Category Archives: Infographics

Protecting Your Identity From Growing Cyber Crime Threats

In 2015 alone, 13.1 million Americans were victims of identity fraud. Even more shocking, identity fraudsters have stolen approximately $112 billion since 2009, which amounts to $35,600 stolen every minute. Thankfully, there are a wide variety of ways to protect your digital identity from the growing number of cybercrimes. These include shielding your keypad when entering important information, not using public Wi-Fi, using unique and different passwords for each website, and backing up your information in case of a ransomware attack. By following the guidelines in this infographic you can significantly increase your odds of not being a victim of cybercrime! Let us know in the comments how you are protecting your data.

Boston University’s Master of Criminal Justice Online Program

E-Waste Out of Sight, Out of Mind

Technology is in hyper-drive speed as it continues to advance. Because of these ongoing improvements, computers, printers, smartphones and other electronic items are finding their way to our landfills faster than ever. However, there are large amounts of dollars—billions, in fact—of recyclable materials in this e-waste that we can recoup if we take the necessary steps. Take a look at the staggering statistics that surround e-waste in this infographic. Need to properly dispose of e-waste at your workplace or home? See our blog on recycling old technology.

 

Discarded electrical appliances are called electronic waste, or e-waste. Computers, cell phones, TVs, refrigerators, monitors and microwaves are common e-waste items. Disposal of electronic items is one of modern society’s most critical environmental concerns. The issue is largely “out of sight, out of mind.” Here are the disturbing numbers and facts.

What is e-waste?
Any unwanted or obsolete electronic item – operational or not. Cell phones, televisions, VCRs, DVD players, stereos, copiers, fax machines, computers, monitors, CDs, etc.
Average e-waste produced every year The UN says 41.8 million tons of e-waste were produced last year worldwide.  90% was illegally traded, exported or dumped
On average each American generated 48 pounds of e-waste. (equivalent of every American throwing out 11 laptops every year)
Only 12.5% of total e-waste is recycled. The U.S. is the worst offender – 9.4 million tons/year
According to the EPA, recycling 1 million laptops saves the energy equivalent of electricity used by 3,657 U.S. homes in a year. Electronics are full of valuable resources such as silver, gold, titanium, fossil fuels, aluminum, iron, copper, and more.

Raw materials in e-waste
In 2014, $50 billion worth of recyclable materials was present in e-waste products.
Raw materials in single-year’s e-waste Silver $.3 Billion Palladium $1.8 Billion Aluminum $3 Billion Plastics $12.3 Billion Iron $9 Billion Gold $10.3 Billion Copper $10.5 Billion Last year,
Apple pulled $40 million worth of gold from recycled phones.

The Internet and e-waste
The Internet was supposed to decrease e-waste. But the advent of new devices means old ones are thrown out. other types of waste are decreasing; however, e-waste is growing close to 5% annually.
More than 5.5 million boxes of software go to landfills and incinerators.
Online downloads and streaming are causing CDs to become obsolete.
Millions of music CDs thrown away each year. Every month, approximately 100,000lbs of CDs become obsolete.
It takes over 1 million years for a CD to decompose in a landfill.

Most used and replaced electronics
Cellphones – Replaced every 22 months
Computer – Replaced every 2 years
Television – Replaced every 10 years
Printer – Replaced every 5 years

Where cell phones go to die
Approximately 350,000 phones are disposed of daily = More than 152 million phones each year.
More than 7.2 billion mobile phones in existence (the Earth’s population is 7.4 billion).
80% of phones end up in landfills. Exported to countries like Ghana, India, and China where civilians salvage electronics in hazardous/toxic conditions.
For every 1 million cell phones recycled, 35,274 lbs of copper, 77 lbs of silver, 75 lbs of gold, and 33 lbs of palladium can be recovered.
Americans throw out phones containing $60 million in gold and silver every year.

What can we do about e-waste?
Re-evaluate: Do you need that gadget?
Extend the life of your electronics: Buy a case. Avoid overcharging the battery.
Buy environmentally friendly electronics. Look for ENERGY STAR or Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Took (EPEAT) certification.
Donate used goods to social programs: Children safety initiatives; domestic violence victims, etc. Reuse large electronics. Use e-waste recycle bins.

Good Ethics Are Good Business

With the need to maximize profits, companies are under constant pressure to maximize profits any way that they can. Take the automaker Volkswagen for instance. Volkswagen gamed the software in nearly 600,000 diesel vehicles to pass emission tests. The emissions from the cars were almost 40 times the permitted levels of nitrogen oxides. Dishonest accounting factors led to the downfall of Enron and WorldCom. In fact, since 1980 more than half of the 10 largest corporate bankruptcies were the result of unethical business practices.

