Tag Archives: mozy cloud backup

Mozy’s Dave Robinson Honored As Rising Executive

Dave Robinson, MozyDave Robinson, Mozy’s VP of Global Marketing, has been honored as one of the 40 Under 40 by Utah Business Magazine. This award honors the top 40 executives under the age of 40 in the state of Utah. More information (and voting for the magazine cover) can be found at 40 Under 40 on Facebook.

Dave was hired in 2006 as Mozy’s first marketing employee. Over the past seven years, Dave has grown Mozy’s marketing operations, which now spread across North America, Europe and China. Dave’s team is responsible for marketing MozyHome, MozyPro, MozyEnterprise, and Mozy’s newest feature, Mozy Stash.

Prior to Mozy, Robinson worked for several other Utah companies, including the Publicis agency in Salt Lake City, Webmiles, and Ancestry.com, helping grow its email marketing business significantly over a three-year period.

Mozy is grateful to have such a marketing expert leading the charge to spread the Mozy awesomeness. Dave’s leadership and experience are critical in a fast growing technology industry like online backup. Thanks, Dave!

If you’d like to see Dave on the cover of Utah Business Magazine, you can vote for him here! Voting runs from now through January 22, and you can vote once daily.

The Cloud in Times of Trouble: How It Works for Small Biz When Disaster Strikes

The understatement of late 2012, when it comes to technology: systems suffer when the environment is extreme.

The Cloud in Times of TroubleWe saw this, of course, in late October, as New York, New Jersey, and parts of the East Coast lost power, public transportation — and lives — during the onslaught of Hurricane Sandy.

The human toll being the most critical at such times, it can take a while for the challenges of running a small business to return to their normal focus. But later, when the sky has cleared and life must resume something of its normal routine, challenges do loom. For small-business owners, this means bringing their data infrastructure back online.

Payrolls. Repairs. Contact lists of vendors and customers — for all kinds of reasons these become more critical than ever. Has your IT core been protected? Have you lost the data that everyone relies upon to get back to bringing in a paycheck?

Let’s look at the cloud, and the role that professionals working with it daily see it playing during not only Sandy, but also future crisis events.

Data First Responders and the Cloud

“During disasters, IT teams become first responders tasked with trying to keep the business operational,” says Todd Krautkremer, vice president of marketing at cloud-network company Pertino.

Krautkremer blogged about the role of the cloud in the days after Sandy: “They often have to deal with a wide range of issues, including keeping back-up power running, physically relocating servers, and grappling with an entire workforce that suddenly needs secure remote access.”

So, hats off to the IT crews out there. But one way to avoid having to count on too few pros being in demand by too many hurting businesses during a post-disaster demand peak: the cloud.

Ensuring that your small business’s data is protected means making your data non-reliant upon geography. Think about it: if it’s not physically stored in the path of harm, restarting your business after an emergency requires only finding power and a working computer — not scrambling to find your data.

And that’s not as bad as facing the prospect of waterlogged hard drives and a wrecked set of servers. Even if you feel more comfortable storing your most-sensitive business information in-house, having a series of cloud servers to which you can migrate that material in stages as a crisis approaches, this is key to securing it from the elements.

Scaling Up, Scaling Down: Small Biz to the Federal Gov’t

The cloud’s role in disaster response and recovery is something businesses of all sizes acknowledge.

The General Services Administration saw the value of the cloud early on, says Casey Coleman, chief information officer for the federal department. As an early adopter, the GSA was able to provide access to its servers and help with emergency response and recovery during and after Sandy’s arrival in the U.S.

“GSA’s cloud conversion prevented complications from the Verizon outage, which would have led to interruptions in these services for GSA users in New York and New Jersey,” Coleman told FCW, a publication that covers the business of federal tech.

It is a problem not likely to vanish from small-business and other operators’ list of concerns. The changes that are now becoming  best practices, Krautkremer  blogged,  are changes based in the cloud.

