Four key questions to ask your cloud provider

What questions should you ask before trusting your data to a cloud service? Not all cloud services are the same and by not asking key questions up front, you can leave your business exposed.

To highlight what can happen when you trust people with your data without checking them out first, Mozy carried out a hidden camera experiment asking a series of strangers in a coffee shop to look after a laptop. Find out what happened:

What should our man have asked before trusting anyone with his data?

  • How long will you look after it?
    Just as some of our participants only protected the data for a limited period of time, not all providers are in it for the long term. Find out how long the provider has been around and how committed to the market it really is.
  • Will you look at my data?
    Some participants in the experiment thought the data on our laptop might be of value to them. Some cloud providers will scrape your data to create anonomised information to sell on to advertisers. Encryption and privacy commitments are essential here – make sure your cloud provider has them.
  • Will you leave my data vulnerable?
    Some of the people in our experiment did very little to keep the data safe, leaving it unattended as they left the coffee shop and went about their business. Some cloud providers don’t encrypt data and some take physical security more seriously than others. Make sure that your cloud provider is storing your data on enterprise-class equipment, in tier 4 data centers and in an encrypted state at all times.
  • Can anyone take my data?
    In the film, we saw someone take the computer they were trusted with but we also had people who let a computer be taken from them. Data can be intercepted when using cloud services if the provider has failed to secure it. Ensure that your provider offers end-to-end encryption and transfers data over an SSL connection.

For more advice on what to ask before choosing a cloud provider, check out this whitepaper from IDC.

Starting the Year Off: Setting (and Achieving) Resolutions for SMBs

SMB Goals in 2014We’ve come a long way, baby.

That’s the underlying message from small-business owners about 2013, according to a new Manta survey.

The poll shows some 72% of SMB leaders characterized the past 12 months as a period in which their companies flourished. The grimmest days of a recession-bound marketplace may be behind us, after all.

Good news, if it’s the case, but that doesn’t mean these SMB owners are resting on their laurels. Instead, the plan for the year to come seems to be growth, to push even harder. Let’s look at where small businesses say they are headed next, and break out some of the tips that can help them — and you — achieve a similarly successful 2014.

Working for the Best: SMBs on This Year’s Goals

Marketing is the word for the new year, according to the Manta poll. Small-business owners — 40% of them — said that finding new ways to promote their company would be the priority between now and December.

Other resolutions included:

  • 21% said improving customer service and bringing in new clients topped the list
  • 14% plan to launch new products, or upgrade and enhance the goods and services they currently provide
  • 9% said that increased networking was a primary goal
  • 5% intend to delegate more responsibility to employees

What does this all mean? For one thing, online resources will likely play an even more prominent role.

“With almost half of small-business owners focusing on amplifying marketing and promotions, we can expect to see more [of them] leveraging techniques that capitalize on their online and offline networks and digital content and distribution strategies,” said Kristy Campbell, director of marketing and communications at Manta.”

How to Get There: Tips for Achieving in 2014

Whatever your goals may be, your business is more likely to prosper if you apply your energy and resources to them in fresh and smart ways.

Start with the following points. Each is geared to help your company write this year’s success stories, no matter what your resolutions may be.

  1. Align your personal and professional vision: This year, establish a vision for your business that is aligned with your personal vision. Your personal health and professional health impact each other, so it is important to maintain both. One way is by complementary goal setting.
  2. Create your own advisory board: Business owners don’t need to have all the answers. Consider developing a small-business advisory board. This can be in a more traditional format with knowledgeable experts, or you can create your own virtual boardroom through online forums, Google Hangouts and other Internet-fueled meet-ups.
  3. Give and grow: Giving back to those in your network–whether they are employees, other small-business owners or loyal customers–will help you to grow your own network and business. Exchanging advice, developing strong internal teams and enhancing your relationship with clients are all important parts of making your business thrive.

Goals set. Strategies in place. May 2014 be a year in which business is better than ever. Because, right now, for SMB owners, the numbers suggest that the future is looking bright.

 

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We’re Proud to Be On the List

Top Apps Employees Sneak Into the OfficeIf you’re a fan of Mozy (and it’s hard not to be if you like simple, automated, and comprehensive backup that includes everything—even the sync—and first-class support, and all of this for a bargain), you’ve probably seen the article in Business Insider about how Mozy is one of the top 50 apps employees sneak into work. Mozy is on the list at a respectable #18.