The question now is do businesses that resort to unethical business practices gain an advantage over their competition? A recent study showed that the stock price growth of 100 firms with the most ethical cultures outperformed the stock market and their competition by almost 300%. They had a lower turnover of employees and higher employee job satisfaction. All in all good ethics lead to good business as we see in the infographic below. What are you doing to breed good ethics in your business to help it succeed? Reply in the comments below.

Good Ethics are Good Business

Norwich University Online Master of Science in Leadership Program

20th Century Encryption Technology

Secret or deceptive methods have been use for centuries to cover up private messages to keep them out of the hands of enemies or those without the need to know. Steganography or the practice of concealing information dates back at least 500 years. In the digital age our messages have advanced from Morse code to digital code transferred through the Internet. From the 20th century and beyond we still look for ways to protect or conceal our messages just as they did centuries ago, but now we use encryption. Check out this infographic on the evolution of encryption technology, which has abounded throughout the last century and continues to do so today at an accelerated rate.

http://graduatedegrees.online.njit.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/20th-Century-and-Beyond-Encryption-Technology-01-1.pngNJIT Computer Science Online

10 great but inaccurate quotes from technology

Can you remember a time when you said something you wish you hadn’t said? You’re not alone. Each of us is guilty of that. Even the brightest minds have said things they wish they hadn’t said, especially if what they said was a bold statement or proclamation that never came to pass, not even sort of. But that’s OK; such statements make for good conversation even years later. Enjoy our latest infographic!












The greatest tech minds of the 20th and 21st centuries were responsible for great discoveries and insights that changed the way we work, think, relax, and play. But those same great minds also allowed their mouths to say a few things that today cause us to shake our heads and wonder, and maybe even chuckle. Oh, well, no one’s perfect. Take a look at the 10 quotes in our latest infographic and then see if you can guess what year it was said. Answers are at the bottom of the infographic.

The Quotes
1. “Two years from now, spam will be solved.”
2. “You have zero privacy anyway. Get over it.”
3. “But what…is it good for?”
4. “I predict the Internet will soon go spectacularly supernova and in 1996 catastrophically collapse.”
5. “It doesn’t matter how good or bad the product is, the fact is that people don’t read anymore.”
6. “Linux is not in the public domain. Linux is a cancer.”
7. “If you have something that you don’t want anyone to know, maybe you shouldn’t be doing it in the first place.”
8. “There is no reason anyone would want a computer in their home.”
9. “If you’re wrong, you will die.”
10. “Apple is already dead.”

Who said it and when
1. Microsoft’s co-founder Bill Gates made this prediction in 2007 at the World Economic Forum. Maybe he meant SPAM, that canned precooked meat product? No, that’s still around, too.
2. Scott McNealy, CEO and co-founder of Sun Microsystems, speaking about online privacy in 1999. All these years later, he’s probably right, but privacy should be the goal nevertheless.
3. Engineer at the Advanced Computing Systems Division at IBM, commenting on the microchip. Of course, most of us would have probably agreed if we were working in tech back in 1968.
4. Robert Metcalfe, founder of 3Com, said this in 1995. But we can forgive Metcalfe; after all, he is credited with inventing the Ethernet.
5. Even Apple’s Steve Jobs made a few mistakes about technology, like how he responded in 2008 when asked about the likely success of Amazon’s Kindle e-reader.
6. Steve Ballmer, Microsoft’s former CEO, was known to be volatile when discussing the competition. It’s understandable that he would be resistant to any free open-source software.
7. Alphabet Inc. (formerly Google) executive chairman Eric Schmidt’s response when asked in 2009 about whether users should be sharing their information with Google.
8. Ken Olsen, founder of Digital Equipment Corporation, made this statement. But, hey, 1977 was a very long time ago.
9. Intel’s former CEO Andy Grove in his 1996 book, Only the Paranoid Survive. Of course, all of us have been wrong at least once, and we’re all going to die eventually, so technically he’s right.
10. Nathan Myhrvold made that statement when he was CTO of Microsoft. To be fair, Apple stock was down to about $7 a share in 1997. (Yeah, we wish we had bought shares back then, too.)

