Virtual servers? We’ve got you covered!

Did you know that there are more virtual servers worldwide than there are physical servers?

“Virtual machines continue to vastly outnumber physical machines,” according to IDC (Report #252841). The authors of the report went on to say that “the gap between the number of virtual machines and physical machines continues to expand and continues to throttle server hardware shipments. Virtualization has changed the way customers interact with and purchase server operating systems.”

If your environment is like most organizations, you probably run your applications on a combination of different types of servers. All of that data needs to be backed up and Mozy can help you do it with minimal administrative overhead.

Mozy can back up common server-specific applications found in 32-bit and 64-bit Windows servers and Mac OS X servers. Mozy also supports Linux distributions CentOS, Debian, Red Hat, and Ubuntu. In addition, Mozy provides backup for your VMware vSphere and Microsoft Hyper-V virtual servers.

Mozy for servers simplifies data protection and is particularly suitable for smaller server workloads such as those at remote and branch offices—where data is oftentimes not adequately protected. Our recent release of backup software for vSphere highlights our ongoing dedication to protecting your server data and expands Mozy’s server portfolio to protect your VMware virtual environment.

Centralized management from vCenter makes it easy to back up your VMs’ critical data from the pane of glass that you are accustomed to. And the replication technology in Mozy backup is superefficient so it doesn’t bog down your network. Mozy leverages VMware Change Block Tracking (CBT), which means that only changes to the machine need to be backed up. That reduces the time and amount of data that needs to be transferred to complete backup jobs to the Mozy cloud. In addition, the Mozy Admin Console lets you centrally manage all of your server backups, whether physical or virtual. And your VM data is always fully encrypted before it’s transmitted, during transmission, and while at rest in the Mozy cloud.

Mozy features include:

•   Centralized management from vCenter for all VMs: backups, restores, and backup management
•   Efficient backups: block-level change tracking for minimal data transmission to cloud
•   Compression of the data before transmission to the cloud
•   Encrypted transmission of data to the cloud and at rest: corporate key support
•   Full restoration of a VM to a new computer or the same computer
•   Backup history that lets you restore the most current backup or an earlier backup
•   Efficient rollback restore of VM: only differences are download from cloud
•   Scheduled or on-demand backups
•   Control over network bandwidth usage: bandwidth throttling
•   File Level Recovery of files from VM
•   Data Shuttle for fast seeding of data to cloud
•   Media restore for restore of many VMs from the cloud: smoking crater scenario

Want a set-and-forget automatic backup solution that you don’t have to constantly monitor? With Mozy you can schedule your backups to run daily, weekly, or monthly, or automatically throughout the day, as frequently as every two hours for automatic backup. Need to maximize your budget for backup? Mozy requires no capital expenditure for hardware, very little up-front cost, and has minimal administrative overhead.

You might be asking yourself, “Sounds good, but how much is all of this going to cost me?” There is no separate charge for vSphere backup software within Mozy. So if you’ve already purchased the server add-on package with MozyPro or MozyEnterprise, then you’re covered and your vSphere backups will be treated the same as your Windows or Linux server backups. Based on your existing Mozy service, you are charged only for the amount of front-end storage you’ve purchased. When you need more storage, you buy more. It’s that easy.

Mozy cloud backup: a cost-effective way to protect your servers—virtual or otherwise.

As a Mozy customer, you can download Mozy’s backup software for vSphere via the Mozy Admin Console. Beginning May 21, you can download the software by visiting the Mozy product download page.

Preparing your business for the next man-made disaster

Our friends at Boston University put together this infographic on man-made disasters—which includes theft, fraud and corruption—and the effects they have on businesses. One way to thwart insider fraud is to be sure that your business performs a risk assessment at least annually or more frequently. One aspect of the risk assessment should be whether or not your crucial business files are protected and can be recovered in the event of a man-made disaster. By backing up with Mozy you are ensuring that your files are encrypted locally during the initial backup process. Your encrypted files are sent through a secure SSL connection. Mozy then protects your data in Mozy’s world-class data centers, which have successfully completed the SSAE 16 Type 2 audit and are ISO 27001 certified. You’ve gotta ask yourself one question: Are your business files ready for a man-made disaster? Feeling lucky isn’t going to cut it.

This week in tech history – April 26th – May 2nd

April 26, 1970 World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) is formally created with the goal to promote creative intellectual activity and for facilitating the transfer of technology.

