Tag Archives: cloud roundup

Cloud roundup and links of interest – August 15

Google Street View Offers Tour of NASA’s Kennedy Space Center

Visitors from almost anywhere on Earth can “see” and explore NASA’s Kennedy Space Center through a collaboration with NASA that allowed Google’s Street View equipment to capture 360 degree color images and place them online for a new generation of spaceflight fans

The panoramic images include such iconic vessels as the Apollo 14 command module capsule that returned three astronauts from America’s fourth mission to the moon in February 1971 and the Space Shuttle Atlantis which flew on its maiden voyage in October 1985.

Virtual visitors can browse the collection by clicking on the images and then “steering” through the exhibits using a control wheel on the top left of each image. Using the controls, visitors can roam around the KSC displays to learn more about its contents and history, according to an article on eWEEK.com.

The new KSC images are the latest in the Google Street View collection, which also includes panoramic views of notable places around the globe, including Historic Italy, California National Parks, and highlights of must-see sites in the United States, Poland, Israel, Russia and the magnificent Swiss Alps, says eWEEK.

Tired of Facebook Friends’ Endless Photos of Their Kids? Unbaby.me Can Help

Too many baby pictures on Facebook?Too many of your friends’ baby pictures cropping up on Facebook? There’s now a sure-fire (if slightly off-beat) way to fight back: Unbaby.me.

The photo-replacing plug-in is the brainchild of three New Yorkers — Yvonne Cheng, Chris Baker and Pete Marquis — who work together at the advertising agency BBDO. They are, unsurprisingly, in their late 20s and early 30s, according to the Los Angeles Times.

“We were having drinks one night after work and were joking around about how Facebook is just lousy with babies, and wouldn’t it be funny if you could replace all those photos with cats,” Cheng said in an interview with the Los Angeles Times.

The plug-in will scan your Facebook feed for key words such as “cute,” “adorable” and “first birthday” — trigger words that indicate a baby photo may be attached. You can also add your own key words. Then it replaces the offending baby photo with a different photo from an RSS feed of pictures. The current default feed is cat photos.

“Personally, I don’t hate babies. I love babies. But I do get tired of looking at babies,” Cheng said.

Nokia Windows Phone 8 Reveal in Early September Tips Insider

Nokia’s first Windows Phone 8 smartphones could be revealed as early as September, as the Finnish company attempts to beat Apple to the next-generation handset unveil, according to an article on Slashgear.com.

New phones running Microsoft’s latest smartphone OS are set to be announced next month, though availability is only said to be in time for the holiday shopping season.

Apple isn’t expected to confirm the iPhone 5 until midway through September. However, the company is likely to have the much-anticipated handset up for grabs within a month of that.

Exactly what the new Nokia devices will look like is unclear, but the company will probably stick to a style similar to the Lumia 800 and Lumia 900, Slashgear reports.

 

Mozy Stash

 

Cloud Roundup and Links of Interest – June 26

Retina MacBook vs. PC Laptops: The Battle Begins

At its recent Worldwide Developer Conference, Apple introduced the MacBook Pro with Retina display, its latest laptop. This appears to confirm that Apple will eventually merge its Air line with its MacBook line, a move long expected by Apple watchers.

Now that Apple has taken the wraps off its next-generation device, where does that leave the rest of the PC industry? PC World asks, “Can Apple’s new Retina MacBook Pro rain on the PC laptop or Intel’s Ultrabook parade? Or will Apple, once again, inspire another flood of PC clones as it did with the MacBook Air and the ensuing Ultrabook onslaught?”

Ultrabooks and other Windows-based laptops headed your way in the coming months are bound to be interesting once Microsoft releases the touch-friendly Windows 8, expected in October. Read more about it here.

Being More Productive With Mobile Tech

Businessman on mobile phoneThere’s no doubt mobile technology has changed our lives and the way we communicate. But it’s also a great way to keep ideas from fading away forever. ZDNet’s James Kendrick writes about the importance of having a mobile device handy at all times, and the benefits of being able to capture that great idea before your attention is pulled in another direction.

