Blog Archives

Links of Interest – July 26

Twitter Is Working on a Way to Retrieve Your Old Tweets

Old TweetsTwitter gives users access only to the last few thousand posts made to the site.

But Dick Costolo, Twitter’s chief executive, promises that this will eventually change, according to a post by The New York Times.

“We’re working on a tool to let users export all of their tweets,” Mr. Costolo said in a meeting with reporters and editors at The New York Times. “You’ll be able to download a file of them.”

Other social media services, most notably Facebook, already allow users to download a file with all their data. Twitter has been slower to roll out a similar service, although a number of third-party services and developers have cobbled together ways to let people sift through portions of Twitter’s vast collection of messages. One recently released site, called oldtweets, lets people root through some of the first messages ever sent through Twitter’s servers. (Curious about what people were tweeting about in 2006? Comically dated topics like “Returning movies to Blockbuster” and “Chatting with friends on MySpace.”)

10 Favorite Rumors About Apple`s Next Smartphone

The Apple iPhone 5 may or may not arrive in September. Or be super thin but extra big. Or feature a new dock, according to eWEEK.com.

There is no shortage of rumors, speculations or forecasts about a device—even the name iPhone 5 is a guess—that Apple has yet to officially breathe a word about. What is known is Apple finally has a real competitor in Samsung.

Past comparisons of iPhones to Android sales figures have been silly, as they weighed Apple against a handful of manufacturers. Samsung, however, has pulled ahead of the rest of the Android pack, and smartphone for smartphone, the South Korean giant has out-sold Apple during the first quarter of this year and likely also the second. When Samsung introduced the Galaxy S III in May, it showed its hand (and the public liked what it saw; Samsung has very publicly struggled to make supply meet demand).

Now following Samsung, the pressure is on. Apple has so succeeded at wowing the public during its staged events, the bar couldn’t be set higher.

Today’s Women of Space Remember Sally Ride

Sally Ride, the first U.S. female astronaut to fly in space, died July 23 at the age of 61 from pancreatic cancer. First launching on the Challenger space shuttle in 1983, Ride has become an enduring inspiration to people everywhere, particularly women working in science and engineering.

Ride’s place as the first American female astronaut was a long time coming, according to Wired. As far back as the Mercury program, NASA considered female astronaut candidates but the agency did not take the idea very seriously. Ride joined NASA in 1978, in the first astronaut class to include women, and trained for five years. Prior to her deployment on the Challenger mission, she endured sexist questions from reporters, shrugging them off by saying, “It’s too bad this is such a big deal. It is too bad our society isn’t further along.”

 

MozyHome with Stash

 

Cloud roundup and links of interest – July 19

Next Kindle Fire Expected to Be Thinner, With Better Display

As sales of the first-generation Kindle Fire cool off, Amazon is gearing up to launch its successor, a tablet that seeks to improve on the original while retaining a similar form.

Sources familiar with Amazon’s plans tell AllThingsD that the company hopes to debut the next iteration of the Kindle Fire in the second half of this year. To do so, Amazon has been approaching developers to bring them up to speed on the new hardware.

According to the report, key changes to the next generation Fire are expected to include:

- A thinner and lighter design than the original

- A built-in camera

- Much-improved display quality with an entirely new width-to-height ratio

Two Apps Keep Your iPhone and iPad Data Private

2 Apps Keep Your Information PrivateWhile the free Find My iPhone app can remotely wipe the data on a lost or stolen iPhone or iPad, a pair of $2 apps prevent prying eyes from viewing contact info and other sensitive information on an iPad or iPhone without having to erase everything, according to CNET.com.If you share your iPhone or iPad, there’s probably information on the device you would prefer other users not see. Even if you don’t, you may still want to keep yourprivate information, well, private. Luckily, there are a few applications that can help you retain your info.

The Secure Folder app creates protected areas that other iPhone and iPad apps can’t access. Secure Folder installs a nondescript My Folders icon that you press to launch the app. After you enter your code, you see encrypted folders for photos and videos, addresses, notes, bookmarks, credit cards, and passwords. The files and information entered in the app’s folders are hidden from other programs on the device, according to CNET’s review.

Additionally, the ContactsPro app creates a private address book on an iPhone or iPad that the device’s standard address book doesn’t read. Creating a protected area and moving existing contact info to the ContactsPro address book, however, takes some work, CNET says. All the contacts on the iPhone or iPad are displayed in ContactsPro by default. When you create a group of contacts you can hide all other addresses or those in the groups you choose. You can either import addresses to the ContactsPro list or “connect” to existing addresses, which lets you store additional information about the contact that appears only in the ContactsPro entry.