Social Media – The New Face of Disaster Response

A few weeks ago I received a notification from Facebook to let my friends know that I was safe from a bomb that apparently went off near me. I live in rural Utah and couldn’t find anything related to the bomb in the local news outlets. Unfortunately, a real bomb went off in Pakistan nearly 8,000 miles away. I later found out that Facebook had a glitch in their system, causing the same notification to be sent to many throughout the world. This made me realize that social media is a quick new way to communicate during a disaster.

As early as 2007, residents where a disaster hit started using hashtags in Twitter as an organized way of tracking what was happening in the aftermath of a disaster. You can easily find updates to a disaster when you know which hashtag is being used. Today we have a better understanding that social media is a quick way to communicate the effects of a disaster to a broader audience. The infographic below from our friends at the University of San Francisco demonstrates just how beneficial social media has been during different disasters. After perusing, let us know your thoughts in the comments section.


USF Online MPA Program

Most Prolific Hackers (infographic)

Money. Power. Politics. A new Porsche. Any one of those can be sufficient motivation for a hacker to ply his trade. These days, even with the most sophisticated security in place, hackers continue to break through the inner sanctums of government, industry, and business to steal secrets and other sensitive information like weapons technology and credit card numbers. These guys are so good that some end up making a legitimate profession by using their hacking skills. Let’s take a look back to learn about the most prolific computer hackers and the motivations behind their exploits.

As long as there have been computers, there have been hackers. Through the use of computers to gain unauthorized access to everything from radio station phone lines to government agencies, hackers have a wide variety of motives for their actions. Join us as we list the most prolific hackers to date.

Alias: The Homeless Hacker
Name: Adrian Lamo
Country of Origin: USA
Current Status: Threat analyst
Agenda: Unkown

Best Known For:

Using coffee shops and libraries as his command centers, Adrian earned his alias by hacking into The New York Times, Google, Yahoo! and Microsoft.

After an arrest and 6 months of house arrest in 2003, Lamo became an American threat analyst. He was one who turned in U.S. soldier Bradley Manning (now known as Chelsea Manning) for leaking thousands of government socuments, which shined the spotlight on the now infamous WikiLeaks website for the first time.

Alias: ASTRA
Name: Withheld from public
Country of Origin: Greece
Current Status: Inactive following arrest in 2008
Agenda: $$$

Best Known For:

This hacker has never been publicly identified, though it is suspected he was a 58-year-old math teacher. Astra spent over half a decade hacking into the aviation company Dassault Group’s inner sanctums to steal and sell weapons technology information.

Alias: Dark Dante
Name: Kevin Poulsen
Country of Origin: USA
Current Status: Senior editor for Wired magazine
Agenda: A new Porsche 944 S2

Best Known For:
Being the first American to be banned from the Internet and computers for 3 years after his release from a 5-year prison sentence for hacking.
Poulson hacked the phone lines of a local radio station to rig a competition in which he would be the 102nd caller, winning the grand prize.

Alias: Cumbajohnny, Segvec, Soupnazi, Kingchilli
Name: Albert Gonzalez
Country of Origin: USA
Current Status: Inactive, currently in prison until 2025
Agenda: $$$

Best Known For:
Starting shadowcrew.com, a website that gained up to 4,000 followers where stolen or fake passports, driver’s licenses, bank account information, debit and credit cards, etc. were bough and sold.
He hacked TJX Companies and Heartland Payment Systems to steal upwards of 45 million debit and credit card numbers. Gonzalez was arrested in 2008 for this crime.

Alias: The Condor, The Darkside Hacker
Name: Kevin Mitnick
Country of Origin: USA
Current Status: Security consultant and author of two books
Agenda: Social engineering

Best Known For:
Being “the most wanted computer criminal.”

Mitnick started his illustrious career by bypassing the punch card system on the city bus line in Los Angeles. Soon he was hacking Motorola, IBM, the Pentagon, and others.
In 1995, a judge placed him in solitary confinement, fearing Mitnick’s skills were so diverse he could start a nuclear war by whistling codes into a payphone.

Alias: c0mrade
Name: Jonathan James
Country of Origin: USA
Current Status: Committed suicide in 2008
Agenda: Unknown

Best Known For:
Being the first juvenile to be tried and sentenced for hacking in America.

At 15, James began hacking into the Miami-Dade School System, Bell South, the Department of Defense, and NASA. He also intercepted source code for the International Space Staion, causing NASA to shut down its computers for 3 weeks to fix the breach.

Alias: Unknown
Name: Vladimir Levin
Country of Origin: Russia
Current Status: Whereabouts unkown
Agenda: $$$

Best Known For:
Without using the internet, but instead, a telecommunications system, he was able to gain access to millions of dollards, which he siphoned off and split between his 2 partners. After serving 3 years in prison, he was ordered to pay back only part of the money because that was all that could be recovered.

