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Three Vital Tech Tools for Self-Published Authors

Tech tools for self publishing authorsAdvancements in technology have opened up the literary world for hopeful authors. Not too long ago, the only way for writers to get their work published and distributed was with the help of big-name publishing houses. Thanks to the Internet and a variety of tools, self-publishing is now a popular and easy method for individuals to market and sell their books to the masses.

Based on discussions with some authors who have successfully self-published, there are several tech services that make the process easy. Here are the top three they mentioned:

1. Online Self-Publishing Platforms: One of the very first thing someone who wants to self publish has to find is a website that will do the printing, publishing, and distribution for them. CreateSpace and LuLu are two of the largest. Both offer “print on demand” services, which means that books are printed only when someone orders a copy, so neither the author nor the publisher is responsible for unsold inventory.

“One of the greatest benefits of publishing now is print on demand,” explains Jed Diamond, PhD, author of several books focused on helping men live long and well. Jed is the founder of the website Men Alive, and has been self publishing since the 1980s. His most recent book is MenAlive: Stop Killer Stress with SimpleEnergy Healing Tools. “In 1983 I had to buy 2,000 books to get the price per book down to a price that anyone would buy.” Diamond said. ”Now I can literally have one book printed when I need it and the price is not only reasonable, but you can actually make a decent profit.”

2. Social Media: When authors go through the big publishing houses,they get the support of a marketing team to help promote their book. When self-publishing, most authors have to do the selling themselves. Perhaps the best free way to get exposure these days is through social media. Sites like Twitter, Linked In, Google +, and the app Goodreads all allow writers to reach out to potential readers.

Bonnie Nordling is a children’s writer who is currently working on self-publishing her first book series about the time-traveling teddy bear Sir Teddy Bertie. Nordling is fairly new to the industry, and without the backing of a publishing company she had to work on getting attention through social media. ”Social media has helped me finally feel like an ‘author’ because I am linked to other authors and am constantly reading tweets and messages from people in the same industry,” Nordling said. “You get to learn about your competition, but the trick is to not let it intimidate you. Social media is fun and when ‘work’ is fun, then it is even more likely to pay off.”

3. Cloud/Data Backup: Authors don’t write a book in one sitting (at least not most of them). It takes time and effort. It takes several drafts and edits. So what happens if someone is three-quarters finished with their newest book and their computer crashes? That’s where cloud and data backup services come into play. By having their writing backed up somewhere other than their computer, a crash or accidental deletion becomes much less disastrous.

“My computer only had to scare me once with that blue screen of death before I started to back up on the cloud every time,” says Dr. LeslieBeth Wish, self-published author of several self-help books for women and love, including the upcoming Adventures of Almost Smart Cookie. “Using cloud technology also frees up your computer space, which is often needed for authors.”

Conclusion

Diamond, Nordling, and Wish all agree that online publishing sites, cloud, and social media are extremely important for authors who want to self-publish. The beauty of self-publishing is that it allows anyone to write a book and get it published. However, in order for it to actually be purchased and read, authors have to do a little more than just ink their stories.

 

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Technically Speaking: Stories of the Week – July 1

Each week we scour the internet to find the best stories on technology, digital living and news of note. This week features an electric car that can go 186 MPH, video on Instagram, and the FAA considering more lenient rules on using electronics during flights. All that and more in this edition of Mozy’s Technically Speaking.

Nissan Announces the World’s Fastest Electronic Car


Imagine cruising around in this beauty. It’s the Nissan ZEOD RC, the world’s fastest electric car, able to travel at a speed of 186 MPH. The next stop for the ZEOD RC (“zero-emmissions on-demand racing car”) will be next year’s 24 Hours of Le Mans auto race, reports Charlie White of Mashable.The car uses the same lithium-ion batteries as the Nissan Leaf, another electric car made by the automaker. Nissan plans to test out several combinations of electric motors and gasoline engines before the car takes to the race track in 2014.

Good News for Frequent Flyers: Some Electronics May Be Allowed During Takeoff and Landing

The FAA is looking into easing its restrictions on in-flight gadget use, reports Sara Gates of the Huffington Post. This may take some time, however, because current FAA rules state that before a gadget can be approved for use the airline must test each iteration of a device on each type of plane. Last year a panel of experts was assembled to review the current rules and regulations and plans to release its report in late September. Currently the FAA allows certain devices, like tablets and iPods, once the plane reaches an altitude of 10,000 feet. Although the FAA is hopeful that it may be able to ease some of the restrictions, it looks like full use of mobile phones will still be prohibited.