Lenovo Ultrabook Targets Back-to-School Shoppers With $799 Price

If you’re searching for a reasonably thin Windows laptop with good battery life at a reasonable cost, you couldn’t have picked a better time, according to a review on CNET.com.

The Lenovo IdeaPad U310 is a perfect example: it’s an update to the IdeaPad U300s, a Windows Ultrabook that came with a MacBook Air-like $1,195 price tag. This time, however, the cost is a mere $799.

Students should consider the IdeaPad U310, especially if it’s on sale. You might want to comparison-shop the growing landscape of affordable ultrabooks at the time of purchase and see if you can do better, but the bottom line is this: It’s a good time to purchase a lightweight laptop with impressive firepower. Ultrabooks have larger hard drives (without SSD), and are cheaper than ever, according to CNET. (If you’re considering laptops with or without a solid state drive, check out this article from the Mozy blog.)

 

MozyPro

 

Q&A: Should I wait for the next iPhone to come out, or should I get the Samsung Galaxy S III?

The simple and easy answer would be yes, wait for the next version of the iPhone. But choices are rarely this simple. Although mobile technology makes our lives simpler and easier, it often comes with some big decisions (price, contract details, camera type, etc.).

Why shouldn’t you wait for Apple’s next latest and greatest device? Because with this rationale, you will be perpetually waiting for its next big thing. There will always be something sleeker, smarter and quicker around the corner. And speaking of something sleeker, smarter and quicker, let’s take a closer look at Samsung’s Galaxy S III.

The Galaxy S III could be considered the most impressive Android-based phone to date. It runs the most up-to-date Android operating system, Ice Cream Sandwich, and boasts a screen size of 4.8 inches. Throw in 4G connectivity and Near Field Communication (NFC) technology (which allows you to “bump” your phone with another NFC-enabled phone to exchange photos or certain data), and you’ve got yourself a pretty stellar mobile device.

Initial reviews of the Galaxy S III have been impressive. Although there has been a delay in the handsets reaching some markets, the rising demand may have actually added to the allure of getting one. After all, it’s nice to get something that isn’t at first available to everyone.

The Galaxy S III will provide you with access to more than 500,000 apps in the Google Play market, which should give you more than enough choices to be either super productive or blissfully slacker-ish, depending on the circumstances.

Apple’s App Store still leads the way in terms of total number of apps (650,000), and the iPhone is generally considered more secure if you plan to incorporate your iPhone into your work life.

Apple iPhone 4S vs. Samsung Galaxy S IIIThere’s little doubt the Galaxy S III will provide a pleasant and speedy mobile experience, but let’s face it – it’s going up against the iPhone. This is no small task. After all, Apple brought both RIM’s BlackBerry and Nokia to their knees in just a few short years.

Apple’s iPhone can be likened to a hard-throwing major league pitcher. Apple just rears back and consistently throws 98 mph strikes. Hit it if you can, Apple seems to challenge.

So far, no one can touch the iPhone. As with any Apple release, the sixth-generation iPhone is surrounded by heavy rumor-mongering. The most recent as of this writing is that its release is being moved to August to compete with the larger-than-expected sales figures for the Galaxy S III.

I’d suggest waiting for the next iPhone, but here’s comparison of the two as they stand now:

Apple iPhone 4S

Dimensions: 4.5 by 2.31 by 0.37 inches

Weight: 4.9 ounces

Display: 3.5-inch (on the diagonal) widescreen multi-touch display with a 960 by 640 pixel resolution.

Camera: 8 megapixels, HD video recording, LED flash, autofocus, VGA-quality front-facing camera, photo and video geotagging.

Operating System: iOS 5

Pricing and Capacity: 16GB for $199, 32GB for $299, 64GB for $399 (with two-year contract)

4G: No

NFC: No

Samsung Galaxy S III

Dimensions: 5.38 by 2.78 by 0.34 inches

Weight: 4.69 ounces

Display: 4.8-inch HD Super AMOLED with a resolution of 1280 by 720

Camera: 8 megapixels, HD video recording, auto focus with flash and zero shutter lag, 1.9-megapixel front-facing camera with HD recording, zero shutter lag

Operating System: Android 4.0 (Ice Cream Sandwich)

Pricing and Capacity: 16GB and 32GB versions are available; pricing varies by carrier, but most are selling the 16GB version for $199 with a two-year contract. Pricing varies more for the 32GB model. Sprint sells it for $249.99, T-Mobile for $329.99.