Alias: Solo
Name: Gary McKinnon
Country of Origin: England
Current Status: Currently lives in England
Agenda: Looking for evidence of UFO’s

Best Known For:
Hacking into 100 American military and NASA servers from his girlfriend’s aunt’s house. He deleted sensitive software, files, and data.
Later he shut down 2,000 comptuers in the US Army’s Military District of Washington network in just 24 hours, making it the largest military computer hack of all time, rendering the US military network inoperable for days.

Alias: Syrian Electronic Army (group)
Name: Unknown
Country of Origin: Syria
Current Status: Active
Agenda: Support Syrian President Bashar al-Assad

Best Known For:
Hacking US President Barack Obama’s and the Associated Press’ Twitter feeds are just two of the high-profile altercations they’ve been involved in. The Syrian Electronic Army has also attacked political opposition groups, western news organizations, human rights groups, government websites, and US defense contractors.

Alias: Anonymous (group)
Name: Unknown
Country of Origin: Multiple
Current Status: Active
Agenda: Social causes

Best Known For:

Being a group of individual members (known as Anons) from around the globe who unite for social causes.

Anonymous has attacked government, religious, and corporate websites.  Among their targets are the Vatican, the FBI, the CIA, Paypal, Sony, MasterCard, and Visa , as well as the Chinese, Israeli, Tunisian, and Ugandan governments.

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The True Cost of Poor Cybersecurity

It might be the oldest attitude in the books: “It won’t happen to me.” Or, “I’ll take care of it later.” But there is a reality that can be costly to businesses, even to the point of taking a business offline or out of commission for good. We’re talking about cyberattacks. They can happen to anyone, anytime. The cost? —Six figures? Seven figures? Ten figures? Depending on the size of the business, any one of these amounts is possible. Take a look at our infographic to explore the true cost of poor cybersecurity.


THE TRUE COST OF POOR CYBERSECURITY: The 5 Worst Data Breaches and Most Costly Viruses
Everyone thinks it always happens to someone else and they are safe from a cyberattack. The companies and individuals on our countdown certainly thought that. Cyberattacks can happen to anyone at anytime.   Whether it is hackers or self-replicating viruses, poor cybersecurity can end up costing you a lot.

5 Worst Data Breaches
#1 American Business Hack
Year: 2005–2012
Records Lost: 160 million
A hacking ring from Russia and Ukraine targeted banks, retail chain stores and payment processors, stealing more than 160 million credit and debit card numbers and more than 800,000 bank account numbers.
#2 eBay
Year: 2014
Records Lost: 145 million
No credit card information was compromised; however, hackers stole customer names, addresses, date of birth, and other personal information. Password information was also compromised. The online auction house simply asked customers to change their passwords immediately.
#3 Heartland Payment Systems
Year: 2006–2008
Records Lost: 130 million
Heartland, one of the world’s largest payment processing companies, was hacked using malware, resulting in the loss of credit and debit card numbers. The mastermind behind the crime was given a 20-year jail sentence, the longest handed down for a computer crime. Heartland ended up paying credit card companies $100 million in claims settlement related to the breach.
#4 TJX
Year: 2003
Records Lost: 94 million
The parent company to stores like T. J. Maxx and Marshalls has said hackers took credit and debit card numbers, and in some instances entire customer identities were stolen, including driver license numbers. The breach ended up costing TJX $256 million and was masterminded by the same person who was in charge of the #3 Heartland hack on the countdown.
#5 Anthem
Year: 2015
Records Lost: 80 million
Names, Social Security numbers, and other sensitive information ideal for identity theft were taken from the second largest health insurance company in America. The hack was said to have originated in China.
5 Most Costly Viruses
#1 MYDOOM
Year: 2004
PCs Infected: 2 Million
Damages: $38,000,000,000
MyDoom was a worm spread through e-mail. 1 in 4 e-mails carried the virus at one time. Mydom was a line in the program’s code (mydomain) and thus, after adding an “o”, it was named.
#2 SOBIG.F
Year: 2003
PCs Infected: 2 Million
Damages: $37,100,000,000
Self-replicating worm spread through e-mail.
#3 ILOVEYOU
Year: 2000
PCs Infected: 500,000 (That’s about 10% of the world’s computers at the time)
Malicious program hidden in an email attachment. ILOVEYOU was the first virus that attached itself to an e-mail.
#4 CONFICKER
Year: 2007
PCs Infected: 12 Million
Damages: $9,100,000,000
Confliker was a worm that scanned computers for weaknesses, logged keystrokes and downloaded code from hacker websites. This virus is still active and as of August 2015, is still infecting about 1 million computers worldwide.
#5 CODE RED
Year: 2001
PCs Infected: 1 Million
Damages: $2,600,000,000
Code Red was a worm that exploited an OS vulnerability, actively looking for other machines to attack. It took down and defaced websites, most notably whitehouse.gov. It was nicknamed Code Red because the pair who discovered the virus were drinking Mountain Dew Code Red at the time of discovery.
35% of businesses have lost data due to flawed IT security. Don’t be caught unprepared. Let Mozy help you manage your cloud security needs.
Visit http://mozy.com/product/features/military-grade-security to learn more about how Mozy can keep your data safe and secure.
Source:
http://www.kaspersky.com/about/news/virus/2013/35_of_businesses_have_lost_data_due_to_flawed_IT_security
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-switch/wp/2015/02/27/security-firm-finds-link-between-china-and-anthem-hack/
http://www.informationisbeautiful.net/visualizations/worlds-biggest-data-breaches
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/biggest-worst-data-breaches-hacks_55d4b5a5e4b07addcb44fd9e
http://www.tomsguide.com/us/biggest-data-breaches,news-19083.html
http://www.cio.com/article/2399262/data-breach/the-15-worst-data-security-breaches-of-the-21st-century.html?page=2
http://computer.howstuffworks.com/worst-computer-viruses.htm#page=4
http://uk.norton.com/top-5-viruses/promo
http://www.hongkiat.com/blog/famous-malicious-computer-viruses/
http://www.investopedia.com/financial-edge/0512/10-of-the-most-costly-computer-viruses-of-all-time.aspx
http://www.computerworld.com/article/2956312/malware-vulnerabilities/remember-conficker-its-still-around.html