Instagram Launches 15-Second Video Feature


Popular photo-sharing social network Instagram now lets users share video as well.Video On Instagram allows users to create 15-second videos to share on the site. It includes simple editing capabilities and 13 new filters created just for video. Video On Instagram is available on both iOS and Android and is aimed to increase the company’s already impressive numbers of 130 million monthly users, 16 billion shared photos, and over a billion “likes.” The launch comes at the heels of Vine, the Twitter-owned app that lets users share 6-second videos, which launched earlier this year.

Tablet Shipments to Increase by 68 Percent this Year

A recent study by Gartner shows that the tech industry is alive and well, with shipments of tablets, smartphones and PCs expected to increase by 6 percent worldwide this year. According to CNET, the main reason for the increase in shipment percentage is due to the massive amount of tablets being sold. Tablet shipments alone will jump 68 percent to 202 million–plenty of make up for the lag in PC shipments (desktops and laptops), which will drop 10.6 percent to 305 million. Meanwhile mobile phone sales are still huge and will increase by 4.3 percent to 1.8 billion.

Technically Speaking: Stories of the Week – June 24

Each week we scour the internet to find the best stories on technology, digital living and news of note. This week features a flying bicycle, the new PS4, and a revamped version of MySpace. All that and more in this edition of Mozy’s Technically Speaking.

E.T. Would Love This Flying Bicycle

Flying Bike

It’s an invention that will surely bring people back to the days they first saw E.T. fly on a bicycle in the classic 1982 film. In a convention in Prague recently a flying electric bicycle was displayed and could be seen taking off and flying with a dummy on board, says Keith Barry of Wired. Known as the “Design Your Dreams Flying Bike,” the invention was created by three Czech engineering firms who have spent the last year making it. The electric bike, which weighs 220 pounds, is lifted into the air by six horizontally mounted propellers. The creators say the finished product could be ready for use by the fall, and it will be as easy to operate as a regular bicycle. It will be able to fly anywhere from three to five minutes using electric power. The bad news? As of now the bike won’t be sold to the public.

Google Buys Popular Traffic App Waze for More Than a Billion Dollars

The mapping service company Waze, whose app is used by more than 50 million people, was purchased by Google last week for more than a billion dollars, reports Parmy Olson of Forbes. Waze’s product development team will remain in Israel and continue to operate separately for now. Google won out in a bidding war that was said to include many high rolling suitors, including Facebook and Apple. No word yet on whether Waze will become part of Google Maps or if it will continue to operate separately. Waze is popular for its community of drivers, who warn one another in real-time of upcoming traffic jams, accidents, and police traps.

MySpace Comes Back as Myspace: Will it Take Off or Crash and Burn?

MySpace is long gone, but say hello to its successor: Myspace. Other than switching from a capital “s” to a lowercase one, the company is also offering a whole new look and all new features, according to Mashable. The recently launched site has been marketed for months now with Justin Timberlake as the face behind the brand. It is now available to users, complete with an iPhone app, and it’s main focus will be on music. The vision of the new myspace, according to one of its new owners, Tim Vanderhook, is “a single place to house a profile, music, videos and fans, and a feedback system.”  Instead of building custom radio stations based on songs and user preferences like Pandora, Myspace is relying on its users— which includes many artists— to create stations.

A Look at the New PlayStation 4

PlayStation 4

Sony has just unveiled it’s new PS4 model, wetting the appetite of gamers worldwide. The console actually has a familiar look to past models but a lot of upgraded features, according to Brian Barrett of Gizmodo. Features of the PS4 include improved graphics, games booting instantly from sleep, games can download in the background, an x86 processor, an 8-core combined CPU/GPU, 8 GB of unified GDDR5 memory (PS3 had 512 megabytes), a local 500GB HDD. There’s also a list of games that will be exclusive to Playstation, including favorites like Final Fantasy XV and Kingdom Hearts III. The console will be available sometime this holiday season and will retail for $400.

 

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Technically Speaking: Stories of the Week – June 17

Each week we scour the internet to find the best stories on technology, digital living and news of note. This week features a Google gets a Siri, a brain surgery is shown online, and Microsoft launches the new Xbox One console. All that and more in this edition of Mozy’s Technically Speaking.

