Tag Archives: cloud tools

Cloud-Based Jive Helps Businesses Run Better

Jive SoftwareWith emails in one place, documents in another, business cards stuffed into a Rolodex and texts from co-workers dinging into phones, workers spend a lot of time searching for and sorting out communications. Jive Software‘s social business platform has been helping workplaces cut through the clutter and more easily collaborate for some time, but, now that the service is offered through the cloud, it’s getting even better.

Though early releases of the cloud version of Jive were missing some features, InformationWeek reports that the increased functionality and convenience of the cloud version has large clients such as Nuance Communications and Thomson Reuters making or planning to make the switch.

With 60,000 Jive users, Thomson Reuters’ planned switch to the cloud-based version of the service is no small endorsement. Thomson Reuters claims 100% employee participation with the software, and considers Jive’s “The Hub” feature so comprehensive that the company was able to shut down 14 other intranet collaboration systems it had been using (including portals and wikis) because Jive had made them redundant.

Thomson Reuters is particularly excited to gain access to the cloud-based Jive’s new social directory feature, “because allowing employees to find other employees and locate specific expertise within the company is one of the major uses of the social platform,” reports InformationWeek.

Collaboration has always been at the heart of Jive, but as Macmillan Science and Education recently learned, going through the cloud has made it easier to collaborate.

The publisher tried out the cloud-based Jive to help connect 450 employees. The pilot was so successful that the company phased it in more quickly than expected.

“The advantage of it being in the cloud is that bringing users on was just a question of literally telling them what the URL was,” Stephen Devlin, CTO of Macmillan Science and Education, told CBR Online.

Immediate integration of new features is often a benefit of cloud-based software, and Jive is no exception. The company recently announced it will be releasing two betas with its next update–Jive + Producteev integration and Real Time Communication, Both of these features will be available only to cloud customers.

Cloud users will also be the benefactors of new collaborations, such as that between Jive and Okta Cloud Connect, which ZDNet reports will allow Jive customers to connect with Microsoft Active Directory and other corporate LDAP directories.

With better directory services, increased collaboration and access to new features, the cloud-based Jive platform is upping the efficiency and productivity ante for business.

 

MozyPro Online Backup for Business

 

Accountants Move to the Cloud: The New Face of Small-Biz Finances

Accountants Move to the CloudOne of the world’s oldest professions is moving to the cloud. No, not that oldest profession; we’re talking about accounting here!

The forecast is this: if the new wave of cloud-based accountants have their way, soon will be gone the days of small-business owners hauling dollies of documents into an old-school brick-and-mortar office.

In fact, in a new study from Xero, one online accounting software provider for accountants and small businesses, 3 in 10 accounting professionals plan to move their clients online this year alone. Xero definitely has an iron in that fire, but the accountants presumably answer as they will.

Let’s take a look at the phenomenon, where it’s at right now, and the future of the idea.

Cloud Accounting: What It Means for Your Business

Accounting in the cloud is changing the pace and immediacy of how a company’s financials are tracked and accessed. Cloud computing not only reduces the amount of physical hardware a small business needs, it also makes key information easier to use.

“You can get a CPA who has access to your accounting data 24/7,” said Nicholas Bird, a partner and accountant at Lucid Books of Utah — he also advises Xero on its accounting front.

Bird is already using the cloud to accelerate his clients’ understanding of their money.

“You can have a phone conversation about money, in realtime, that most small business won’t have right now because it’s a big hassle,” he said.

The labor-intensive spreadsheet crunching of pre-cloud tools may soon be history. Bird pointed out several other benefits, too.

— Time Saving: No more end-of-tax-year aggregation and computation. Keep your cloud-based accountant up to date constantly. No more crunch-time, come March and April.

— Cost Saving: Your accountant’s cloud-enabled process eliminates a lot of the clerical work associated with physically moving data from your world to theirs. Never again will they need to take your business’s copy of QuickBooks with them to do the work!

— Efficiency: “I can spend 90 percent of my time doing work,” said Bird. “As opposed to spending all my time on logistics and saying things like: ‘Hey, you didn’t send a file or a password.’”

Getting Started: Cloud Accounting Apps

There are numerous ways to move your small-business accounting to the cloud. You might choose Wave Accounting, or Kashoo. The options are multiple.

One development that’s ongoing, said Bird, is that cloud-based app providers are seeing the advantages of sewing together whole packages of small-business oriented services.

For example, in May 2012, Xero acquired WorkFlowMax — a complete suite of business-management tools that the company can now incorporate into its extant accounting packages.

“Right now, it’s still somewhat small but it’s only going to get bigger,” Bird said of cloud accounting. “It’s kind of still about building up the ecosystems. It’s going to continue to get better because different companies are integrating these systems together. That’s where I see it going.”

 

 

How the Cloud Reduced Our Newlywed Stress

Cloud Storage for PhotosDespite having been through it all once before, I made the rookie bridegroom mistake of thinking that once the wedding was done, all of the stresses involved in that specific day in our lives would be over. After all, the wedding had gone off without a hitch, everyone involved had a good time, we had a great destination event with family and friends, and being in our 50’s, I thought we had all of the bases covered. After all, this was the second time around for both of us.

I was wrong.

Despite a pretty high level of technical awareness, my years of focusing on business technology, from basic hardware through designing data centers had ill prepared me for the changes that had happened in a small corner of the  consumer technology world; the wedding photographs.

The first time I got married, sometime back in the 20th century, the wedding photo book process went like this: The photographer sent you proofs, you picked out the photos that you liked, the photographer delivered a wedding book made up of those prints. You complained about some part of it, then went on with your life.

It doesn’t seem to work like that anymore.

We received 7 gigabytes worth of pictures on CD; this might seem like a good thing (it did to my wife) but to me it meant that there were close to a thousand images that had to be sorted through. And as a fairly decent amateur photographer, it meant that I could look at an image and see how just the right post processing might make it a better picture.

So much for the simple yes/no judgment for each of those images.

To make it worse, my wife really wanted to be able to create lots of different photo books, with the intent to eventually print them. A book for her parents, a book for mine, one for her bridesmaids, one for my only sibling (we had taken lots of pictures the day before the wedding itself).  And while she was more than willing to start sorting images, it was up to me to do the post processing. And get her the two or three hundred images that she had narrowed her selection down to for all those different photo books.

Traveling photos

To make my life just a little more complex, my wife’s job requires that she travel a fair amount. And when she traveled for business she often met up with old friends and wanted to show them the wedding pictures. This meant that before she left on each trip she would ask me to put a selection of the pictures on her tablet. Of course, I never seemed to have the pictures she wanted available to be copied to her tablet, with the post processing of the images being relatively low priority in the crush of events that define our lives.

Fortunately for our marriage, the cloud actually came to the rescue. Using a cloud backup service with a client for her tablet, I was able to create some working directories that replicated to the cloud from my desktop, and she was able to pull images that she wanted to show off down to her tablet whenever she wanted them, eventually deciding on a core set of images that she stored locally, and others that she downloaded to show specific people. Most importantly, from the husband perspective, was that it took me out of the loop. She had all of her images available, without using up a large percentage of her local storage, she could see what images were in the pre-or post-processing stage, and with a simple email to me, while she traveled, she could ask to have a specific image edited to her liking, often so she could have it printed out for a family member she was seeing in her travels.

It’s been six months and she’s still trying to decide which images get printed for who, but with the cloud making all of the pictures available to her wherever she happens to be, my honey-do list has gotten significantly shorter.