“Mobile technology plays a major role in my work, as it lets me capture ideas when they occur no matter where I am. Gadgets have evolved to be powerful information capture tools and also make content creation easy,” writes Kendrick.

“In the not-too-distant past many ideas would end up lost, but no longer. I grab information as it becomes available, and I use it to lay the groundwork for writing projects whenever a few minutes presents itself. I can leverage mobile tech to maximum effect, no matter what gadget I am holding.”

Seton Hall University Offers Lumia 900s to Give ‘Freshmen Experience’

Seton Hall University is going the extra mobile mile with an unusual initiative. It’s paired with AT&T and Nokia to distribute units of the popular Lumia 900 LTE Windows Phone to new incoming students in the class of 2016.

University faculty say the phones will help students have 24-7 access to Microsoft’s Office suite. They say the phone giveaway will provide a “more engaged and integrated learning experience,” according to DailyTech.

The phones also include an exclusive piece of content called the “Freshmen Experience”.

Something like a mini-social network, the feature “adds customized social media integration and direct communication channels with [students'] freshmen peers, peer academic advisors, housing information and roommates.”

 

Mozy Mobile Apps

 

Cloud Roundup and Links of Interest – May 31

Another Chance for Idle ElectronicsAnother Chance for Idle Electronics

More than 278 million mobile devices lie idle or deactivated in the United States, and nearly half are smartphones, according to consultants at Compass Intelligence.

Most of those devices are destined for the recycling heap, but as for the others, that’s cash sitting neglected in drawers, according to an article in The New York Times. Beats by Dr. Dre Studio headphones that sell for $270 new could be worth $200 used. A Wi-Fi-only 16-gigabyte iPad 2 costing $400 new could fetch $300 or more. See how to sell them for the highest price.

Hope for Innovation Is Found in the Cloud

Innovation isn’t dead, it just moved to the cloud, according to GigaOM.

Cloud computing has made innovation something anyone can do, said GigaOM’s Derrick Harris.

“Somewhere in between Pinterest and biotech, startups are using the cloud to make enterprise software available as a service and disrupt the business models of the very companies that helped build Silicon Valley,” Harris writes.

Even though social media companies may dominate the startup landscape, they’re part of a fundamental change in the way people communicate with each other thanks to cloud-based computing resources and the ubiquity of powerful mobile devices.

GigaOM plans to talk more on this subject at the upcoming Structure conference in San Francisco.

President Wants Government Agencies to Focus on Mobile Apps

President Barack Obama has ordered all government agencies to offer more of their services in the form of mobile apps, according to Mashable.

A new memo called “Digital Government: Building a 21st Century Platform to Better Serve the American People” requires each agency to make at least two services, used by the public, available on mobile devices within 12 months.

“For far too long, the American people have been forced to navigate a labyrinth of information across different government programs in order to find the services they need,” says the memo.

“Americans deserve a government that works for them anytime, anywhere, and on any device,” Obama said in a statement.

Mobile App Bump Can Now Push Photos to Your Desktop

Bump Technologies launched a new website feature, allowing Bump’s mobile app users the ability to share smartphone photos to their computers by physically bumping the phone against the PC keyboard, according to AllThingsD.

The photos are hosted online, and users can choose to download the images to their hard drive or share them using a short URL. Previously, Bump’s mobile app allowed for sharing photos and contact information between mobile phones, but not directly to a computer. Find out more about it here.

 

 

Cloud Roundup and Links of Interest – May 14

The cloud helps during natural disastersHow Cloud Computing Helps Weather Dangerous Events

For emergency management, the biggest advantages of cloud computing come down to three words: virtual mission continuity. Cloud computing reduces concerns about whether the data center will survive a disaster, according to an article in the publication Emergency Management.

Businesses and agencies regularlycopy and back up data, but the real challenge is restoring the applications to keep essential services and critical functions online after a disaster. Entire servers, including systems, applications and data can be copied, backed up and be ready to activate in another data center in a matter of minutes.

“The cloud is going to change the whole mentality of emergency management,” said Pascal Shuback, a program coordinator for the King County, Wash., Office of Emergency Management.

“Responders can be anyone with connectivity, the public included. We can regionalize our capabilities and create virtual operation support teams composed of the people able to support an event, and it doesn’t matter where they are.”