4G: Yes

NFC: Yes

 

Mozy Mobile App

 

Just Say No to App Overload

Just Say No to App OverloadIt started innocently enough. The first one was free. So you tried it. And you liked it. And you wanted more. So you went back, this time handing over $1.99. It was good, but it could have been better, so you tried one for $6.99.

Before you knew it, your smartphone began to resemble a sort of third-rate strip mall, a hodgepodge of how to speak Thai, how to win at poker, how to properly carve a turkey. Your reliance on applications didn’t pass unnoticed, but you began making excuses, saying you were just downloading them for a friend.

As an app-aholic, downloading apps began to affect your life negatively in the following ways: You were recklessly wasting precious megabytes on your phone, you were spending more than any man should on ‘80s arcade games, and you were leading an all-around disorganized mobile existence that was affecting your work performance.

Don’t give up, though. There is help, and it only takes three or four steps to bring order back to your iPhone or Android device. Read on to find out how to restore organization to your smartphone’s applications.

Cut Ties With the Past 

That Bubblewrap app certainly provided you with hours of mindless fun, but that was three years ago. It’s time to let go of the past and move on. Delete it. It’s simply doing you no good on page 8 of your apps screen.

Call it tough love, but it’s a good idea to habitually go through your apps and get rid of ones that no longer provide any meaningful function. If you haven’t used an app in six months, cut it loose. If you find you need it again, you can always reinstall it on your phone without having to pay for it again.

There’s a Folder for That

The iPhone and Android devices have a super handy feature that allows you to group similar apps into a folder. This greatly reduces the overall clutter and sprawl that got you into this predicament in the first place, and it helps you quickly locate an app when you need it instead of having to scroll through numerous pages.

With the iPhone, simply touch one of the apps you’d like to add to a folder, wait for it to shake and then place it on top of another similar app and both will be added to the new folder. Simple as that, and each folder can hold 12 apps on the iPhone. Using this system, all of your apps could fit on just one screen.

Edit Before You Get It

Don’t be afraid to edit your app purchases before you make them, the same way you would weigh the pros and cons before buying anything. Sure, they’re cheap enough to buy on a whim, but so is malt liquor. Just because something is cheap doesn’t mean it’s a good idea.

If you’re confident the app will make communicating with co-workers or customers better, then go for it. If you think it might be good for only one or two uses, hold off.

It’s easy for life and work to get a bit messy every now and again. An easy way to begin regaining some order can simply start with your smartphone.

As far as restoring order to the garage, well, you’re on your own.

 

MozyHome

 

Cloud Roundup and Links of Interest – June 26

Retina MacBook vs. PC Laptops: The Battle Begins

At its recent Worldwide Developer Conference, Apple introduced the MacBook Pro with Retina display, its latest laptop. This appears to confirm that Apple will eventually merge its Air line with its MacBook line, a move long expected by Apple watchers.

Now that Apple has taken the wraps off its next-generation device, where does that leave the rest of the PC industry? PC World asks, “Can Apple’s new Retina MacBook Pro rain on the PC laptop or Intel’s Ultrabook parade? Or will Apple, once again, inspire another flood of PC clones as it did with the MacBook Air and the ensuing Ultrabook onslaught?”

Ultrabooks and other Windows-based laptops headed your way in the coming months are bound to be interesting once Microsoft releases the touch-friendly Windows 8, expected in October. Read more about it here.

Being More Productive With Mobile Tech

Businessman on mobile phoneThere’s no doubt mobile technology has changed our lives and the way we communicate. But it’s also a great way to keep ideas from fading away forever. ZDNet’s James Kendrick writes about the importance of having a mobile device handy at all times, and the benefits of being able to capture that great idea before your attention is pulled in another direction.

“Mobile technology plays a major role in my work, as it lets me capture ideas when they occur no matter where I am. Gadgets have evolved to be powerful information capture tools and also make content creation easy,” writes Kendrick.

“In the not-too-distant past many ideas would end up lost, but no longer. I grab information as it becomes available, and I use it to lay the groundwork for writing projects whenever a few minutes presents itself. I can leverage mobile tech to maximum effect, no matter what gadget I am holding.”