Brain Surgery Procedure Broadcast Over Twitter, Instagram and Vine

Brain surgery streamed online

UCLA Health recently allowed the world to tune in as surgeons implanted a brain pacemaker in a patient. Tweets were sent out explaining what was being done and how the procedure was going. Also, a six-second video was posted on Vine and featured the patient playing guitar and singing during the process (something he was asked to do to keep him engaged). Amanda Kooser of CNET reports that allowing the public to follow along with the procedure it would bring more publicity to the implantable deep brain stimulation devices that can have a profound positive effect on the lives of people with Parkinson’s, chronic headaches, and dystonia. As of this writing, it is unknown if brain pacemakers will have any effect on addictions to Instagram or Vine.

Twitter Ramps Up Security with Two-Step Verification Process

Having seen a fair share of major accounts hacked over the last few months (including the one for the Associated Press, which falsely reported explosions at the White House), Twitter has decided to make it’s platform more secure. NBC News reports that Twitter users will now be asked to register a verified phone number and a confirmed email address. They will then receive a text message with a six-digit code each time they log into Twitter. In short, users will now need two proofs of identity when logging in—their normal password and a temporary code sent to a cellphone or generated by an app. So if a password is hacked it won’t be enough for someone to access the account.

Xbox’s New Console to Offer Much More than Gaming

Microsoft Xbox One

With it’s new console “One,” Microsoft’s Xbox is looking to change the dynamic of the gaming industry. Xbox one plans to not only allow users to play video games, but it will also serve as an intersection between gaming, television, and other entertainment, according to Chelsea Stark of Mashable. The Xbox One will box run on a 8-core AMD processor with x86 architecture, 8 gigs of RAM, a 500 GB hard drive, three USB 3.0 ports, and a Blu-ray drive. It features 802.11 n/g/b wireless with Wi-Fi Direct, as well as Bluetooth. It can hook to cable boxes and recommend programs to users based on interests. There’s also a revamp of the Kinect feature, which will be able to transmit video at 1080p. Users will also be able to control the console with voice activation–for example saying “Xbox on” will turn the device on without having to press any buttons.

Google’s New Search Will Feature Voice Commands and Verbal Answers

Google has introduced a new feature that will allow users to speak questions to its search engine and receive an answer–verbally. According to The Huffington Post, a new mobile application, coming to both smartphones and desktops, will give users the ability to speak directly to a search engine using a huge variety of commands, and Google will understand and respond. While it’s a similar idea to Siri, Apple’s voice-answering technology, Google says it’s main difference is that it can answer questions in full detail. According to the company the new feature will be available “soon” on iOS, Android, and Chrome.

 

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HIPAA to Healthcare Professionals: Get On the Cloud

HIPAA to Healthcare Professionals - Get On the CloudAs the healthcare industry goes digital, the mountains of paper documents are becoming weightless records stored in the cloud. This change is beneficial to both doctors and patients alike, helping to save time and money, and making processes much simpler. While many healthcare providers have embraced the digital changeover, some are still lagging behind. Now Congress is making sure they get on board.

Driving the migration of records to the cloud are two laws, HIPAA (the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act) omnibus and ARRA (the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act). According to Scott Good of Forbes, “by 2015, all medical professionals with access to patient records must utilize electronic medical and health records (EMR and EHR), or face penalties.”

Moving medical records to the cloud isn’t just about compliance. It’s also opening up new opportunities to care for patients.

Matthew Toohey is a pediatrician for a private practice in Pennsylvania and the co-founder of the website PediatricianNextDoor.com, which provides information on medicine and parenting. Toohey began his career with a practice that did not use digital records and has now moved on to one that does.

“This is a whole new frontier. It’s all new to the industry and it’s evolving so fast,” Toohey said of electronic medical records (EMR) and cloud-based services. “It can change the whole makeup of how people practice medicine. You can have all of your patient records on an iPad and access if from anywhere. Cloud-based services can eliminate a lot of headaches.”

Toohey said another benefit of healthcare going digital is that it’s much easier for doctors to fill prescriptions because they can do it with the click of a button rather than having to call it in. Also, several practices are now able to provide “patient portals” which allow patients to access their records from their home computers.

As far as why some healthcare providers have been reluctant to switch to EMR and cloud computing, Toohey believes it could be due to security concerns or simply a lack of knowledge about the benefits.