Now, I’m not a fan of sneaking apps into work. I tend to follow the workforce philosophy that was pounded into me while serving in the military: “If it isn’t issued to you, then you don’t need it!” But today’s workplace isn’t the same. For example, with more and more employees embracing the bring-your-own-device approach to get the job done, it’s not hard to see why so many of the apps on The Top 50 Apps Employees Sneak Into Work made it on the list. Today, I don’t believe it’s so much that employers are concerned about too much goofing off on company time with these apps; instead, it’s more that IT has concerns (and rightly so) about employee privacy and corporate data security. But as employees were quick to recognize the benefits of BYOD (such as workforce productivity and the flexibility for employees to do their work from just about anywhere and at any time), employers have recognized that it makes for good employee morale when the workforce is enthusiastic about getting the job done in a way that works best for them. It’s one of those win-win situations that isn’t going to go away.

But getting back to the list, clearly, some of those apps have nothing to do with work. However, these days, it’s not always easy to know why someone downloads an app at work. For example, while one employee may be checking their Google mail to see if their recent amazon.com order just shipped, another employee may be sending a work file to their Gmail account to so that they can work on it at home later that evening . (Clearly, this employee needs to learn about Mozy and quickly download the Mozy backup software with file sync capabilities and mobile access. And after he’s done that, he needs to share his knowledge with his fellow workers and manager. (I can hear the conversation now: “Sir, Mozy is complete data protection with anywhere, anytime file access. It’s time to boost productivity, sir!”)

While old habits are sometimes hard to break, I think I am changing my ways. I don’t have any issue with someone downloading Mozy on their work computer if it helps them do their job better and they’re more enthusiastic about doing their job because they can do it in a way that works best for them. And while the military way of “If it isn’t issued to you, then you don’t need it” approach isn’t always the wrong approach, sometimes there are better ways.

But if you’re going to download Mozy on your work computer, be sure to drop a line to your IT department about the benefits of Mozy. Mozy just makes good sense. And we’re #18 on the list to prove it.

Now, if you’ll excuse me, I need to check my latest LinkedIn news…

My name is Scott and I work at Mozy

Welcome to our first anniversary of the “My name is…”, our blog series on introducing you to some of our talented team members who directly contribute to the success of Mozy. Mozy has been fortunate to win “Utah’s Best Place to Work” four times in a row. We’re successful; our products are secure and sustainable, and we value our customers. Having said that, Mozy wouldn’t be the amazing place it is without our dedicated, passionate and generous team members. We are very fortunate to be surrounded by extremely intelligent people who inspire and motivate others around them.

This time, we’d like you to meet Scott Lee, our Director of Marketing. Scott is a key driving force behind all the marketing initiatives that we undertake for our business-to-business products and channel marketing for MozyPro and MozyEnterprise. Scott has provided some key insights to how and where Mozy should position itself, in the B2B space.

My name is Scott and I work at Mozy

I define my workspace as …
Depends on the day or time of day. Sometimes it’s a desk, sometimes a conference room, sometimes the hallway.

A device I can’t live without …
iPhone.
Author’s note: I mean, if you own an iPhone then you know this feeling (myself included)! How did we ever manage without it?!?!?

When I arrive at work, I typically start off by …
Filling up my water cup…must stay hydrated. I check email, the business dashboard, and then usually wander over to the sales team to see how things are going. Then off to meetings or whatever.

My work routine is …
I am a list guy. I make a list of objectives for each quarter, then a list of weekly projects or tasks, and manage to that each day. Of course it doesn’t all get done, but it keeps me focused on the big things while limiting as much minutiae as possible. I even schedule time in my calendar for tasks as if they were meetings. I also float around a lot to talk face to face with people, hear what they think, etc. It’s crazy how many great ideas come from actual conversations! #emailhasitslimits

I do/do not listen to music at work and it helps me work better because …
Definitely do. I have Spotify or Pandora on when I’m at my desk, usually listening to classical if I’m in a heavy analytical mindset, classic rock for pounding through email, or a mix of stuff if I’m writing/reviewing content.

The best advice I can give a recent college graduate looking to do what I do is …
Work hard, work smart, work with others not against them.

Outside of work, I am passionate about …
My family (my wife and I have five children), golf, road cycling, and college sports. Go Cougars!

My eating habits are …
Better than they have been for a while. I have a weakness for chips and salsa though.

