Mozy Named “2010 Utah Best Company To Work For”

In 2009 Mozy was voted one of the best companies to work for in the state of Utah. I’m pleased to announce that we’ve been recognized again for 2010! The details will be in the December issue of Utah Business Magazine. The following are some of our company values that have helped us get to this point along with a few specific examples of how they’ve been put into action:

  1. Customers first – Here’s a quote from a recent interaction between our support team and one of our customers:

    “I just want to let Mozy know how absolutely fantastic it was to deal with Jessica at your Live Chat center. I am a techno idiot and she was extremely patient and reassuring. She went way above and beyond to help with with my issues. One of my most dreaded tasks (even more than going to the dentist or doctor) is contacting tech support. This is the first time I did so without having a homicidal ideation.”

  2. Innovation – Check out my last post about innovation as well as the one about our open source projects. We’re working on some great innovative stuff here and promising even more in the pipeline!
  3. Quality – We use Net Promoter score as one of our indicators for customer satisfaction with our products. When we introduced our Win 2.0 client we saw a material increase in our Net Promoter scores. In addition to the streamlined user interface and faster upload speeds, the overall quality of the release has helped increase our customer satisfaction. Yeah for Mozy Win 2.0! P.S. – Did you know we’re working on a Mac 2.0 release right now too? Stay tuned!
  4. Teamwork – Since there are a few of us who like to ride bikes at Mozy we made some jerseys and wore them as we rode in this year’s Utah Lake Century Epic Ride (ULCER). We enjoyed that pain so much that a few of us created our own biathlon event this Fall. We rode our bikes from the Mozy office in Pleasant Grove to the Timpooneke trailhead at the base of Mount Timpanogos. We left our bikes with one of our team members while we hiked/ran to the top (11,749 feet) and then ran back down. We then rode our bike up and over the scenic byway called the “Alpine Loop” and back to the office. And there are many other examples of Mozy teamwork both in and out of the office.

The things that make Mozy great in Utah are also present across our other locations in Washington, Ireland, the UK and China. All of this comes together to make Mozy an awesome place to work, and the awesomer the workplace, the awesomer the product gets! If you’re interested in working at Mozy, check out our careers page and send us a resume!

Be safe! :)

Vance

Frightful Computer Haiku Contest Winners

Five hundred entries
Who would have imagined it?!
Difficult to choose

Some made us chuckle
Some cleverly created
Some were just out there

But we loved them all!
Thanks for the entertainment
And sharing your skills

Announcing the three
Winners of cash and great fame!
Congratulations!

  • System seems cozy
    Until malware is nosey
    Glad I have mozy
    -David von Arb
  • Found secret e-mails,
    So his lap top learned to fly.
    Hope he had mozy.
    -Holly Lemieux
  • Drive fried, files Inside
    with many thanks to mozy
    for saving my hide
    -A Segal

And other favorites
No cash, but a little fame
Were also favorites

  • Deleted work files
    Adventurous nine year old
    No match for Mozy
    -Karen Webb
  • Where for art thou files?
    Six feet under dead and cold
    Should have got MOZY
    -CherylDC
  • Nothing. Nada. Zilch.
    Once desktop but now doorstop.
    All memory gone.
    -Linda Johnson
  • The hot blond’s email
    is somewhere on my hard drive.
    Backup for true love.
    -David Fink
  • Photos fill our lives
    Shh, it happens to hard drives
    Mozy rescues all
    -Stew Stryker
  • What was lost is found
    Mozy down Memory Lane
    Order is restored
    -Kathy Nichols
  • Mozy lets me save
    my cat, Phil, from a house fire
    and leave my PC
    -Marci Nelson
  • Mozy: My hero
    Until this awful contest
    Made me like Haiku
    -Pat Finnegan
  • Is this email real?
    “Hello from your old Girlfreind.”
    Boot Sector is fried.
    -Ron Oliver
  • Not just kilobytes
    My life’s work and memories
    Locked in a dead box
    -Patrick
  • I smell the ozone,
    Smokey tendrils from the fan,
    Was that my last click?
    -Steve Goodger
  • Notebook slides from lap
    Does not land like falling leaf
    Autumn brings no joy
    -Wendy Magnall
  • Hard drive hacks hair-ball
    Bits vanish into ether
    “No backup”, I wail
    -rich coco
  • If my computer
    had a mouth, i would punch it
    Please help me Mozy
    -Kevin Elam

A Very Mozy Halloween

Here at Mozy we support scary, as long as it doesn’t involve data loss. So in honor of Halloween – the scariest of holidays – every year we have a company pumpkin-carving contest. This year’s entries were pretty awesome, so without further ado, here are this year’s scary Mozy pumpkins:

Open Source and Mozy: The Debut of Mozy Code

The popularity of Mozy online backup confronts our developers with intense engineering challenges. Consider the scale that Mozy handles:

  • More than 1 million total customers
  • 60,000+ business customers
  • 50+ petabytes (or 50+ million gigabytes, if you prefer) of data
  • Customer data stored in multiple data centers around the globe

These numbers increase every day, relentlessly pressing us to keep refining Mozy’s storage infrastructure for faster throughput and more efficient storage.

