How we love to squeeze the cloud for all it’s worth

The holiday season is yet another opportunity to consider how much influence cloud computing has in our lives. For example, have you:

•  Sent holiday greetings and family photos using your Facebook or Gmail account?

•  Purchased any gifts from or other online stores?

•  Downloaded and watched a favorite holiday movie or TV show from Netflix?

•  Downloaded a new or favorite holiday song from iTunes on your handheld device?

If you have, then you have benefited from the cloud.

Although all of us are taking advantage of the cloud, do we ever consider how different life would be without it? For example, what happens when the weather turns bad? Are we prepared for a bad day of cloud computing?

Will your holiday greetings and sharing of family photos be delayed? Will your online order arrive late? Will you be watching “It’s a Wonderful Life” after the holidays? Will you be tapping your fingers wondering when you’ll get to hear “It’s the Most Wonderful Time of the Year”?

Come again?

Believe it or not, lots of people (to be exact, 51 percent of 1,000 people surveyed) think that bad weather affects cloud computing. And of those 1,000 people surveyed, 95 percent don’t think that they use the cloud. These are the same people who:

•  Bank online

•  Shop online

•  Use social networking such as Facebook and Twitter

•  Store photos online

•  Store music online

•  Play online games

Granted, the Wakefield Research survey was conducted more than two years ago; however, even today many who regularly use the cloud aren’t always aware that they are in fact enjoying many everyday conveniences because of the cloud.

Surprisingly, some university students aren’t sure what the cloud is. Surprising because it is students who have embraced the benefits of the cloud perhaps more enthusiastically than any other single group. Yet when a senior executive veteran of the IT industry asked (via a Skype call!) a group of university students enrolled in a digital journalism class if they had ever used the public cloud, no hands went up. Eventually, one student tentatively offered up “Google Docs?”

Those of us who use the cloud and can also define what the cloud is and the countless benefits it provides—such as backing up our data and safeguarding it should  it ever need to be restored—need to do a better job of educating the masses that the cloud is an important part of life. All of us use the cloud and benefit from it greatly every day.

Some will continue to define the cloud as a “fluffy white thing.” Others will define it as a place to store, access, and share data using their Internet-connected device. But all will continue to enjoy life made easier and more enjoyable because of the cloud—even if Buffalo gets another five feet of snow.

So, if you haven’t already done so, now might be the perfect time to download “The Christmas Song” by Nat King Cole.

Happy holidays.


My name is Eric and I work for Mozy

Mozy scored big when they got years of expertise in technology by hiring Eric, otherwise known as Magnum PI around the office (Tom Selleck would be proud of Eric’s stash!). Eric passes many  tech companies that would love to have him as he endures a long commute from his serene sprawling ranch here in Utah.

I define my workspace as…

Wherever I am with my laptop; I don’t necessarily have to be at my desk in order to be productive. When I’m at my desk it’s lined with my kid’s sports schedules and Hot Wheels cars.

A device I can’t live without….

My mobile phone. I use it to email and text for work. Also, it connects into my second most essential device—my car, via Bluetooth.

When I arrive at work, I typically start my day off by…

Checking my calendar and email. I have usually already checked email before I get to work see if any communications have been received from our Cork, Ireland, office since part of our team resides there.

My work routine is…

Depends on the projects that are on my docket. We have regular meetings to discuss the progress of projects and what hurdles need to be removed in order to complete those projects. I also spend time generating reports, updating documents, and meeting with outside groups to get our products updated and released through the same channels as the Mozy product groups.

I do/do not listen to music at work and it helps me work better because …

Yes, when the environment becomes noisy or I’m trying to shut out other distractions in order to focus on a specific task.

The best advice I can give a recent college graduate looking to do what I do is …

Be teachable, listen to your co-workers, and choose your mentors wisely. There are many aspects to this position and it takes a long time to become adept at all of the nuances, so be patient. Be polite, you will have to work with those that you are working with now on another project in the future. It helps to treat everyone with respect and it makes everybody’s day better.

Outside of work, I am passionate about …

My family’s activities. Coaching basketball. Completing projects at home.

My eating habits are …

I say they are healthy, but my coworkers think they are bland. I try to eat reasonable portions, but I am accused of being boring in this regard.

If I could be someone for a day – I would be …

A high school teacher, perhaps in history or shop. I like working with youth and would like to make history interesting for a day or work on a classic car in a shop class.

The “secret sauce” that makes me who I am …

I am driven to completing tasks. I organize everything into tasks and that’s probably why I became a project manager; it’s a good fit. I also am a stickler for recognizing other’s efforts. I think it’s important to acknowledge co-workers when they have gone out of their way to assist you.