April 27, 1965 Disposable diapers “Pampers” are patented by R.C. Duncan, bringing joy to anyone who had to clean a soiled cloth diaper.

April 28, 1932 Vaccine for a viral disease that wiped out 9% of the U.S. population in 1793 is released. The disease is Yellow Fever.

April 29, 1953 The first experimental 3D TV broadcast is shown on a Los Angeles station.

April 30, 1993 CERN (the European Organization for Nuclear Research) announces that the World Wide Web will be free to anyone, starting the .com boom.

May 1, 1981 Radio Shack releases TRS-DOS 1.3, which replaces cassette tapes with disk files with a capacity of an astounding 89 kilobytes each.

Mzy 2, 2000 GPS, once authorized for military use only, is made available to everyone by authorization of U.S. President Bill Clinton.

Want to see more?  Check out our tech history infographic

References

http://www.on-this-day.com/onthisday/thedays/alldays/apr28.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yellow_fever

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CERN

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TRS-DOS

http://www.spacedaily.com/news/gps-00d.html

This week in history – April 12 – 18

Week 3 of our “This Week in tech History” covers new animals and allows us to see better.  See what happened in tech history between April 12 – 18

April 12, 1988 First patent for a new animal life form is issued for a genetically altered mouse. (like we need more species of mice)

April 13, 1743  Thomas Jefferson the third president of the United States and the inventor of  the pedometer, polygraph and the spherical sundial, is born.

April 14, 1956 Mark IV, the first videotape, is demonstrated.  The Mark IV replayed William Lodge’s speech moments after he finished astonishing the crowd.

April 15, 1924 Rand McNally publishes its first road atlas, a precursor to the modern-day GPS.

April 16, 1867 Wilbur Wright of the Wright brother’s fame is born near Millville, Indiana.

April 17, 1790 Benjamin Franklin, the inventor of bifocals and the lightning rod, passes away in his home in Philadelphia.

April 18, 1986 IBM becomes the first computer manufacturer to use a megabit chip, leveling the playing field between American computer makers and the Japanese electronics industry.

Want to see more?  Check out our tech history infographic

References:

http://www.historyorb.com/day/april/15

http://www.computerhistory.org/tdih/April/18/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benjamin_Franklin#Death_and_legacy

http://www.biography.com/people/wilbur-wright-20672839#synopsis

My name is “Woody” and I work for Mozy

Steve, aka “Woody,” is a friend to all here at Mozy. Woody is a sales engineer and is based out of our London office. Because of his charisma, Mozy is proud to send him to all the corners of the earth to work with our partners in their journey to the cloud and cloud services. Here is a Q&A with Woody.

I define my workspace as…

Wherever I lay my laptop bag. Planes, trains and automobiles; otherwise, never more than 2 meters (6.5 feet) from a power socket.

A device I can’t live without….

A TV set with a sleep timer.

When I arrive at work, I typically start my day off by…

Downing a glass of cold milk and having a conversation about the weather (it’s usually more interesting than politics, less controversial than religion, and less fractious than sports).

How long have you worked for Mozy?

A little over six years.

I do/do not listen to music at work and it helps me work better because …

When I can and only if I’m not speaking with a customer. Anything with a fast tempo as it keeps me focused on the task at hand and prevents me from eavesdropping on interesting conversations.

If you could be in one TV sitcom or movie, what would it be and why?

I’d be a guest at “Fawlty Towers” (think Major Gowen), or I’d be Lord Flashheart in “Blackadder”!

Outside of work, I am passionate about …

Rugby, snow sports, and the beach.

My eating habits are …

Completely random. I like to make letters out of pretzels and spell funny words like “Wankel Rotary Engine.”

If I could be someone for a day, I would be …

Richard “Dickie” Branson

The “secret sauce” that makes me who I am …

If you can’t be passionate about what you do, then do something else.

One thing that makes me unique is….

Each of us is unique; no one thing defines us.

Guilty pleasure…

Using the hotel laundry service and not having to make the bed in the morning.

This week in tech history (April 5 – April 11)

See what happened in tech history on our second week of “This Week in Tech History”

April 5, 1964 - First driverless trains run on London Underground.

April 6, 1980 Post-it Notes are introduced.

April 7,  1896 Tolbert Lanston is issued a patent for the Monotype printing press.

April 9,1919 - John Presper Eckert, co-inventor of the first electronic computer-(ENIAC), is born.