Five years ago, Mozy was an aspiring startup with a vision for an affordable way to make data loss a thing of the past. We could not have achieved this goal without the availability of high-quality, freely available, open source software. We have relied upon, and contributed to, numerous free software projects to build the Mozy business.

Today, we step beyond simply contributing to existing projects with the public debut of Mozy Code. Mozy Code’s roots began with an internal program for fostering innovation among Mozy engineers called Mozy Labs, started in 2009. It soon became apparent that some of these internal projects could be of value to developers outside of Mozy for use in their own endeavors. For that reason, we have begun to identify some of our most promising and useful innovations, to make them available as Mozy-lead free software projects.

With Mozy Labs’ debut, we introduce two projects focused on high-speed I/O operations:

  • Mordor
    Mordor is an I/O library based on fibers that allows you to focus on performing a logical task, instead of how to make that task conform to a specific threading/event model. It provides lightweight, easy-to-use abstractions for complex concepts, while still providing superior flexibility. It can be used to build high performance network servers or simple data processing applications.
  • Ruby Protocol Buffers
    Originally created by Google, Ruby Protocol Buffers provides a way to encode structured data in an efficient yet extensible format. This library is optimized for rapid encoding and decoding, enabling high-performance communication between Ruby and C++ systems.

You can find out more about these first two projects on the Mozy Code website. Keep an eye out for future projects as we grow our list of projects.

Frightful Computer Haiku Contest

What? You haven’t thought of haikus since the 5th grade?! Well, that changes now. We want to see your best Frightful Computer Haiku, and we’re giving 100 bucks to our three favorites. Need a refresher on how to create a haiku? It’s simple. Line one is five syllables, line two is seven syllables, and line three is five syllables. Here’s one of our own as an example:

My hard drive hiccups
Fear for our precious photos
Wife would have my head!

To submit your Frightful Computer Haiku, add it as a comment on this blog post. If you really want to get us to notice them, post them to Facebook or Twitter with a link back to our blog post (use the hashtag #mozyhaiku if you’re on Twitter)! Good luck and get original! We’ll post winners on Friday, October 29, 2010. One entry per person, please.

HDD vs SSD

Is the battle for data storage supremacy over? Have hard disk drives finally left solid state drives eating their dust or have SSDs finally overtaken HDDs and left the old-timers behind?

For those who aren’t familiar with the differences between the two, here they are in a nutshell: hard disk drives or HDDs rely on a moving actuator and a read/write head to read or write data on spinning disks. Solid state drives or SSDs, on the other hand, have no moving parts. In most cases, they rely on NAND-based flash memory.

So, as of today, which technology holds the upper hand for data storage? Have a steaming cup of coffee while I fill you in on the latest.

Which drive can store more for less?

Aside from being more affordable, hard disk drives are still preferred because of their larger storage capacities. But the disparity between their capacities is gradually shrinking.

Unfortunately, the same thing cannot be said for their price tags. Today, you can find 1 TB hard disks below $100. As for 1 TB solid state drives, you’d be extremely lucky to find one that would cost below $1,000. As a matter of fact, $2,000 to $4,000 pricetags for 1 TB SSDs are quite common.

And by the looks of it, things aren’t going to change much in the near future if we talk about their differences in costs per GB. Some analysts even think they’re going to remain this way for 5-10 years.

Drive Performance

This is where SSDs reign supreme. Because HDDs have to move an actuator arm, read/write head, and disk platters to access data, there’s a substantial delay compared to SSDs. While this may be unnoticeable for regular users, power users – who typically open multiple applications at the same time – will easily see the difference.

Start up, random access, and reading activities are all faster for solid state drives compared to hard disks. Remember those times when you had to defragment your drive to improve performance? This isn’t necessary anymore with solid state drives.

To top it all, an SSD does all this at a lower power consumption rate. Hard disks drain energy faster because some energy has to be allocated for moving the heads and spinning the platters. That’s why computer manufacturers once successfully sold out large quantities of notebooks with SSDs. Some users were attracted to their long battery lives.