*Join Eric on the Mozy team!  For more details on starting your career at Mozy go to

Droplets vs. files: Comparing what specific clouds can store

Just as various cloud formations are comprised of different densities of water, various cloud storage servers are filled with several types of files. Some are large and require lots of storage space, while others are small and can be packed in tightly. You can protect all of your company’s important data with Mozy’s enterprise cloud backup solution.  Sign up for our 30-day free trial.

MozyEnterprise Online Backup

Want to win new customers? Get engaged!

Ever hear of employee engagement? It is, in part, when management takes a genuine interest in employee development. When employees do a good job, they’re recognized and praised. When employees need improvement, they are coached and given the tools necessary to become better employees.

Although all employees have weaknesses—some that may never go away—those weaknesses can be minimized by focusing on developing employees’ strengths. In other words, managers should be focusing on what employees are good at.

In its latest State of the Global Workplace: Employee Engagement Insights for Business Leaders Worldwide report, Gallup Chairman and CEO Jim Clifton writes about what business leaders can do to improve employee engagement and performance at the companies they lead.

“Trying to get employees to fix their weaknesses doesn’t work,” Clifton states. “Weaknesses can’t be developed much at all—but employees’ strengths can be developed infinitely. The problem is, too many companies focus on fixing weaknesses, and this only breeds non-engagement or, worse, active disengagement.”

A whopping 87 percent of workers are not engaged, meaning they are emotionally disconnected from their work and therefore are less likely to be productive. In other words, “Work is more often a source of frustration than one of fulfillment,” Gallup reports.

What’s interesting about employee engagement may surprise you.

When leaders are doing their job to develop plans around their employees’ strengths, employees will be more productive. “When employees work from strengths, nothing motivates them to achieve more—not money, not love, not vacations, not good benefits…,” according to Clifton.

And the benefit of that productivity? Winning new customers.

Winning new customers is certainly important today, but it will be particularly important for a company’s future strength and growth. According to Gallup’s report, the world’s gross domestic product (GDP), which is the value of the production of goods and services adjusted for price changes, is US$60 trillion. In the next 30 years, that amount will more than triple to US$200 trillion. That statistic should cause any company to salivate as it anticipates gaining new customers. Within the next 30 years the global economy will have US$140 trillion of new customers.

To win some of those customers, a business is going to have to be sure that its employees are engaged. According to Gallup, “Countries that double the number of engaged employees in every company will be best positioned to win the lion’s share of the $140 trillion in new customers.”

Where does employee engagement really begin? Communication! Leaders and managers who communicate honestly and frequently with employees, and employees who communicate informally with each other, will begin to breed a culture of engagement, according to the Gallup report.

Talking to improve business isn’t just some ethereal idea that’s up in the clouds. Said theoretical physicist and cosmologist Stephen Hawking: “Mankind’s greatest achievements have come about by talking, and its greatest failures by not talking.”

So start talking and developing a culture of engagement. It’s good for managers, employees, and winning new customers.

Frightful and delightful: Haiku winners announced

Congratulations to our Frightful Computer Haiku Contest winners! Your submissions were delightful, with some even raising the hairs on our neck.  There were so many scary submissions that we nearly pulled our hair out trying to select three winners. Truly, the creativity was sufficiently creepy. Of the many submissions, the following were selected as being a slash above the rest. Each will receive a $50 gift certificate for their award-winning haiku.

Lightning flashes down.
Hard drive’s dead, but Mozy screams:
Alive! It’s aliiiive!
Daniel Gibby

he killed my hard drive
but my files, like zombies, creep
back with a vengeance.

Dark and “cloud”less night
Beware the hard drive killers
Better get Mozy
Glen McAfee

Again, congratulations to our three winners. We hope to continue our Frightful Computer Haiku Contest next year, so if you didn’t win a gift certificate, there’s always next year! Five…seven…five…I can do this… Until then, remember that by using Mozy to back up and protect your files, you’re already a winner.

My name is Mark and I work for Mozy

Editor’s note:  Mark was one of the first Mozy employees and is a familiar smiling face to all. In the early days, Mark was a team of one. These days he manages a team of five that oversees all of Mozy’s global tech documents. He is a family man and a dedicated super fan of the University of Utah. Go, Utes!


I define my workspace as…

Slightly messy with mementos from my coaching past. I tried to make it a little personal with some family photos as well.

A device I can’t live without….

My smart phone. I am on it all the time. The first thing I do when I wake up is check my mail and social media.

My work routine is…

Very sporadic. It really depends on the day, some days I am in meetings most of the day while others I am working on projects most of the day at my desk.