If I could be someone for a day – I would be …
Jimmer Fredette in a Utah Jazz uniform.

The “secret sauce” that makes me who I am …
Intense curiosity.

New Year’s Resolutions and the Future of the Cloud

January is over. How are you doing with your New Year’s resolutions? If you’re like many who made goals about eating better and exercising, your efforts might already be paying off by way of a few lost pounds. As a result, you’re probably feeling better. You might even be enjoying mental clarity with that new-found energy that results from a healthier lifestyle.

Here’s something else that should add to your mental clarity: Mozy. That’s right. Mozy means peace of mind. And when it comes to backup, who doesn’t want peace of mind? After all, backup means protecting information and files that might not otherwise be replaceable should they ever be lost, whether by accident or some unforeseeable catastrophe. And speaking of peace of mind, here’s an interesting bit of recent cloud backup news that may not instill peace of mind for those who are currently backing up or even those who are still considering purchasing a backup service: 25 percent of cloud service providers will be gone by 2015, and acquisitions and bankruptcy will be the two primary reasons for their demise, according to research firm Gartner. “One in four vendors will be gone for whatever reason—acquisition, bankruptcy,” said Gartner analyst William Maurer as quoted in a Computerworld article. That should cause anyone who relies on cloud services to seriously ponder the question, “How strong is my cloud service provider?” and “Will it still be around next year?” And if you’re currently in the process of choosing a cloud service provider, Gartner’s research is no less unsettling. After all, how do you confidently choose a cloud service provider when there is a 25 percent chance that it might not even exist by the end of next year?

25% of Cloud Backup Providers Will be Gone by 2015

That should cause anyone who relies on cloud services to seriously ponder the question, “How strong is my cloud service provider?” and “Will it still be around next year?” And if you’re currently in the process of choosing a cloud service provider, Gartner’s research is no less unsettling. After all, how do you confidently choose a cloud service provider when there is a 25 percent chance that it might not even exist by the end of next year?

“There is real risk,” Maurer added. Gartner also predicts that when last year’s data is in, it will show that the portion of organizations using cloud services will have reached 80 percent. Truly, the cloud is no passing fad. It’s not even the future (though it certainly is in the future for the other 20 percent of organizations not yet taking advantage of the cloud)—it’s today. From the consumer to the SMB to the enterprise, the cloud won’t be blown away by any sudden wind but will become more and more a necessity. To be sure, the nature of backup will continue to change; however, cloud backup will remain a major part of data protection and doing IT efficiently. Recent research shows that public cloud computing services are definitely affecting IT strategy: nearly 80 percent of respondents to one survey report that cloud-hosted apps or cloud-based compute and/or storage services will have a significant impact into their storage-related strategic planning over the next five years.

It won’t surprise anyone to know that people tend to be very careful about their data and files, so trusting a cloud backup service may not be easy. But as a Mozy customer, you can be confident in the strength of the Mozy cloud (especially as you consider Gartner’s recent prediction about the future of 25 percent of cloud service providers and why they’ll be history by the end of 2015):

  • Mozy was already acquired (more than six years ago!).
  • Mozy is profitable.
  • Mozy is part of EMC’s Data Protection & Availability Division and its long-term strategy.

That’s food for thought that will encourage you to rest easy with Mozy—though it may not do too much toward helping you keep your New Year’s resolutions. But continue to eat healthy and exercise anyway. Just knowing that Mozy, your choice in cloud backup, is the most trusted name in cloud data protection should boost your energy levels. And you didn’t even have to say no to your favorite food or put on those exercise clothes. But let’s be clear: we’re not telling you to ignore your New Year’s resolutions. Say no to that piece of pastry! And consider putting on your running shoes and going for a jog at lunchtime. No worries. You can count on Mozy to back you up while you’re jogging, and anytime—this year, next year, the year after….

Tablet Takeover 2: Choosing a Tablet

All in the Family Infographic

Tablets are a mainstay in homes around the world now. So how much data does a typical family store? Learn more in our “All in the Family – Who Stores What?” infographic.

Apple recently announced next-generation iPads and again sent tech writers into fits of exultant exclamation marks. Thinner! Lighter! Faster! But new and improved tablets aren’t coming only from Apple. Microsoft just launched a new Surface model, and Nokia premiered the new Lumia 2520. Add to these well-regarded tablets from Samsung, Sony, Google, Amazon and others, and you’ve got a crowded market.