HIPAA is taking security concerns into account, however, by creating a 10-point checklist to determine if a cloud provider is is up to its standards. Some of the requirements include specific security procedures, encryption of data, regular monitoring, disaster recovery, and more.

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Technically Speaking: Stories of the Week – June 10

Each week we scour the internet to find the best stories on technology, digital living and news of note. This week features a massive online food delivery service, Google Maps upgrades, and a phone that gives off scents. All that and more in this edition of Mozy’s Technically Speaking.

The Device that Makes Your Phone Smell Good

ChatPerf device

While smart phones today are pretty good at appealing to most of your senses, they haven’t yet been able to satisfy your sense of smell–until now. Jesse Emspak of Mashable reports that the Japanese company ChatPerf has created a smartphone add-on that releases a scent when the user presses a “puff” button on their screen. Just the size of a USB stick, the device will enable users to send scents to each other, which could go along with photos, videos, and other media.

Brain Dominance Can Be Determined By the Way You Hold Your Phone

Are you left-brain or right-brain dominant? It’s not as easy to answer as it is to tell if you’re left-handed or right-handed, but a new study shows that most people who hold their cell phones to their left ear are right-hemisphere dominant and vice versa, says Elizabeth Armstrong Moore of CNET.  Someone who is “left-brained” is often said to be more logical, analytical and objective, while those who are “right-brained” tend to be more intuitive, thoughtful and subjective. The results of the study, which was conducted by researchers at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit, could help understand the language center of the brain and develop a less-invasive, lower-cost option to establish the side of the brain where speech and language occurs.

A Perfect Solution to Late-Night Munchies

A perfect solution to late-night munchies

Two online food delivery startups have merged to create a dream service for people who love late-night food but can’t go out to get it. According to GigaOM, the merger of GrubHub and Seamless creates the biggest take-out and delivery portal on the web, featuring more than 20,000 restaurants in 500 cities. GrubHub has not only allowed customers to order from thousands of menus, it also started a feature to be able to track your delivery–so if your food is taking too long you can find out what’s going on. As GrubHub’s biggest competitor before the merger, Seamless features a similar service to GrubHub and even lets customers browse ratings and reviews of most restaurants.

Google Maps To Be Given Complete Redesign

The site that has helped many people avoid getting lost is receiving some improvements. Google Maps will have a whole new look and will launch some useful new features, including displays of real-time accidents and personalized recommendations, says Heather Kelly of CNN. The new customized maps feature will display more personal information related to the user, as well as suggestions for places to visit based on past searches and Internet activity. The smarter navigation will improve upon finding the fastest routes for users, and will include live information about accidents and road conditions. Finally, the graphics of Google Maps will also be bigger and better.

 

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Technically Speaking: Stories of the Week – June 4

Each week we scour the internet to find the best stories on technology, digital living and news of note. This week features a mask with super powers, the start of 5G technology, and a flying car. All that and more in this edition of Mozy’s Technically Speaking.

Travel Like the Jetsons: Flying Cars Are Only a Few Years Away

Flying Car

In about eight years, sitting in traffic on the roadway could be a thing of the past. That’s because a thing of the future, flying cars, is looking like a reality, according to Chris Taylor of Mashable. The Massachusetts company Terrafugia is working on a full-on futuristic flying car, the TF-X, which it expects to start selling in the early 2020s. It’s being called a cross between a helicopter, plane, and self-driving car. For the most part,the TF-X will be a self-driving vehicle, using a system like autopilot works on a plane. The company predicts that learning to operate one will take as little as five hours of training.Right now no cost has been announced, but Terrafugia has hinted that it will pre-sell models to a select few customers in 2015 for $270,000. Is it worth that much to beat the traffic?

Does Facebook Make It Harder to Move on From Past Relationships?

Breaking up is hard to do–but with Facebook it’s even harder. Changing a Facebook status from “in a relationship” to “single” is an extremely painful process for manybroken-hearted people, says Chris Matyszczyk of CNET. A University of California Santa Cruz study found that Facebook users had difficulty deleting their digital memories. Half of those surveyed for the study said they immediately get rid of all signs of their exes (photos, posts, etc.), but they end up regretting it later. A third of those surveyed said they can’t bring themselves to delete the photos at all–hoping to cling to any memories they have.