Robot Cars Pass Driving Test

Autonomous cars have been granted permission to use public roads in Nevada.

After officials from the Nevada Department of Motor Vehicles rode in the vehicles, dubbed “Google cars,” along freeways, state highways and neighborhoods, as well as the busy Las Vegas Strip, they were given the state’s stamp of approval.

The cars are controlled by computers processing a combination of mapping data, radar, laser sensors and video feeds.

Google is one off several firms racing to develop cars able to drive themselves. It is competing with car manufacturers as well as military firms to develop the technology.

It’s an interesting concept, but let’s hope these Google cars won’t exhibit signs of Droid rage while stuck in heavy traffic.

Apple Looks to Claim iPhone 5 Domain

Apple has filed a claim with the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) for the domain name iphone5.com.

So far, Apple’s smartphone line has counted up only to the iPhone 4S, but the company is widely believed to be getting ready to bring an iPhone 5 into the world.

While there are no device specifications to be gleaned here, the WIPO filing does at least suggest that Apple is considering the iPhone 5 name for the next iteration of its immensely successful product. Or perhaps it just wishes to take that domain out of play, regardless of what it calls the device.

 

 

Cloud Roundup and Links – April 16

Is Cloud Computing a Green Giant?

Many companies have already found that cloud computing can cut their IT costs. A new report found that cloud computing has another benefit to bottom lines: reducing energy costs.

As reported on Greenbiz.com, CDW’s fourth annual Energy Efficient IT Report calls cloud computing a possible “game changer” that’s playing a growing role in energy efficiency.

For the report, CDW surveyed 760 people working in private businesses, nonprofits, schools and governments. Of these respondents, 62 percent agreed that cloud computing is an energy-efficient way to consolidate data centers.

Workers’ Tunes Sucking Up Bandwidth at Work

When Procter & Gamble shut down some access to the Internet, it wasn’t to keep employees from playing around on Facebook or crafting personal emails on company time.

Instead, it was to get them to quit sucking up the company’s Web bandwidth by listening to music and watching movies.

The company told its 129,000 employees they can no longer use music-streaming site Pandora or movie site Netflix at work.

“We are one of the more lenient companies in terms of providing access to the Internet, but there are some sites which don’t serve a specific business purpose — in this case, Netflix and Pandora,” spokesman Paul Fox said in an email, according to CNN.com. “They are both great sites, but if you want to download movies or music, do it on your own time.”

There’s a Tax for That

Responding to Vermont’s business sector uproar against a tax on cloud computing, the state legislature’s Ways and Means Committee approved a bill that would take the extraordinary step of refunding $1.9 million in sales tax revenue.

According to the bill, cloud computing is defined as the use of “pre-written software run in underlying infrastructure that is not managed or controlled by the consumer or a related company.”

Vermont already taxes the sale of pre-written software when its purchased at a store or downloaded from the Internet. And the tax department contends that cloud computing is also taxable.

 

 

Cloud Computing and Links – March 26

‘Personal Cloud’ to Replace PC by 2014, Says Gartner

The cloud has certainly grabbed the attention of both big business and the typical consumer, but the technology’s impact may signal the end of the PC as we know it. Research firm Gartner believes the personal cloud will replace the PC as the center of our digital lives sooner than you might think: 2014.

“Major trends in client computing have shifted the market away from a focus on personal computers to a broader device perspective that includes smartphones, tablets and other consumer devices,” Steve Kleynhans, research vice president at Gartner, said in a statement. “Emerging cloud services will become the glue that connects the Web of devices that users choose to access during the different aspects of their daily life.”

Mike Barton, of Wired’s Cloudline blog, delves into the subject here. Barton draws former Microsoft chief software architect Ray Ozzie into the discussion.

“People argue about, ‘Are we in a post-PC world?’ Why are we arguing? Of course we are in a post-PC world,” Ozzie said at a recent GeekWire-sponsored conference. “That doesn’t mean the PC dies; that just means that the scenarios that we use them in, we stop referring to them as PCs, we refer to them as other things.”

