Tag Archives: tech support

Keeping Things Cool

Regardless of an organization’s headcount or revenue, there is no denying that cloud backup is required by today’s businesses. It’s convenient (well, it should be). It’s cost-effective (well, it should be). And it’s scalable (well, it should be). If you want to protect your data, then you need to back up your data. What may not be as obvious is the cloud backup service that’s best for your particular business.

No one needs to tell you that there are many cloud backup companies out there. It may sound accurate to state that you have many options to choose from. But in reality, your options are not a numerous as a Google search for cloud backup services may imply. What you’re really after is the cloud backup service that’s best for your organization. When you are tasked with finding the best cloud backup service that’s best for your organization, there are far fewer options to choose from.

No business that creates cloud backup software is perfect in and of itself. We know that, you know that. When it comes down to it, it’s really the manner in which the business backs up what it sells. You can have the best cloud backup service out there, but without the best support for that service, the service may not meet all of your expectations.

Have you ever had a problem with something you purchased that you needed help with to get the product to perform to your specifications and to meet your requirements? Just about any product can perform to specs in a testing environment. That’s easy enough to do under controlled conditions. But in the real world, getting the product to perform the way you want it to perform can sometimes present challenges—even with the best of products. The truth is, the lab and real life can sometimes produce different results.

 

Man in front of a fan

 

I remember purchasing a new home air conditioning unit some years ago. The brand on the AC unit is considered by many to be the best on the market. The company that installed the unit has a service reputation that is second to none. But guess what? The unit malfunctioned two weeks after it was installed. This occurred during one of the hottest summers on record. I had no idea that the inside of a home could hit the mid-90s. One particularly lasting memory of this experience was dumping ice cubes into a 50-gallon aquarium to keep our finned pets alive. No joke, the water was even too warm for our tropical fish. Some kicked the bucket (“Daddy, why is Dori floating upside down?”). Sure, we were disappointed that the AC unit wasn’t pumping out cold air, but we weren’t frustrated. I will tell you why. We called the company, patiently described the problem (“we’re hot as hell”), and kindly explained that we expected the problem to be fixed quickly. We paid good money for a product and service from the best in the business.

A service tech was at our home before we could pour another lemonade. The problem required a bit of troubleshooting, but the unit was repaired that day. Today, I can’t recall the specifics of the problem (it had something to do with our breaker box), but what I still remember very clearly is this: the service tech was friendly, knowledgeable, professional, and spoke to us as if we were important to their business and reputation. More than 20 years later, our AC unit is still keeping us cool.

Here are some important points to consider about Mozy cloud backup:
•    Mozy by EMC is the most trusted name in cloud data protection.
•    Mozy backs up more than 90 petabytes of data worldwide.
•    Should you ever experience an issue or have a question, Mozy provides 24x7x365 U.S.-based support, which gives you access to our pros anytime you need them.
•    Mozy offers additional services, including Professional Services and Managed Services.

It’s no secret that we here at Mozy believe that we offer the very best cloud backup service for your organization—any organization—whether you’re an SMB or a large enterprise. Cloud backup and recovery is what we do, and we believe we do it better than anyone else. Your business is important to us, so we’re here for you. Now that’s pretty cool in this day and age when so many claim to be the best but don’t back it up.

Reminder, basic quick fixes for troubled gear

Reminder, basic quick fixes for troubled gearEven the best of computers and other electronic gear hiccups occasionally. You want to save your electronics, but you don’t want to throw good money after bad with expensive new parts or paid support. Before you junk that old gear, here are some tips for spending ten or twenty minutes addressing the issue before asking yourself the “repair or replace” question.

While there’s a lot that we as end users can’t or shouldn’t do — or even attempt — to fix them, there’s still often a fair number of things we can try, and problem we can fix or otherwise make go away.

This isn’t new to computers. If you’re old enough and have lived in cold climates, you may remember hearing your car fail to start, instead making an odd clicking sound — which, if you were knowledgeable and lucky — could be fixed quickly with a few whacks of a hammer, wrench or other solid object. How? If the problem was that the solenoid (relay switch) on the starter motor had frozen stuck, whacking it often unstuck it. (For dramatic effect when helping a friend, you would tell them to turn the key before you strike.)

With electronics, physical force is rarely the solution. Instead, there’s other things to try — obvious things in theory, but easy to lose track of if you haven’t had to do it to a given device lately.

1.) Check the power, power cord, and power switches.

Is the power cord fully plugged in at both ends? For example, the router in my home office is placed such that it’s easy to unseat the power cord and not notice — which in turn whacks wireless connectivity.

Is the wall outlet on? Some are connected to light switches; it’s easy to forget this. Check by plugging in a radio or light or something.

Are all the power switches on the device on? Many computers, printers, and displays have a power rocker-switch in the back, where it isn’t visible. This includes many computers that have a front-side on switch.

Ditto for any intermediary UPSs, surge protectors or power strips — are they plugged in and powered on? Again, check using a light or radio or some other device.

2.) Check the fuses. (More common with stereo and home theater gear.)

This may involve opening up the chassis — don’t do this if you don’t know how to do it safely! And make sure you use the correct fuse to replace one that you think has blown.

3.) For battery-powered devices, check the battery.

If you have a spare that you know has a charge, try that. If you can recharge the battery, try that.

Also, if you can, take the battery out and look at the battery contacts. If they’ve become corroded (typically from a leaky battery), for example, have green or white powdery gunk on them, clean the contact off (carefully).

4.) Check all the non-power cables.

It’s easy for a cable to have come loose — or be damaged. Unplug and replug them. If everything was previously working, the odds are low that a cable has gone bad, but keep this possibility in mind if other fixes don’t work. And sometimes it’s one of the connectors.

5.) Power device(s) off, wait 30 seconds, and reboot.

This works astonishingly often. As my friend and colleague Michael Dortch said years ago, “If rebooting fixes it, it wasn’t a problem.”

6.) For Windows devices, try booting to SAFE MODE.

Sometimes you need to reboot several times, first two or three times to Safe Mode, and then one or two times to regular mode. From SAFE MODE, you may then want to try rolling back to a previous RESTORE POINT.

Here are some other quick tips that I have found helpful:

  • For devices with a backup battery you can access, check, and if possible and necessary, replace.
  • For devices with a BIOS, boot to the BIOS, and check the configuration.
  • For computers, if it boots but you can’t use it, try a spare keyboard and mouse, if you have any (which you ought to).
  • For WiFi problems, if there’s a physical switch on your device, check that. Either way, also check the settings in the BIOS.
  • Leave the device alone for an hour or two.

And of course, invest the money or effort to have a professional look at it. Often, like with cars, it will work fine when you try to demonstrate the problem to somebody else.

 

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