Samsung’s New 5G Technology Would Be Several-Hundred Times Faster than 4G

Samsung announced this week that it has developed the blueprint for 5G mobile communications technology. Dave Thier of Forbes says that the company is saying that 5G would be so fast that movies could be downloaded in mere seconds. According to Samsung’s announcement, the new technology ”will allow users to transmit massive data files including high quality digital movies practically without limitation. As a result, subscribers will be able to enjoy a wide range of services such as 3D movies and games, real-time streaming of ultra high-definition (UHD) content, and remote medical services.” If this 5G technology materializes, it could be powerful enough to take over all wireless Internet connections, causing some concern for cable companies and Internet service providers alike.

High-Tech Mask and Helmet System Allows You to Adjust Your Senses

Edios Mask

It’s users may look a lot like Bane from the latest Batman movie, but a new mask and helmet combo created by the group Eidos offers up some really unique features. James Plafke of Extreme Tech reports that the device allows its users to manually adjust their sight and hearing on the fly, changing the two senses based on specific environments and circumstances. At a sporting event a user could turn the volume up or down; change the view to closer up or farther away. At a convention it could be used to hear a presenter from the back of a crowd. The device is put on by placing it over each ear, and wrapping across the lower half of the face, including the mouth and nose.

 

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Technically Speaking: Stories of the Week – May 28

Each week we scour the internet to find the best stories on technology, digital living and news of note. This week features a shirt that cleans itself, a bigger Kindle Fire, and a keyboard for people prone to spilling drinks. All that and more in this edition of Mozy’s Technically Speaking.

How to Build a Movie Theater in Your Backyard Without Going Broke

Open Air Cinema

With the warmer weather rolling around, wouldn’t it be nice to have an open-air movie theater in the backyard? The idea seems a little far-fetched for those without deep pockets, but with the right hardware it’s probably less expensive than many people would think. Rick Broida of CNET explains how an outdoor cinema can be created for about $1000. Components needed for the setups include a projector (approximately $700), a blue-ray player ($40-$50), a screen (around $170), and a sound system (around $200). Many of the items can be found for less (especially if purchased used or refurbished ones) and some can even be built.

New Kindle Fire will Have 10-Inch Screen

Amazon is preparing a new Kindle Fire that will be 10 inches, increasing more than an inch in size from last year’s 8.9 inch model, says Brandon Russell of TechnoBuffalo. Other features will include a 2,560 x 1,600 resolution screen, and an affordable price tag. The device is expected to help Amazon continue to compete in the tablet market with big guns like Apple and Nexus. Amazon also plans to release newer versions of its 7-inch and 8.9-inch models.

Logitech Creates iPad Keyboard Folio that Protects Against Spills

Attention spillers: Logitech has created a new keyboard folio that may protect your iPad from your clumsiness. Engadget reports that the company’s new FabricSkin model has a liquid-repellent coating.The Bluetooth keyboard also doesn’t have any openings, meaning no liquid can get inside. The product, which costs $149, is set to be released this month and can be pre-ordered on the Logitech website.

The World’s First Curved OLED Television is Here

LG1

LG has created the world’s first 55-inch OLED television which is designed to bring ”IMAX-like” experience, with the entire screen surface being equally distant from the viewer’s eyes. The television is currently available for pre-order in South Korea and should be available in other markets in “the months ahead”, according to Mashable’s Stan Schroeder The TV is 4.3 0.17 inches thin, and weights just over 37 pounds. It features LG’s WRGB and Color Refiner technologies, and its clear stand doubles as speakers due to its baked-in transparent film speakers. The current price in South Korea is 15 million KRW, roughly $13,500, but prices have yet to be announced for other markets.

Never Do Laundry Again; The Shirt that Cleans Itself

An entrepreneur has come up with a button-down shirt that never wrinkles and stays odor free–so it can be worn over and over without being washed. The “better button-down” is made of wool that’s three times thinned than a human hair, CNET reports. The founder claims that the thin wool makes the shirts extra resistant to moisture. So far on Kickstarter the shirt has been a huge success, as $290,000 has been raised in just over a week.