April 10, 1930 - Synthetic rubber is first produced.

April 11, 1893 Frederic Ives patents the process for half-tone printing press.

Want to see more?  Check out our tech history infographic

References:

http://www.historyorb.com/day/april/5

http://inventors.about.com/od/todayinhistory/a/april.htm

http://www.historyorb.com/day/april/9

http://senselist.com/2006/10/27/12-things-thomas-jefferson-invented/

http://www.historyorb.com/day/april/10

http://inventors.about.com/od/todayinhistory/a/april.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quadruplex_videotape

The Most Influential Tech Inventions and Discoveries from Each Month of the Year

 

Take a stroll down memory lane and discover when each of these ground-breaking, tech-related innovations and discoveries became a reality.

Months of the Year

  • The first iPhone is unveiled by Steve Jobs on January 9, 2007. “Project Purple” as it was code named throughout production was the first smart phone to fully utilize the touch screen as well as run on a computer operating system.
  • The phonograph is patented  on February 19, 1878. This invention was the first of its kind to be able to record and reproduce sound.
  • The first HDD is patented on March 11, 1970. Because of the hard disk drive, future storage services such as the cloud could become a reality
  • The first lap top is released on April 3, 1981. While it may have only included a single sided, single density 64 KB floppy drive the Osborne 1 revolutionized the possibilities for micro-computers.
  • The first fiber optic is tested by AT&T on May 11, 1977. Without the invention of the low-loss optical fiber our “information superhighway” would not be possible.
  • The first public color TV is demonstrated on June 27, 1929. From that point on and regardless of how large or small the device, the masses expected to view it in color.
  • The Sony Walkman is released in Japan on July 1, 1979. The Walkman TPS-L2 forever changed the way people would listen to music on the go.
  • The World Wide Web debuts on August 6, 1991. After months of strictly professional use Tim Berners-Lee opened up his invention to the public and transformed communication as we know it.
  • Genetic fingerprinting is discovered by Dr. Alec Jeffreys in September 1884.This remains our only unique identifier that cannot be altered or appear exactly as someone else’s.
  • Sputnik, the first human-made satellite to orbit the earth, is launched by Russia on October 4, 1957. This milestone sparked the space race.
  • The first CGI is used in movie “Westworld” on November 21, 1973. The first use of this was done to pixelate photography in order to capture a robot’s point of view.
  • The first home security system is patented on December 2, 1969 by Marie Brown. This gave homes a new level of security never before available to the populous.

This week in Tech history (April 1-April 4)

For the month of April we will be taking a look at a significant events that happened on each day. See what happened this week below.

April 1, 1927 – First automatic record changer introduced by His Master’s Voice.

April 2, 1889 – Charles Martin Hall patents an inexpensive method for the production of aluminum, which brought the metal into wide commercial use.

April 3, 1973 – Martin Cooper, an employee at Motorola, makes the first call using a cell phone.  “Can you hear me now?”

April 4, 1975 – Microsoft is founded by Bill Gates and Paul Allen and would soon revolutionize the computer industry.

 

http://inventors.about.com/od/todayinhistory/a/april.htm

https://www.google.com/search?q=first+call+on+a+cell+phone&oq=first+call+on+a+cell+phone&aqs=chrome..69i57.4326j0j7&sourceid=chrome&es_sm=119&ie=UTF-8

http://hereisthecity.com/en-gb/2012/04/04/11-things-that-happened-this-day-in-history-4th-april/

http://www.historyorb.com/day/april/1

Want more tech history?  Check out our infographic “The Most Influential Tech Inventions and Discoveries from Each Month of the Year.

 

2GB Free MozyHome Online Backup

Our cloud is being raised on fruits, veggies, and whole grains

There are a lot of very old people living in the United States. We’re not talking about men and women who live beyond the average life expectancy of 79.8 years (for males, 77.4 years; for females, 82.2 years), according to the World Health Organization. We’re talking about seemingly super humans who are well beyond a century old.

Just a few weeks ago the U.S. Social Security Administration’s inspector general identified 6.5 million Social Security numbers that are older than 112 years. According to Social Security records, the individuals who were issued these numbers were born before June 16, 1901.

One individual, according to her Social Security Number, opened her first bank account in 1869. (We’ll assume it’s a her because women in general live longer.)