If you’re in the market for a tablet, how do you wade through the wide range of features, sizes, and price points? Here are some things to consider.

Operating system: Google, Microsoft, and Apple aren’t just battling to get their devices in your hands; they’re also competing for operating system domination. The OS matters for design and performance, but, for many end users, the difference is what’s available for these operating systems: apps, media and accessories. Currently, iOS offers the deepest library of apps and media. The downside is that iOS is available only on Apple products; Microsoft Windows Mobile and Google Android, in contrast, are available on devices from several different manufacturers.

Android offerings have improved dramatically in the past year and seem poised to continue on this trajectory. According to Strategy Analytics, Android was the OS on two-thirds of the 51 million tablets shipped in second quarter of 2013. iOS controlled 28% of the market, and Microsoft Windows Mobile had less than a 5% share. With such considerable market share, developers are racing to design products for the Android platform.

If you plan to use the tablet primarily to access email and the Web, all three of the major operating systems will suit your needs. But if you’re on the prowl for the buzz-worthy new apps and games, your best bet is with Android or iOS.

Hardware: Tablets generally in the 7-inch range or the 10-inch range. The smaller models sacrifice a degree of performance, but cost less and can fit in small bags.

Battery life: As you’d expect, battery life is less important if you’re using the tablet primarily from your couch than it is if you’re regularly trapped in coach on intercontinental flights. Most tablets from major manufacturers have batteries that last between 8 and 10 hours.

Storage space: If you plan to keep feature-length movies or your music library on your tablet, look for a model with 32 GB of storage or more.

Screen: For the most part, you can readily tell the quality of the screen by looking at it from different angles and judging its brightness. But if you’re a real graphics junkie, check out the Nexus 10 or the iPad Air. Both of these tablets have resolutions so sharp that the human eye cannot discern individual pixels.

Connectivity: All tablets are Wi-Fi-ready, but some can also connect to cellular networks. These cost extra for the technology, plus a monthly fee for the connection.

Price: Whatever your budget, you can find a tablet. A search of BestBuy.com found tablets ranging from $69.98 for the Azpen A701 to $1,929 for the Samsung ATIV Smart PC Pro 700T. While price will generally align with the number and quality of features a tablet has, CNET warns that buyers should look beyond price. For example, Amazon takes a loss on each Kindle Fire sale, keeping its cost lower than its features would indicate. On the other hand, iPads may lack some desirable features but justify their cost with overall quality.

Beyond these core considerations, look at the extras and determine which are most important to you. For example, many tablets–though, notably, not iPads–have memory card slots and USB ports. Several tablet devices have front and rear cameras, and, if you are planning on using your tablet at the beach, some devices (the Sony Xperia Tablet 7, for example) are waterproof.

In any case, when choosing from among a bunch of different tablet devices, nothing beats trying them for yourself. Check how comfortable you are with operating system and how easy it is to do the kinds of things you plan to do with the device. Once you’ve familiarized yourself with your options, do a little research on your selected models. There are several useful tablet reviews available online (such as those from CNET and Engadget).

And be certain to check back regularly: The next new tablets are just around the corner.

 

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Navigating a Successful Platform Partnership

Navigating a Successful Platform PartnershipPlatform partnerships are key to many corporate technology strategies. When their different services are integrated, companies are able to reach more customers, deploy new services and harness IT resources more efficiently.

Instore, a software company providing mobile point-of-sale solutions to retail merchants, has been able to grow its customer base through a network of technology partners. For example, Instore partnered with Mercury Payments to offer efficient payment processing out of the box instead of building an entirely new system from scratch.

Matt Niehaus, Instore’s CEO, explained that these kinds of integrations have been invaluable for helping his company meet growing customer demands.

“We get a large amount of requests from our merchant customers to help them grow their business and run more efficiently,” said Niehaus. “Example requests include online ordering, customer rewards, gift cards, and better analytics.”

Instead of building new product features using in-house staff, Niehaus and his team rely on partnerships with vendors to fill the gaps.

“Integration partners allow us to offer more services sooner,” said Niehaus. “We also save on the cost of developing these services, which can be quite large for complex features.”

Ensuring Alignment with Partners

Integration partnerships can be resource intensive and expensive to implement. Before decided to pursue a deal, Niehaus and his team look to ensure that both companies will derive a significant return on investment.

Currently, Niehaus and his team are working on setting up a partnership with an online food delivery service.