Threats to Enterprise Businesses – Infographic

We got to thinking about the enterprise and how it’s often thought of as a modern-day venture. But the enterprise has been around a long time. In fact, historically, enterprise-sized companies have come and gone for any number of reasons, primarily because they weren’t prepared for the unexpected or they underestimated economic indicators. And today’s enterprises are no less immune from threats than yesterday’s enterprises. Whether man-made or natural, internal or external, there are persistent forces out there ready to take down any enterprise not properly prepared or protected. If you’re looking to protect your business from data loss, take a look at MozyEnterprise by EMC, a cloud-based solution that protects data and provides data restores. We’ve been around a long time and we’re here to help you do the same.

MozyEnterprise Online Backup

The Most Influential Tech Inventions and Discoveries from Each Month of the Year

 

Take a stroll down memory lane and discover when each of these ground-breaking, tech-related innovations and discoveries became a reality.

Months of the Year

  • The first iPhone is unveiled by Steve Jobs on January 9, 2007. “Project Purple” as it was code named throughout production was the first smart phone to fully utilize the touch screen as well as run on a computer operating system.
  • The phonograph is patented  on February 19, 1878. This invention was the first of its kind to be able to record and reproduce sound.
  • The first HDD is patented on March 11, 1970. Because of the hard disk drive, future storage services such as the cloud could become a reality
  • The first lap top is released on April 3, 1981. While it may have only included a single sided, single density 64 KB floppy drive the Osborne 1 revolutionized the possibilities for micro-computers.
  • The first fiber optic is tested by AT&T on May 11, 1977. Without the invention of the low-loss optical fiber our “information superhighway” would not be possible.
  • The first public color TV is demonstrated on June 27, 1929. From that point on and regardless of how large or small the device, the masses expected to view it in color.
  • The Sony Walkman is released in Japan on July 1, 1979. The Walkman TPS-L2 forever changed the way people would listen to music on the go.
  • The World Wide Web debuts on August 6, 1991. After months of strictly professional use Tim Berners-Lee opened up his invention to the public and transformed communication as we know it.
  • Genetic fingerprinting is discovered by Dr. Alec Jeffreys in September 1984.This remains our only unique identifier that cannot be altered or appear exactly as someone else’s.
  • Sputnik, the first human-made satellite to orbit the earth, is launched by Russia on October 4, 1957. This milestone sparked the space race.
  • The first CGI is used in movie “Westworld” on November 21, 1973. The first use of this was done to pixelate photography in order to capture a robot’s point of view.
  • The first home security system is patented on December 2, 1969 by Marie Brown. This gave homes a new level of security never before available to the populous.