Seton Hall University Offers Lumia 900s to Give ‘Freshmen Experience’

Seton Hall University is going the extra mobile mile with an unusual initiative. It’s paired with AT&T and Nokia to distribute units of the popular Lumia 900 LTE Windows Phone to new incoming students in the class of 2016.

University faculty say the phones will help students have 24-7 access to Microsoft’s Office suite. They say the phone giveaway will provide a “more engaged and integrated learning experience,” according to DailyTech.

The phones also include an exclusive piece of content called the “Freshmen Experience”.

Something like a mini-social network, the feature “adds customized social media integration and direct communication channels with [students'] freshmen peers, peer academic advisors, housing information and roommates.”

 

Mozy Mobile Apps

 

How to Get the Best Price for an Old Device

How to get the best price for an old deviceIt seems hardly a week goes by without some must-have (or must-avoid, depending on one’s allegiance) mobile device clamoring for our attention. Apple continues to garner the most publicity every time it releases its latest and greatest product, but let’s not forget about the arsenal of Android devices that have proven their worth in the mobile battlefield.

Add some BlackBerry and Nokia devices doing their best to stay relevant, and there’s a good chance that once you get comfortable with your current smartphone or tablet, you’ll be tempted to upgrade to your company-of-choice’s newest offer.

So what do you do with your perfectly functional yet slightly outdated device? You can relegate it to that bottom drawer in your office, keeping it out of sight from polite company and small children, kind of like how the Fratellis kept Sloth chained up in the basement in The Goonies. You can use it as a device for listening to music or snapping photos, essentially employing it as a specialist, like a lefty middle reliever in baseball or a punt returner in football. Or you can cash in before the product becomes grossly outdated.

Cashing in is the practical choice, as it can add some coin to your pocket while the device goes on to live another day in someone else’s pocket. Here are some tips on getting the most out of your old gadgets and early smartphone iterations.

Good Resale Value Is Key

If you’re not sure how popular a device is, a good place to start is looking on Craigslist.org, eBay.com or Amazon.com to gauge interest.

You could also scroll through the various trade-in sites, according to an article in The New York Times. There are many such sites out there, but here are a few:Swappa.com for Android devices; Glyde.com for gadgets and games; Gazelle.com for Apple products and Android, BlackBerry and other phones; NewtonsHead.com for Apple products (including broken iPhones); BuyBackWorld.com or BuyMyTronics.com for all electronics; and NextWorth.com for phones, cameras, tablets and games.

Apple products are the most popular on many of these sites. In a recent study, Priceonomics.com found mobile phones lost much of their value right away, and then continued to lose value more gradually over time. The exception was the iPhone. After 18 months, the iPhone retained 53 percent of its value, compared with 42 percent for Android phones and 41 percent for BlackBerry, according to The Times.

It Pays to Keep Your Device in Good Working Order

It’s sound advice to protect your from physical damage with cases and covers. Another smart move is to buy an extended warranty from the maker — for example, Apple Care+ for iPhone — or from a third party like SquareTrade. When it comes time to sell, having a warranty that you can transfer has value.

If the screen is cracked, replace it yourself with a kit, or send it to a professional service like Phonedoctors.com or iCracked.com. A flawless iPhone can be worth $60 or more over the value of one in good condition at trade-in time, according to The Times.

Timing Is Everything

Like any other market, it all comes down to timing, but that doesn’t mean you can’t employ some crafty tactics. Decide.com, a website and mobile app that tells when to buy electronics, sifts through millions of pieces of data to guess when a new product is coming out. Decide advises shoppers to buy or wait, using proprietary price and model predictions, according to The Times.

Based on observations of the market for used iPhones and iPads, “the best time to sell is a few weeks before the new iPhone is announced,” Josh Smith of GottaBeMobile, told The Times. “It is possible to get a great price for a used iPhone right now, but many users aren’t willing to go without an iPhone until October.”

 

 

Cloud Roundup and Links of Interest – May 31

Another Chance for Idle ElectronicsAnother Chance for Idle Electronics

More than 278 million mobile devices lie idle or deactivated in the United States, and nearly half are smartphones, according to consultants at Compass Intelligence.

Most of those devices are destined for the recycling heap, but as for the others, that’s cash sitting neglected in drawers, according to an article in The New York Times. Beats by Dr. Dre Studio headphones that sell for $270 new could be worth $200 used. A Wi-Fi-only 16-gigabyte iPad 2 costing $400 new could fetch $300 or more. See how to sell them for the highest price.