“We have an excellent alignment of interest in that both parties benefit quantitatively and qualitatively from the other’s services,” said Niehaus.

To ensure a successful product integration, Niehaus recommends that organizations look for partners with the following characteristics:

  1. They target a similar customer base.
  2. Their product(s) will help your company build its offerings comprehensively and over the long term.
  3. They aren’t a direct competitor and are unlikely to compete with your organization down the road.

While platform partnerships can initially require significant technical and IT resources, such as the need for engineering and customer support personnel, some organizations are now offering integrations through APIs (application programming interfaces), which don’t require the same kind of heavy lifting.

Not Just a Technical Issue

Platform integrations are not just a technical issues, however.

“It’s not enough to connect your technical teams to make the software work together,” said Niehaus. “You need solid interaction with marketing, sales and customer support.”

Indeed, because business considerations drive the partnership, business development and executive teams should be leading the process.

 

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MeetMe’s Video-Centered “Charm” App Could Finally Monetize Digital Dating

Welcome to Mozy’s App Profile, where we introduce new programs seeking to improve the way we live and socialize. This week, Mozy takes a look at Charm, an app that has a whole new take on the typical dating app.

Charm AppApp first, monetization later. At least, that seems to be a pattern these days. And what better way to monetize than to incorporate video? Currently, video is helping a new app called Charm stand out from among the dating app crowd.

Apps such as Tinder have taken the dating world by storm. Essentially a game of “hot or not,” Tinder prompts people to swipe left (reject) or right (approve) on users’ photos in the hopes of making a match. According to TechCrunch, the app has matched more than 50 million people and about 50% of users open the app on a daily basis. But even with the high volume of usage, Tinder’s path to profit is still unclear.

But, through its utilization of video, the Charm app by MeetMe is aiming to do more than just connect local singles. Given how both Google and Facebook are enjoying a spike in mobile advertising revenue from their footage-based ventures (YouTube and Instagram, respectively), MeetMe seems poised to monetize the digital dating world.

On the surface, Charm doesn’t differ much from existing romance apps out there. Like Tinder and OkCupid, Charm identifies potential matches based on proximity, prompts users to reject or approve other users, and enables successful matches to chat with each other. But instead of choosing from among the usual selfies, however, Charm prompts users to upload short video clips of themselves.

Catherine Cook, the co-founder and vice president of brand strategy for MeetMe, believes that people are tired of the static nature of mobile dating apps.

“A major benefit of the video approach to dating is that it doesn’t reduce people to just a profile photo,” said Cook in an interview with Wired. “Apps like Tinder make it very easy to dismiss or express interest based on a profile photo, but we don’t believe you can make a first impression with just a photo–which may turn out to be five to 10 years old. A video shows personality and a realistic sense of what a person actually looks like now.”

But regardless of the video-versus-photos debate, it’s likely Cook and her co-founder/brother Geoff Cook might not be looking to reinvent matchmaker formulas like Match.com or to emulate the bar scene like Tinder. The siblings’ vision for Charm–which Geoff calls “Tinder meets Vine”–could just be a purely lucrative endeavor, as the app’s distinguishing feature (video) opens the door for a more tangible media buy.

Video has certainly paid off in the past. According to Bloomberg, YouTube’s mobile advertising revenue tripled to $350 million in a span of just six months. And Instagram (via Facebook) has similar plans to monetize its popular video feature, finally tapping into its impressive 130 million-user base.

Charm is still in its infancy (see its introductory video, here), and its monetization plans will likely be put on hold until it has gained enough of a following to implement active media buys. But, assuming Charm can eventually boast similar user numbers as its digital dating competitors, the Cooks will finally have put a price on love.

 

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The Race to Be the ‘Netflix for eBooks’

A Statista study from earlier this year shows that the subscription model works–at least for movies and television shows: The study showed that Netflix subscriptions are nearly as common among adults aged 18 to 36 as cable television subscriptions. Hulu is another big player in this area, and Amazon has thrown its hat in the ring with its subscription Instant Video service. Among others, Spotify applies the subscription model to music. Indeed, with cloud and mobile technology pushing the popularity of subscription services to an all-time high, it’s no wonder that a new wave of companies is vying to become the “Netflix for e-books.”
Ebooks

In the Running

Scribd, Oyster and eReatah have all jumped into the e-book subscription arena, offering members access to a set number of e-books per month for a fee. But there are big names with big footprints already in the field, including Amazon’s Kindle Lending Library, which offers four times more titles than the relative newbies. (Amazon looks like it is also upping the ante with its recent purchase of Goodreads and the book sharing social network’s 16 million members.)