I do/do not listen to music at work and it helps me work better because …

It depends upon my mood. Sometimes I blast the music through the headphones while at other times I like it quiet so I can concentrate better. If I am writing a lot I prefer to not have music playing. While if I am researching something I prefer to have music playing.

The best advice I can give a recent college graduate looking to do what I do is …

Practice your writing skills. I have noticed recently that a lot of college students and graduates lack the ability to write well. I finished my MBA not that long ago and had to do group projects a lot. I was amazed at how many students couldn’t write very well.

Outside of work, I am passionate about …

Coaching lacrosse. I coached football for 5 years before moving onto lacrosse. I really enjoy sports and working with the young men on my team and getting to know them.

My eating habits are …

Terrible. I actually probably eat better at home because my wife does most of the cooking during the week. I definitely could eat healthier.

If I could be someone for a day – I would be …

Michael Jordan in his hay day especially when they were crushing the Utah Jazz.

The “secret sauce” that makes me who I am …

I think my secret sauce is to have fun doing what you are doing while working hard. For those people that know me know I am always cracking jokes and trying to have a good time.

One thing that makes me unique is….

I have a large occipital protuberance.


Elvis would be all shook up with today’s smartphone

Remember those photos of a young (and now a very wealthy) Elvis Presley with a phone in hand sitting in his Cadillac? The phone was a standard-size home phone attached to what must have been a huge base. Everyone thought that was too cool to be real. A phone in a car? Get real!

The cost of a car phone was out of reach for nearly everyone in those days; nevertheless, we all dreamed of enjoying that same convenience—a phone outside the home.

Those Elvis images were shot 50 or so years ago. How life—and the phone—have changed! For most of us, everyday life and a “phone away from home” have become inseparable. Even so, it’s certainly not accurate to say that everyone in the world owns a cell phone today, though the number of cell phone subscriptions makes it seem so.

There are 7 billion people on earth and there are 6.8 billion cell phone subscriptions. But that does not mean that 6.8 people have a cell phone subscription; many people have multiple subscriptions. However, today there are far more subscription holders of cell phones than there ever were people with landlines. In fact, 40 percent of U.S. households rely solely on cell phones. In the UK, more than half of Britons rarely or never use their home phone; in fact, many don’t even remember their number.

And if you think small salaries and third-world economies are barriers to having a mobile phone, you’d be wrong. Even in developing countries there is an average of 90.2 subscriptions per 100 inhabitants (compared to 10.6 fixed telephone subscriptions per 100 inhabitants), according to the International Telecommunication Union.

What all of this means is that cell phone subscriptions will continue to increase, in large part because a cell phone can be used for more than just talking and doesn’t require the costly copper wiring network of a fixed phone. In the United States, 86 percent of cell phone owners use their phone for texting, 82 percent to access the Internet, 75 percent for email, and 63 percent for social networking, according to The Nielsen Company.

What’s clear is that today’s phone is a tool for doing things that Elvis with his car phone would never have thought possible. Consider the following:

•  Alarm system without monthly fees: Increase the safety of your home with security, video monitoring, and automation technology accessed by your smartphone, all with no monthly fees.

•  Keyless locking system: Did the plumber arrive after you had to leave for work? Unlock your home door’s deadbolt without a key or code. Guests can have access for a few hours to days at a time.

•  Programmable air vent:  Save money by programming your home’s heating and air condition vents to open and close at optimum times.

•  More than a thermostat: Why get out of bed on a cold winter night? This thermostat can be controlled from anywhere, and it can “sense” when you’ve gone and then automatically adjust the settings.

•  Efficient lawn sprinklers: When a rainstorm hits but you’re at work or on vacation, put your lawn sprinkler system on a 24 hour snooze. And you can quickly adjust the watering times for each zone.

•  Send videos (and music) to your TV: Plug this device into an HDTV and then send your favorite show to your TV. Out on a date and the babysitter needs a new show for your kids? Find it and send it from the restaurant.

We love our smartphones because they let us do things much more conveniently. If Elvis were with us today he might be crooning, “Take my hand, take my whole life too, but I can’t help using my cell phone to call you…and adjust the thermostat!”

Are you making the most of your smartphone?

Are you using the Mozy mobile app? If not, you’re missing out on an easy way to securely view and download files directly to your smartphone or other mobile device. It’s fingertip access to a more convenient way of doing things. We call it mobile app-titude. Elvis would call it a phone with a V8.

The timeline of computer processor speed

In 1943 IBM’s president said that the world market for computers was only five! If he were around today he would be amazed at the progression of speed in the computer processor. Take a look at this infographic that details the progression of processor speed from the first transistor computer to the XBox One.