Storage reliability issues

Now, what about reliability? In this aspect, which one has a clear advantage over the other? Most businesses – and perhaps even regular users – will prefer a storage device that can offer a better guarantee for the safety of their data

Having a drive with a large capacity or faster performance is great, but if you haven’t backed it up and can’t retrieve any of your data from it again, that’s going to translate to huge financial losses, missed opportunities, and wasted time.

So which technology has the edge in this department? Let’s take a closer look.

HDD Storage Reliability

Theoretically speaking, HDDs are supposed to be more susceptible to failures because of their moving parts. They can also fail for a variety of reasons: head crashes, too high temperature, too low temperature, static electricity, power surges, vibrations, or pollution of the air inside the sealed unit.

Failure rates of different HDDs can be as low as 3% and as high as 13%. As HDDs get older, they suffer from wear-and-tear and hence become more prone to failures; they typically exhibit failure rates of at least 6% for those units that are more than 2 years old.

HDDs can maintain acceptable failure rates only up to 3 years. Beyond that, you’d be exposing your data to high risks. By comparison, SSDs are expected to stay reliable up to 10 years… but again, that’s theoretical.

SSD Storage Reliability

When the netbook craze first started, manufacturers opted to use SSDs was because of their low power consumption and low failure rates during lab tests.

Interestingly, however, their supposed reliability didn’t manifest in the outside world. Failure rates of 10% to 20% were being reported for some netbooks carrying SSDs (many times a SSD can fail due to the controller, not the drive itself). By contrast, netbooks carrying HDDs had failure rates of 2% or less.

Still, because of their relatively higher prices, SSDs haven’t been used as extensively in desktops and servers as HDDs have. Thus, the experience of netbook users can’t be the sole gauge in determining whether HDDs are more reliable.

Summary

What can learned from these figures is that over time, SSDs and HDDs can have failure rates greater than 10%. That’s not good by any standard and that doesn’t bode well for people who rely so much on their data to keep their business running (and in this age, who doesn’t?).

Therefore, regardless what type of drive you use, it is important that you perform regular backups to your data. Just because you have a solid state drive holding your data doesn’t mean it’s safe from failure.

About the Author

Eric Nagel manages OnlineBackupsReview.com where he reviews online backup services, including Mozy, and reports on the latest industry news. He also provides readers an exclusive 15% off Mozy promotional code so they can save on the only 5-star-rated online backup service, Mozy.

Innovation & Excitement at Mozy

Mozy has always been a pioneer in the online backup space. We’ve brought numerous innovations to market, ranging from our super-scalable multi-petabyte architecture to a simple user interface that keeps your data protected automatically and securely. We’ve been the first mover in many areas, including online backup for the Mac and local backup integrated with online backup. We’ve also innovated in terms of our business strategy by proving that a single product line can fulfill the needs of organizations ranging from my local bike shop to one of the world’s largest and most admired companies. We’ve also proven that small companies acquired by larger ones can continue to exist and even thrive post-acquisition. (Thanks EMC!) I am proud to be part of Mozy because of what we’ve done, and as we look forward, I’m very pleased to pre-announce some of the exciting innovations and improvements that are on the near-term horizon:

  • A totally revamped restore experience. After all, the most important part of what we do is returning your data to you when you need it. Did you know that we restored 96,941,938 files for our customers via the web and physical media (e.g., DVD) last month? If you include restores handled directly by our Mozy client software, the number becomes well over 100 million! (I was going to cite a number for the year, but there were too many ###’s and the spreadsheet blew up.)
  • The ability for our valued resellers to co-brand the Mozy service for their customers. Did you know that we have 4,500 resellers around the globe? (Thanks resellers!)
  • Expansion of our service to new geographies with full language translation, localization and support. Did you know that we have customers in over 100 countries? (Hier kommen wir!)
  • Features that go beyond online backup and allow you to leverage the data you’ve secured with Mozy for more than just recovering from a disaster. Did you know that a wildfire in grassy, flat terrain can scorch 3,000 acres in an hour? (Don’t worry, we’ll always keep our “backup & restore” value proposition even as we expand the business!)

We love to hear from our loyal fans and I’m sure there are a lot of questions about when all of this great stuff is going to happen. The short answer is that everyone is heads-down keeping everything running smoothly and working on all of the new stuff at the same time, but we can’t announce solid dates just yet. Just know that there will be detailed communication via our newsletters, press releases and website collateral at the appropriate times. Anyway, I simply couldn’t pass up the opportunity our marketing team gave me to use our blog as a forum in order to share my personal excitement about where we’ve been and, more importantly, where we’re going.  Thanks and be safe!

- Vance

VP of Operations

Nouveauté Mozy en France!