“One thing is for sure,” he wrote. “The sky will open-up and wreak havoc again in the future. The next time it does, SMB IT organizations can look to the cloud.”

 

MozyPro Online Backup

 

Life in the Cloud

Be sure to enter to win a 1-year free MozyHome account by leaving a comment on this post, telling us how you use the cloud!

These days data is always available to us, never no more than a click or a tap away. Cloud computing is quickly becoming a mainstream part of everyday life, and we find ourselves banking, updating Facebook from our phones, sending emails from taxis, and backing up our data — all because of “the cloud”.

We’ve talked about this all-knowing cloud before, reviewing how to make your important information available to you online, how you can use cloud backup to customize your Android phone, how the cloud is helping accountants, and even how the cloud is relaxing concerns about when employees are arriving or leaving the office.

So, what is cloud computing? Let’s take a look.

Life in the Cloud

(This image was grabbed from our “Life in the Cloud” infographic)

There are quite a few cloud computing companies that play a major role in our every day lives, including Google, Facebook, Pandora, Netflix, and Twitter. Each of these companies stores a variety of different information in the cloud, including some information about you.

Where do these companies store all of this information?

Cloud computing companies store users’ information in giant storage centers called “Data Centers“. Data centers contain row after row of servers filled with hard drives with your data on them.

Data Centers

(This image was grabbed from our “Where Oh Where is the World’s Data Being Stored?” infographic)

These data centers are secured with various types of security (both physical and technological), to ensure that your information can’t be access by someone coming into the data center, either in person or via the web.

Because your information is stored in the data center, you can access it using any device that has the ability to connect to it (your laptop, your iPad, or your Mom’s typewriter. Ok, just kidding on the last one.)

I want to get in the cloud!

So, have you decided it’s definitely time to upgrade and enter the cloud?

If you’re still holding out and you need more convincing, here’s a recent post on 5 more signs that it’s time to upgrade and enter the cloud (and yes mixtapes do make the list).

If you’re ready to join the digital age, want to help you on this exciting journey. Trusting your family pictures and your tax documents to a someone you don’t know well can be an unnerving experience. We’ve put together some guides to help you make sure you’re considering all the factors when choosing a cloud backup vendor.

After reviewing these posts, you’ll feel much more confident in evaluating and choosing someone to trust with your important data.

Mozy has made it very easy to access your files (whether backed up OR synced) via your computer, your mobile device, or a web browser on a friend’s computer. Currently backing up over 90 petabytes (What’s a petabyte?) of data for over 3,000,000 home users and 80,000 business, Mozy is the leader in cloud backup and storage. We’re big fans of the cloud and the amazing things it lets us do. We’ve put together this guide to help you learn more about cloud computing and what it can do for you. We promise that once you’ve tried it, you’ll never go back. We hope you’ll consider the online backup leader for all your cloud storage needs.

Enter to win a 1-year free MozyHome account by leaving a comment on this post, telling us how you use the cloud! (Comments must be submitted by 9/28/12, winner will be emailed.)

5 Things to Ask Your Cloud Backup Services Provider

Online backup is a booming industry, with dozens of vendors providing storage in the cloud. The idea is a compelling one: for a few dollars a year, you have immediate and automatic offsite storage of your most critical files. No messing with tapes, making DVDs, or worrying if you have the most current files backed up. But how to get started with finding the right service for you? Here are five questions to ask your potential provider.

1. What does it cost for my backups?

The first thing you need to do is figure out what you want to backup and how much data you are talking about. Are you just interesting in saving critical files, such as photographs and documents? Or do you want a backup of the entire PC itself, including program files and the operating system? Now, think about how much data you had on your computers a year ago, and how fast your storage needs are growing. You want to make sure that you anticipate this growth, too. If you are storing lots of photographs, audio or video files, this is very important because these are all big files compared to ordinary documents.

Once you know how much data you are dealing with, you can calculate what your monthly backup costs will be. Some providers offer discounts on annual service contracts too. Some providers offer unlimited space for a fixed fee too.

