site.”

Ransomware isn’t going anywhere, and it is up to each business to protect itself from being the next victim of this type of cybercrime. Mozy by Dell can help. You can avoid a ransomware disaster!

Read about how these two businesses protect their data from ransomware:
   •     Technology consultant battles ransomware with Mozy backup
   •     IT provider chooses Mozy. ‘Nuff said!