We recently kicked off a new and exciting chapter in the history of Mozy with the launch of Mozy.fr. Following the recent successful launches of Mozy.co.uk and Mozy.ie, the launch of Mozy.fr represents the first localized Mozy website on the European continent and is the first time Mozy has been available for purchase directly, on a Mozy website, in a language other than English. Fittingly, Mozy France was launched before an audience of enthusiastic journalists and bloggers at the Carpe Diem Café in downtown Paris. In true Parisian style, the food was exceptional and the conversation engaging.

Mozy is in France!So why did we pick France for the first release for a non-English version of Mozy? Having two native French speakers on staff is always helpful, but the market opportunity in France was also hard to ignore. One trend that we’ve noticed since first launching Mozy more than 4 years ago has been the growing global demand for our backup services. Even though our website, software, and support has only been available in English until now, a significant number of our millions of users come from countries outside of the USA. In fact, there are happy Mozy users in more than 100 countries around the world! With a tech savvy population of over 62 million and an increasing number of requests from our fans in France, we felt it was time to return the favor and make Mozy website, software, and support available in their native tongue. Furthermore, our Mozy.fr, Mozy.co.uk, and Mozy.ie customers benefit by having their valuable data secured at an EU based data center.

What’s next for Mozy? Stay tuned. Without giving too much away, we expect to launch Mozy websites in 2 additional countries this year with many more to come in 2011.  As long as we have delighted users demanding our services, we’ll do our best to return the favor. Did I mention we have staff who speak… :)

Be Safe.

The Sage Rosenfels Memorial Mozy Fantasy Football League

I just stuck my head out the window, and to quote John Madden, “it’s hittin’ weather.” And if it’s “hittin’ weather,” it can mean that we’ve just been charged with a misdemeanor, or it’s time for some for football. Here at Mozy, we love four things:

  • Backing up our customer’s important data
  • A warm crepe, the New York Times and a 1963 Chianti
  • Hall & Oates 1982 masterwork “H20”
  • Fantasy Football

In fact, we’re so excited for the upcoming football season that we want to involve twelve of you to join us in a season long, fantasy football-fest.  We’ll be running the league from our corporate offices, and have twelve openings for team managers. Email us at contest@mozy.com and let us know why we should select you for one of these twelve coveted spots as well as letting us know which NFL team you root for. We’re picking the participants on Tuesday, so make sure you email us before then (automatic snake draft happens on Wednesday). And remember, we will only select the most dedicated, ferociously feverish fans to join us.

The winner will receive bragging rights and the following prize package:

  • 200,000 Delta SkyMiles to fly to any NFL game, anywhere in the WORLD Delta flies
  • An official NFL jersey of your choice. Signed by Mozy!
  • Some free Mozy accountage
  • A hearty slap on the back

There will also be occasional weekly prizes for those teams that feature great performances by backup players, killer stats from the bench, or other incredible feats.

Why are we doing this, you ask? Well, besides the fact that both football and Mozy are awesome, we love backups of all types. In fact, some of our favorite backups are in the NFL. Chester Taylor, Felix Jones, Mark Brunell, and our own personal favorite, Sage Rosefels. One day you backups will rise up and dominate! Just like our own Mozy backups do.

So what are you waiting for? Request your own team and get ready to travel the world with your newfound fame.

Mozy Makes Cameo at VMworld 2010

Thousands of technologists attend VMware’s annual conference VMworld to increase their skills and discover what exciting new things the company is working on. One of the technologies previewed in San Francisco today by VMware’s Chief Technology Officer Dr. Stephen Herrod involved Mozy.

What Herrod unveiled was VMware’s “Horizon” project—a tool that will help busy IT administrators simplify the lives of the end users they serve. When an end user logs on from any Horizon-managed computer, he can access every application that has been assigned to him. These applications could be Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) applications, like Google Docs or Salesforce.com. But they can also be traditional desktop applications, such as Microsoft Word, which get installed on demand when the user needs them using VMware’s ThinApp technology.

So what does any of that have to do with Mozy? Traditional desktop applications store their data by saving files onto a local or network drive. But in an organization where employees might move from computer to computer (either from desk to desk, or from work to home), you need your files accessible across devices and locations, and that is where cloud storage comes in.

Storing files securely in the cloud is exactly what Mozy does, so we were delighted to support the Horizon team with technology that synchronizes the user’s files between the Mozy storage cloud and the local computer. This technology complements Horizon, fulfilling the cloud’s promise of complete mobility for end users, not only for SaaS applications but for desktop applications, too—along with the user’s files.

We were pleased to work with VMware in support of the VMworld preview of Horizon, and hope to continue collaborating together on promising projects.