2. Can I backup more than one computer on a single account?

Some services assume that each account will be setup with a single computer, while others offer the ability to backup an entire collection of PCs. While you are checking this out, also look to see if they support the specific operating system versions of your entire computer collection. Some services don’t support 64-bit Windows, or Windows Server versions, or Macs for example.

3. Does your service save previous file versions?

Many products have the ability to save multiple versions of each file, up to a pre-set maximum that you can specify. This means you can go back in time if you have made a mistake in your work, or saved something that you would have rather not have done. If this is important to you, then consider which services have this feature. Note that some providers will include the space occupied by multiple file versions in their storage quotas.

4. How does my first backup get saved?

The first backup that you make can take several hours or days, depending on how much data you are sending to the cloud and how fast your Internet connection is. But once that chore is done, your incremental backups shouldn’t take too long, and happen in the background anyway. Some vendors, such as Mozy with its Data Shuttle, provide for this by having you mail them (via the postal mail) an actual external hard drive so the initial backup “seed,” as it is called, can be stored quickly. Other vendors have software that create backups locally and allow you to move the backup to another location across the Internet.

5. What kind of support do you offer?

Most service providers offer email-based support but not much beyond that. That is great if you don’t have many problems or are fairly confident and comfortable with using the service. But if something goes wrong, you want to talk to a live person. Some services only have live support during their business hours. If you want 24/7 support, then consider vendors such as Mozy, who offer the service.

 

 

Why the Cloud Resonates With Consumers

Cloud ComputingMany services and technologies have come and gone over the last few decades. Some stick. Others have to pack it in for numerous reasons. Right now, it seems cloud computing is on an upward trajectory and shows no evidence of letting up. While the technology enabling the cloud is what drives its success, many factors have to go just right for a service to experience this type of buzz.So far, cloud computing has hit the right notes and is enjoying its moment in the spotlight. Here are just a few reasons why the cloud has consumer appeal.

The Name

What sounds more appealing? Software as a service (Saas), utility computing, infrastructure as a service (IaaS) or the cloud? Referring to this technology simply as “the cloud” took it from the depths of some server rack in the back of an IT department and placed it front-and-center for both consumers and IT staff. “The cloud” is more accessible and more colorful than “utility computing.” Without the moniker, who knows if cloud computing would have been given the chance to reach its potential.

And who, you ask, coined the phrase “cloud computing?” That depends on where you direct the question. There are references to the cloud going back to 1997 when a trademark application for the term cropped up (the trademark attempt was later abandoned). It was a term mentioned in The New York Times in 2001, described as a “cloud of computers.”

In August 2006, Google’s Eric Schmidt described its approach to SaaS as cloud computing. It seems this was the first mainstream use of the term as its currently understood.

According to author John M. Willis, “I think this was the first high profile usage of the term, where not just ‘cloud’ but ‘cloud computing’ was used to refer to SaaS, and since it was in the context of Google, the term picked up the PaaS/IaaS connotations associated with the Google way of managing data centers and infrastructure.

“Much like ‘Web 2.0,’ cloud computing was a collection of related concepts that people recognized, but didn’t really have a good descriptor for, a definition in search of a term, you could say. When Schmidt used it in 2006 to describe their own stuff and then Amazon included the word ‘cloud’ in EC2 when it was launched a few weeks later, the term became mainstream.”

The Freedom

A big key to cloud computing adoption is that it has achieved an ease of use that anyone with an email address and credit card can start to see what the fuss is about. Free, limited accounts with simple sign-ups have gotten many people comfortable enough that they’re willing to try out paid, full-service accounts.

And there is a sense of freedom at being able to get stuff done without having to physically be at a work station or in the home office. This ability can be very liberating, especially when you’re on the road and need to access something important. The cloud allows you to go about your life and work in a streamlined manner, and if an emergency arises where you need specific information immediately, the cloud has you covered.