On the other hand, according to TechCrunch, being a newbie in tech world is sometimes an advantage in its own right. “Goodreads had over 16 million readers at the time of the deal, but the technology itself feels stagnant and dated, especially on mobile, potentially giving Oyster an edge,” the article stated.

The library liability

The biggest issue facing would-be Netflix services for e-books is as old as, well, Ben Franklin: Whereas unlimited access to movies for a monthly subscription was a new concept when Netflix emerged, the same isn’t true for books. The book-lending concept has been around as long as public libraries have been around–since Ben Franklin introduced the concept, around 1730.

Ben FranklinAnd not only do public libraries enable people to borrow books with actual paper pages, many are lending ebooks, as well–for free.

“[I]n addition to competing with e-commerce giant Amazon, whose empire began with bookselling,” wrote TechCrunch, “these startups compete with other so-called ‘Netflix for e-books’ outlets: (gasp!) local libraries.”

Scribd, for one, is not daunted: “Netflix is worth about $18 billion. Spotify is worth about $3 billion,” Trip Adler, Scribd’s co-founder and CEO, told Mashable. “I don’t see why there isn’t a similar opportunity in this space.”

Standing out from the crowd

Will Scribd, Oyster or eReatah become Netflix for e-books? Perhaps not. But does that mean the model will fail? Not necessarily. After all, people buy gym memberships even though running outside is free.

“A health club membership, like an ebook service subscription, is often an aspirational purchase for subscribers,” said the indie book publisher Smashwords in a blog. “As long as the reader wants to increase their reading in the future, they’re likely to maintain their subscription, even if they don’t actually read more.”

Interestingly, ebook subscriptions could find success for the very same reason they may not be the next Netflix: Books aren’t movies. Indeed, if there’s anything a potential industry disrupter might take away from from the ebook service race, it’s that such distinctions matter. Trying to recreate another industry’s disruption in one’s own is only asking for comparisons in which you are likely to come up short.

However, recognizing what the ebook lending companies have in common with Netflix–as well as with music streaming services like Spotify and iTunes Radio–helps create some context for the greater world of media consumption. Across the board, the competition is hottest in cloud-based technology: Consumers don’t need to own their media; they “simply” want access to it anytime and anywhere.

Life in the Cloud Quote

Learn more about the future of cloud services in our infographic, “Life in the Cloud”.

With their place in the digital media industry in mind, if Scribd, Oyster, eReatah or any other contender shoots for its own goals rather than Netflix’s, it might just become the “[insert provider name here] of ebook subscriptions.”

 

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Online Dating Technology and How It Affects Our Society

Online Dating TechnologyTinder, Lulu, Grouper. Unless you’re a part of the online dating scene, you might not even recognize that these are the names of websites. However, even if you are not currently looking for that perfect mate, it’s worth paying attention to these sites: Online dating is a revolutionary industry that can provide insight into your own customers.

As a small-business owner who’s operating a website, creating an app or selling an online service, digital dating sites may be one place to look for inspiration. Scott Steinberg, a technology and innovation consultant, believes that online dating platforms can be a “goldmine” for research: “The beauty of these platforms is they show us in a more human and personable way how we can deliver content, deliver messages, and ultimately let [users] interact with it.”

Depending on their ages or interests, people gravitate toward different dating services. For example, Match.com’s audience is different than the millennial audience of Tinder, whose members are looking for quick, mobile introductions and brief interactions via photos and messaging on their smartphones.

Analyzing these digital trends may help you gain a better grasp of your customers’ online expectations and preferences. Incorporate that research into your own products, and you may find the missing piece to your consumer research puzzle.

“People forget there’s the human element of technology, and people are expecting things to be very usable and to be very intuitive,” said Steinberg. “They want to jump right in and enjoy them.”

If you’re targeting younger generations, Steinberg believes there is quite a bit an outside company can learn from the online dating scene–not to mention potential partnership opportunities for customized services or ads and specialized promotions. Depending on their privacy policies, these online dating platforms may have massive amounts of user data available for those who partner with them.

“It’s about understanding better where [potential customers] live online and their behaviors, and how to better speak to them and target them,” he said. “What makes them tick?”

 

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