 

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Technically Speaking: Stories of the Week – May 10

Each week we scour the internet to find the best stories on technology, digital living and news of note. This week features the tenth birthday of the iTunes store, pajamas that read to kids, and an app that keeps tabs on man’s best friend. All that and more in this edition of Mozy’s Technically Speaking.

iTunes Store Celebrates 10 Year Anniversary


It may not seem like it, but the iTunes store has now officially been around for 10 years. With iTunes, Apple forever changed the music industry, providing fans a way to legally access and own music online, says Megan Gibson of Time. In a time where many companies were trying to fight off illegal downloads, Apple developed an alternative that stuck around. This marked the birth of a digital music revolution, which later led to advancements and other services like Pandora and Spotify. iTunes continues to thrive 10 years later and there’s no sign of things slowing down anytime soon.

AT&T Launches App-Based Home Security System

AT&T has jumped into the home security market with its new “Digital Life” a wireless, personalized, app-based home security solution, according to eWeek. The solution allows users to remotely check in on their homes in real time, receive emails or texts alerting them to an issue, and remotely unlock or lock doors and windows. It’s an all-IP solution, running over AT&Ts 3G network. The company is offering several different packages ranging in price from $29.99 a month with a $149 setup fee to $39.99 with a $249 setup fee. There are also a variety of add-ons available. Digital Life is currently available in 15 markets and should be in 50 by the end of the year.

Is Your Dog Too Lazy? This New Tech Product Will Help You Find Out

A new product known as FitBark is a small device that attaches to a dog’s collar and keeps track of all activity, allowing owners to keep tabs on how active their pooch is. Emily Price of Mashable reports that data from the device is transferred to the cloud either through the owner’s smartphone, or a small “home base” station placed in the house. At the end of each day FitBark provides a “Bark Score” letting owners know how much exercise their dog got over the 24 hour period. The objective is to help make sure dogs stay active and healthy. It can also be useful when taking the dog to the vet because exact details can be given about recent lulls in activity.

Father of Six Invents Pajamas That Tell Stories to Children

Pajamas Read Books to Kids

Keeping one child entertained can be quite a task. Taking care of six? Now that’s quite a handful. Juan Murdoch, an Iowa father of six, has come up with the idea for smart, storytelling pajamas, reports Wilson Rothman of NBC News. There are 47 unique dot patterns on the pajamas, and each triggers a story or an animal lesson when scanned with a smartphone or tablet. There are free apps that go with the pajamas, one that has readings of Mother Goose, the Brothers Grimm and Hans Christian Andersen classics; and a second that has pictures and information about 47 different animals. The inventor says he hopes to have at least three more apps out by Christmas. The pajamas can be purchased for $25 a piece.

 

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As Distance Learning Grows, Technology Follows

Online Education

Master Sergeant Eric Madden has been in the Air Force for 16 years. He’s currently stationed at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst in New Jersey as a Health Service Manager in the Medical Group. With a job requiring frequent travel, Eric never thought it would be possible to perform his duties while also pursuing a college degree. But thanks to the technology of distance learning, he’s currently enrolled at Burlington County College.

“The only way I would be able to complete my degree is with distance learning,” Madden explained. “With how much military members move around it would almost be impossible to finish your degree without being able to take classes online. Distance learning makes it so you can stay in one school and meet all your requirements and not have to worry about transferring.”

Madden is hardly alone. According to the 2012 Survey of Online Learning conducted by the Babson Survey Research Group, the number of students taking at least one online course is now more than 6.7 million.

“The rate of growth in online enrollments remains extremely robust, even as overall higher education enrollments have shown a decline,” said study co-author Jeff Seaman, Co-Director of the Babson Survey Research Group.

As the demand for online learning increases, higher education publishing companies have been forced to keep up, creating new ideas and technology to make the distance learning process easier for both teachers and students.

Pearson Learning Solutions has created an Online Learning Exchange, which provides teachers shareable and editable course content and materials to use in distance education courses.

“Learning is no longer limited to four walls – learning can happen anywhere – and it already is happening everywhere, everyday,” said Todd Hitchcock, Senior Vice President of Online Solutions for Pearson Learning Solutions. ”The growth of online learning underscores this need for quality, flexible education programs that meet the demands of our 21st-century workforce.”

Now that he is able to get his degree, Madden feels as though it will help him become better prepared for his everyday duties. He also looks towards the future, and when he retires from the military the degree will make him much more marketable.

Madden encourages other members of the military–or anyone else in a situation where they cannot physically make it to a college campus–to consider distance learning. “This is a huge plus because it gives you education for your job and for your future,” he said. “It is also a big deal for the military. Distance Education helps individuals contribute at a higher level.”

 

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