Data commute does not compute!

Look around any office today and you’re likely to see a wheeled laptop bag parked beside many of the desks.  Why the wheels?  Well, we’re all carrying more than just a laptop.  There’s likely to be a tablet and a big-screened smartphone in there too – along, perhaps, with an external hard drive, a couple of USB keys and maybe even a sandwich.

The thing is, we’re carrying so many data devices with us nowadays that we can’t… well ‘carry’ them anymore.

That set us to wondering how much data is actually being toted around by commuters every day.  And had us guessing how safe that data is too.  So much is said about the amount of data on the “Information Superhighway” but so little has been said about data on the *actual* highway.

We took on the task of finding out and, for the first time, we’re lifting the lid on the true scale of the data drain caused by laptops, smartphones, USB drives and hard drives carried by modern commuters in New York, San Francisco, London, Paris, Berlin and Munich

The results are pretty shocking:

    • The average commuter takes 470GB of company data home with them at the end of every day
    • That’s 2,500 times the amount of data they’ll move across the internet in the same timeframe
    • Every day, 1.4 exabytes of data moves through New York City alone – that’s more data than will cross the entire internet in        a day
    • As much as 33.5PB of data will travel over the Oakland Bay Bridge every day
    • As much as 49 PB of data will travel through the Lincoln Tunnel each day
    • Up to 328PB of data travels in the London Tube network every day
    • Up to 69PB of data leaves Munich’s Hauptbahnhof on a daily basis
    • The Paris Metro carries as much as 138PB of data every day
    • With 41.33% of people having lost a device that stores data in the past 12 months, huge amounts of business data is put at        risk every rush hour

The thing is, there isn’t a CIO we know who would risk sending massive volumes of data over the internet without protecting it first.  But businesses in New York alone send more data home with employees than is transmitted across the internet globally every day – and the levels of protection applied to that data can be extremely light.

A thief holding up a New York subway car at rush-hour capacity could walk away with over 100TB of data.  Though, of course, what’s more likely is that they’ll run off with a single commuter’s bag – but even that could have a big impact on the business they work for if it doesn’t have another copy of the data on their laptop.

It’s not just large volumes of data that we carry with us, it’s also the most-critical data; the edits to the contract that we’ve just worked through in today’s meeting, the presentation that we’re giving tomorrow morning, the tax forms that you’re halfway through filling in.  Losing this data can have an immediate impact on a company’s success.

The data drain from our cities at the end of the working day could be a real issue for businesses – but it doesn’t have to be.  Backing up data on mobile devices has never been easier – gone are the days of devices needing to be connected to a corporate network in order to protect them.

But many businesses still fail to prioritize endpoints in their data protection strategies because they’ve not realized the extent of the vulnerability issue that mobility has caused or the ease with which they can protect themselves.

To see more details on where the data drains from our cities, check out our heat maps.


Frightful Computer Haiku Contest v4.0

Did you just feel someone—or something!—tapping you on your shoulder? That’s just a scary reminder that it’s time for this year’s Frightful Computer Haiku Contest. It kind of just creeps up on you, doesn’t it? Well, we wouldn’t have it any other way. After all, there’s no better time of the year than Halloween to create a scary computer haiku. The more clever, the better. A $50 gift card will be awarded to each of three individuals with the most frightful computer haikus.

Maybe you’ve forgotten how to write a haiku. No worries; it’s not difficult.

Haikus are composed of three lines. Simply follow this frightfully foolproof formula to create your haiku: Line one is five syllables. Line two is seven syllables. And line three is five syllables. Haikus that do not meet the 5-7-5 criteria will be disqualified and fed to the werewolves.

If you need a little more help, perhaps last year’s winning haiku will get your creative juices flowing (Dracula is already salivating):

Great-Grandma’s pictures–

Gone–but now back from the dead!

Wish she was back, too.

Oooo, does that not send shivers up your spine?

The winning haikus will be featured on our Facebook page and Twitter account.

To enter, simply comment on this post with your frightful computer haiku.

Frightful Computer Haiku Contest Rules:

-Your haiku must be original. Don’t just copy one of the ones someone submitted last year (or this year), because that’s just lame. Our gaggle of goblins will be keeping an eye on you to ensure compliance.

-Your haiku must be awesome, but that goes without saying.

-One entry per person. Please do not submit the same haiku over and over again because that too is lame and aggravates the judges.

-Submit your haiku by October 31, 11:59 p.m. MDT in the comments below. The winners will be announced on Friday, November 3.

That’s it! Pretty easy, right? So get your haiku on and submit away! Like this contest? Click here to tweet it!