The problem stems from no death date ever being entered for those Social Security numbers, and those same numbers still being used for a variety of purposes, all of them fraudulent (unless, of course, you really are 112 years old or older). So, at least on paper, the individuals associated with those Social Security numbers have exceeded the maximum reasonable life expectancy.

The truth is, people aren’t really living that long. According to the Gerontology Research Group, only 35 people made it to the ripe-old of age of 112 as of October 2013. And that’s worldwide.

Living an extra-long time got us thinking about data and how it’s stored and backed up. How long does data “live”? The better question is: How long does the device on which the data is stored or backed up to live?

  • Data stored on tape: Data stored on tape starts to disappear when the tape starts losing its magnetic charge. Not only is tape susceptible to wear and tear, high humidity and temperatures are problematic. Maybe 10 to 30 years, but we’re not talking centenary storage.
  • Data stored on CDs and DVDs: According to the Optical Storage Technology Association, the unrecorded shelf life of CDs and DVDs is between 5 to 10 years. For recorded CDs and DVDs, perhaps 25 years.
  • Data stored on drives: Hard to say. According to one study, three years is the point where hard drives start wearing out.
  • Data in the cloud: Forever (even centenarians with fake Social Security numbers can’t compete).

Although cloud computing is relatively new, Mozy by EMC has been around since 2005, which makes us one of the oldest cloud backup services. If the Social Security Administration were to issue the Mozy cloud a Social Security number, our number would be in perpetuum.

BTW, if you’ve got your sights set on living to be a century old—or coming as close as possible—here is some information that should prove useful:

  • Maintain some level of activity (like the doctor from Paris who even at the age of 99 walked up three sets of stairs every day on the way up to his study).
  • Move to a geographical area where people live longer than average (if you don’t speak Japanese, it’s time to learn! Okinawans live longer than anyone else in the world).
  • Eat, but not too much (and eating the right kinds of foods will help; foods such as fruits, vegetables, and whole grains).

Efficient cloud-based backup

Although it’s true that most large organizations rely on on-premises backup solutions, many of those organizations realize that backing up to the cloud is making more and more financial sense. For those organizations that are just now looking into the cloud, the idea of building and managing another data center might seem formidable and expensive. But that’s not how it is; just the opposite is true.

Building and managing a remote and reliable data center for backup and disaster recovery is easier than you might think; it even makes good financial sense. That last part—good financial sense—is particularly important in this day of ongoing cost-cutting measures. It isn’t likely that the need to further decrease costs and increase efficiencies is ever going to fall by the wayside. (Try telling your finance department and shareholders that decreasing costs and increasing efficiencies no longer matter!)

Why does a cloud-based backup solution make sense? Two words: capital expenditure. Actually, it makes more sense to mention four key words: capital expenditure and operating expenses. Recent research demonstrates that organizations that implement cloud solutions are enjoying significant benefits, among them (1) no capital expenditure for hardware, (2) very little up-front cost, and (3) minimal administrative overhead.

Those benefits become particularly important when you consider that more than 40 percent of respondents to a recent survey indicated that reducing IT infrastructure costs was the top benefit of backing up and protecting their data in the cloud. Here are the top-five most common benefits:

  1. Reducing IT infrastructure costs
  2. Reducing complexity within the IT environment
  3. Reduced IT personnel costs
  4. Improved user productivity
  5. Reduced power and cooling costs

An interesting aspect of benefit #3 is that reducing IT personnel costs doesn’t necessarily mean more workers in the unemployment line. Not by a long shot. Because cloud backup is a cost-effective way to protect your servers and computers, IT personnel who once worked on on-premises backup solutions can now focus on other important tasks; they can be repurposed to work on more strategic onsite systems and/or applications.

It’s no surprise that organizations large and small—and everything in between—are becoming more and more reliant on digital capabilities. With those capabilities come opportunities for growth and success; however, the exposure to threats to data is increasing dramatically.

In the beginning, sending data to the cloud might have seemed like a challenging prospect, perhaps more bother than benefit. But that’s certainly not the case today. Security and trust are essential elements of the cloud. The uncompromising physical security of offsite data centers, the backing of third-party certifications and validations, the experience and reputation of the cloud provider monitoring and management, the ability to restrict data access and, should it ever become necessary, the capability of restoring data all contribute to keeping data safe, secure, and accessible.

Once you understand and embrace the benefits of the cloud, you can focus additional energy on supporting your business goals and doing more with existing resources. That kind of efficiency makes all kinds of good sense.