The References

The cloud already has worked its way into pop culture. On FX, a comedy called “The League” features a group of friends who participate in an NFL fantasy football league. “The League” is probably not a show that you’d want to watch with children or grandma because a.) it’s on FX, b.) double entendres galore and c.) common decency. But it’s well-written, topical and, in my opinion, super funny.

One of the characters named Taco, a slacker who’s not quite with it, waxes philosophic on the cloud during a conversation with characters Ruxin and Kevin.

Ruxin: “Are you baked all the time?”

Taco: “Oh, not this baked! I just wish I could walk around in a cloud of it all day long. ‘To the cloud!”

Kevin: “All right… you realize that that’s just a cloud of data pushing itself wirelessly through different devices?”

Taco: [snorts] “Now who sounds baked?”

 

 

How to Select a Cloud Backup and Recovery Vendor

(This article is the first in a three-part series exploring how to evaluate and select a cloud backup and recovery service. Future articles will explore how different data types are treated by backup services and different backup methods. Read Part 2 here, and Part 3 here.)

How to select a cloud backup vendorFor anybody whose computer activities include creating “data,” frequent, reliable backups are as important as, perhaps even more than an Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) or an anti-virus security suite.

This applies to everyone from those using their laptop purely for personal activities to Small Office/Home Office (SOHO) folks like me large enterprise organizations.

And like any purchase, whether you’re looking to buy a new car, big-screen television, smartphone service plan, a hamburger — or an account with a cloud-based backup service — it’s important to do some research and think before you choose.

With a car, for example, you need to know what you want it for — commuting 50 miles each way every day to work? Being a “tornado chaser” in bad weather on bad roads? Transporting half a dozen teen soccer players? A two-seater electric vehicle is good for the first, but not the other two. You get the idea.

For backing up your computer data to a cloud service, the same holds true. Different backup services work differently. In order to select one that one, you need to both know what your backup requirements are, and how backup services work.

Making copies

Backups, of course, mean, “a separate copy of data on your computer, in case something happens to your computer.”

“Data” can include not only Microsoft Office-type documents (word processing, spreadsheets, presentations, databases, email) which business and personal life increasingly rely on, but also address books and contact information, photos and videos you’ve taken with your digital camera, scans you’ve made of important documents. And it can include copies of data from your smartphone(s), tablet(s) and other mobile devices. Plus music, videos, ebooks and other multimedia you may have purchased and downloaded.

“On your computer” may include not only data on its hard drives (including solid-state drives) but possibly also on external hard drives, and removable media. And data uploaded from your smartphone, etc.

Safekeeping

Having a backup means that if you accidentally delete a file, or if your computer is damaged, lost or stolen, you still have to replace the hardware, but at least you can recreate your files, documents, spreadsheets, presentations, contact information, photos, scanned documents… all the information that your personal and/or business life relies on.

“Local” backups, typically done to an external hard drive or even to a USB flash drive, are affordable and increasingly easy to do. But they can require daily attention — remembering where they are, to plug them in, turn on the application. And because they’re local, which typically means right next to each other in the same room, the odds are good that the same incident — electrical surge, theft, fire, flood, tornado, meteor strike — may also wipe away your backup, leaving you with no copies of your data.

Plus, “local” backups can be harder to do if you’ve got a notebook and are travelling away from your home or office.

To the cloud

Online backup, saving copies of your files to a service in the cloud, avoids the problems of local backups. Backing up to the cloud does, of course, require your computer to be connected to the Internet, but the odds of this are high. (For example, otherwise you couldn’t read this article.)

Cloud backup services — like local backup products — come in a range of approaches, with a corresponding range of prices, features and options. Selecting one isn’t “which one is best?” (Although some will be better than others.) Of course you want one that’s good. But it’s also a matter of determining which one best matches what you need in a backup.

So you shouldn’t pick a cloud backup service without first identifying what you want to back up, and how different cloud services do backups — so you can pick a cloud backup service that matches your goals.