Hope for Innovation Is Found in the Cloud

Innovation isn’t dead, it just moved to the cloud, according to GigaOM.

Cloud computing has made innovation something anyone can do, said GigaOM’s Derrick Harris.

“Somewhere in between Pinterest and biotech, startups are using the cloud to make enterprise software available as a service and disrupt the business models of the very companies that helped build Silicon Valley,” Harris writes.

Even though social media companies may dominate the startup landscape, they’re part of a fundamental change in the way people communicate with each other thanks to cloud-based computing resources and the ubiquity of powerful mobile devices.

GigaOM plans to talk more on this subject at the upcoming Structure conference in San Francisco.

President Wants Government Agencies to Focus on Mobile Apps

President Barack Obama has ordered all government agencies to offer more of their services in the form of mobile apps, according to Mashable.

A new memo called “Digital Government: Building a 21st Century Platform to Better Serve the American People” requires each agency to make at least two services, used by the public, available on mobile devices within 12 months.

“For far too long, the American people have been forced to navigate a labyrinth of information across different government programs in order to find the services they need,” says the memo.

“Americans deserve a government that works for them anytime, anywhere, and on any device,” Obama said in a statement.

Mobile App Bump Can Now Push Photos to Your Desktop

Bump Technologies launched a new website feature, allowing Bump’s mobile app users the ability to share smartphone photos to their computers by physically bumping the phone against the PC keyboard, according to AllThingsD.

The photos are hosted online, and users can choose to download the images to their hard drive or share them using a short URL. Previously, Bump’s mobile app allowed for sharing photos and contact information between mobile phones, but not directly to a computer. Find out more about it here.

 

 

Going Mobile: The Benefits of Running Your Company From a Laptop

Run Your Business in the CloudIt won’t be long before you’ll be able to run a global corporation from an iPad, according to a recent article in The New York Times.

Cloud computing allows you to access and manipulate complex corporate software on a relatively simple mobile device. Several leading cloud providers say this approach can be almost 70 percent cheaper than buying and running your own servers. While that percentage is dependent on pricing and several other factors, there’s little doubt the cloud is changing the way businesses are run and how information is accessed.

Running your business in the cloud not only frees up cash, it also shortens your in-office hours, giving you time and space to think outside the box, perhaps using that time to coin a phrase to replace the overused, beaten-to-a-pulp “outside the box.”

So now that you’ve freed yourself from the constraints of your office, what to do with your newly earned mobility? Take in the matinee showing of The Avengers? Fulfill that promise to yourself to spend more time in that old-man bar around the corner?

While saving time and money might be the first and second reasons to turn to the cloud, they’re just the tip of the iceberg.
Here are just a few of the not-so-obvious benefits of running your business in this brave new mobile world.

Crush the Competition

Sure, they’re a nice couple and have been in business for more than 50 years. Customers seem to like them, and who wouldn’t, with their folksy talk and old-fashioned phrases? No doubt about it: They’re a couple of cards.

The problem is they’ve been steadily taking market share, and for that, they must go.

Your new-found mobility allows you to stake out a competitor’s parking lot to gather intel and devise your next foray into espionage. It also allows you the time to find a good lawyer to explain what you were doing in their parking lot at 3 a.m.

Feeling Groovy

It allows you to work anywhere with a WiFi connection such as the Golden Arches or that hippie bookstore. This allows you the creative space to formulate your next great product or service.

Fact: Some of this century’s greatest thought leaders do their most profound thinking in hippie bookstores (in fact, “outside the box” originated in one).

Fact: That’s not really a fact.

Is There Anything Else I Can Help You With Today?

More personal customer service is sure to arise as you embrace your new mobility. Pop in on a customer. See if they need any orders filled or snafus unraveled. After polishing off the last of their donuts and pestering the receptionist, don’t overstay your welcome. Be polite when you’re asked to leave. Be sure to get your parking validated.

Hover ‘Round

Your out-of-office experience will allow you to see how your staff operates in your absence.

Productivity up? Cash rolling in? Chalk it up to your frequent visits to key customers and the savings realized from going to the cloud.

Surely it has nothing to do with your employees being free from your frequent meetings and over-the-shoulder hovering.