And You Thought Your Utility Bills Were High

How many servers does it take to power Amazon’s huge cloud computing operation? Like most large Internet
companies, Amazon doesn’t disclose such details. But a researcher estimates that Amazon Web Services is using at least 454,400 servers in seven data center hubs around the globe, according to a post at Data Center Knowledge.

Huan Liu, a research manager at Accenture Technology Labs, analyzed Amazon’s EC2 compute service using internal and external IP addresses, which he extrapolated to come up with estimates for the number of racks in each data center location. Liu then applied an assumption of 64 blade servers per rack – four 10U chassis, each holding eight blades – to arrive at the estimate.

Liu’s estimate is bound to generate some debate. But it provides an additional point of reference for Amazon’s scale, along with earlier analyses. It clearly places the size of Amazon’s structure well above the hosting providers that have publicly disclosed their server counts, but still well below the estimated 900,000 servers in Google’s data center network.

Cloud Hunts for the Origins of the Universe

When your day job is figuring out the workings of the universe you need some heavy duty computing power at your disposal.

That’s why researchers at CERN, the Swiss research lab that is home to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) particle accelerator, are dialing up additional muscle from the cloud, according to ZDNet.

CERN is taking part in the Helix Nebula initiative, a pilot project designed to kick start the European cloud computing industry by carrying out scientific research in the cloud.

“On the CERN site we can’t increase the size of our data center much more. Two or three years down the line we’re going to be limited by space and by electrical consumption. We have to think of what other options are open to us and the on-demand, elastic cloud computing provided by a number of these companies seems like a very good option for us to explore,” said Bob Jones, CERN’s head of openlab, the public-private partnership that helps CERN identify new IT that could benefit the lab.

CERN’s mission is to answer fundamental questions such as “What is the origin of mass?” Heavy stuff.

 

 

Cloud Roundup: Cloud Computing Expected to Produce 14 Million Jobs

Analyst firm IDC released a study March 5 revealing that spending on cloud services will produce nearly 14 million jobs worldwide by 2015. IDC, however, said the numbers are the result of adoption in the private sector rather than in government. The U.S. government’s slow adoption, even as agencies are encouraged to consider cloud computing first for all new IT investments, is largely due to security concerns, according to Washington Business Journal. The report reiterated what many have already predicted: The federal government will seek out private IT cloud services, which bring enhanced security by not commingling data with other customers, and reserve the more open public clouds for less risky applications such as email, Web portal development and collaboration.

Workers: Give Us the Cloud

A report released by Gartner March 5 claims workers will circumvent traditional systems to access cloud services if their employers don’t provide these services. Many companies are using a hybrid model for their IT, with some applications remaining in-house while placing others in the cloud. The ease-of-use and functionality available in some of the newer cloud versions of traditional solutions, however, is enticing for many employees, according to CloudPro. “IT organizations that do not match the request for IT as a service run the risk of internal customers bypassing the IT organization and consuming IT services from the external cloud, thereby placing the company at greater risk,” said Chris Howard, managing vice president at Gartner.

Cloud Computing’s Impact on India

As companies continue to adopt cloud-computing practices, more than 2 million jobs are expected to be created in India by 2015 because of this, according to an IDC study commissioned by Microsoft. “A common misperception is cloud computing is a job eliminator, but in truth it will be a job creator, a major one,” Chief Research Officer and Senior Vice President John F Gantz of IDC said.

Job growth will occur across continents and throughout organizations of all sizes because emerging markets, small cities and small businesses have the same access to cloud benefits as large enterprises or developed nations, Gantz added, according to NDTV.com.

A Clouded Terminology

InfoWorld’s David Linthicum sounds off on what, exactly, cloud computing is and how the term is often misused and over-hyped in a recent blog post.

Linthicum says cloud computing is “so widely defined, and thus so vague, that providing a crisp definition is nearly impossible. More disturbing, there seems to be an increasing overuse of cloud computing concepts as saviors for all past IT mistakes.”

He says “the concept of cloud computing is about the ability for organizations to stop solving all IT problems by themselves. It’s certainly about sharing resources, such as storage and compute services, but it really should be more about sharing solutions and pushing risk out of the business.”