In all seriousness, having the ability to run your business while on the go has numerous benefits. Better work-life balance, the ability of resolve problems day or night, and the oft-mentioned cash savings are just a few. Exploring how to enhance your business with mobility is time and money well-spent.

 

 

Cloud Roundup and Links of Interest – May 18

How to Buy a Single Share of Facebook Stock

Facebook’s upcoming initial public offering is attracting more than your typical stock traders, and some of them just want a single share, according to an article in the Los Angeles Times.

The newspaper said websites that sell single shares of stock have been receiving a lot of inquiries about Facebook stock recently from users who are not usually attracted to IPOs.

“People who are buying one share typically never sell it,” OneShare Chief Executive Lance Lee told CNNMoney. “For the underlying company, it shows true brand loyalty.”

Buying a single share of stock typically costs nearly $40 more than the current trading price due to service fees. Like or dislike?

Cloud Adoption Approaching a Crucial Point

There’s a “tipping point” for cloud adoption, according to the CIO at Google, and it’s fast approaching.

Once that point arrives and companies enter the world of cloud computing, there’s no going back–it will become the standard for IT, according to Ben Fried, the search giant’s chief information officer.

An article in Midsize Insider takes a look at this issue and explores how midsize businesses and their IT fit into this new world of cloud computing. Is cloud adoption only meant for large-scale customers, or will it benefit “mom and pop” organizations? Have a look here.

Multitasking Too Much? Strap This on Your Head

Researchers are tapping into the brain’s signals to ease the downsides of multitasking and information overload, a growing problem in digital lifestyles, according to CNET.

Researchers unveiled the Brainput computer interface device at the recent Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI 2012), which explores new human-machine interface designs.

A prototype of the device uses functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) to sense changes in brain patterns that indicate a person is multitasking, and a brain sensor is strapped around the user’s forehead in order to more accurately record when a user is multitasking.

An interesting idea, but the sensor looks like a headband straight out of the ’70s American Basketball Association.

 

 

Tech Tools and Apps That Enhance the Great Outdoors

Tech Tools and Apps that Enhance the Great OutdoorsWho says technology and nature must be mutually exclusive? As the spring season takes root and more of us can’t wait to replace stale office air with the sights and sounds of the outdoors, there are definitely some cool tech tools and apps that make the great outdoors even greater.

While burying your face into the screen of an iPad while hiking a portion of the Appalachian Trail seems counter-intuitive (and rightfully so), there are ways to enhance your outdoor experience with some digital assistance. Here are just a few apps and tools to keep handy while exploring your neck of the woods.

For the Birds

Available on Apple’s App Store for just $2.99 for a limited time (it’s regularly $19.99), Audubon Birds: A Field Guide to North American Birds offers thousands of photos of North American birds, and maps of real-time sightings, among other features and interactive functions.

From the developer:

The newly updated Audubon Birds app has all the right ingredients to enhance your birding experience. Now with eBird, you can experience the thrill of locating birds in real time with quick access to recent sightings, locations of notable and rare birds, and maps and directions to all the birding hotspots across North America. The best bird app just got better!

On the Right Track

A recent article in The New York Times discussed the osprey’s dramatic recovery in Queens over the last few decades and a banding initiative that allows wildlife managers and the public to track, via GPS, the movements of the grand birds with 4-foot wingspans.

That’s Knots

For those of us who enjoy the quiet challenge of fishing, the App Store offers a handy app that demonstrates how to tie different fishing knots. Animated Fishing Knots is just 99 cents and is a great way to familiarize yourself with the art and sport of fishing.

Also helpful if you ever find yourself in a Jaws-like situation such as this:

Quint: [talking Brody through making knots] Little brown eel comes out of the cave… Swims into the hole… Comes out of the hole… Goes back into the cave again… It’s not too good, is it Chief? [Referring to Brody's messed up knot]

iHurt

If you’ve ever seen an episode of the Travel Channel’s When Vacations Attack, you know a free-spirited bungee jump can go from “yay!” to “no way!” in seconds.

While there isn’t an app that can turn back time and allow you to go with your initial gut feeling of “this bungee instructor seems kinda distracted, maybe I’ll sit this round out,” there is an app that contains more than 30 first-aid topics, including CPR, bleeding, burns, choking, drug overdose, bites, stings and many more.

iFirstAid will set you back $2.99, but if you need it, it’s money well spent.

From the developer:

It’s simple one-line memory jogging format helps you act fast when you need it most, in a life or death emergency. But heaps of additional detail is always just one touch away.