The new year is the right time to try out a new gadget or two

Someday it would be great to attend the Consumer Electronics Show (better known as CES) in person. The world-renowned electronics and technology trade show attracts thousands of companies and industry experts to Las Vegas from all over the world. But until I get that invitation, I’ll just enjoy reading and watching snippets online of the different products being demoed. This year I saw everything from super strollers that have phone chargers to amazing cars that can do things once only seen in science fiction movies to smart home gadgets for just about anything you can think of to dog collar cameras. The creativity and innovation displayed at CES is exciting.

Even with all of the incredible technology at CES, I think most of the gadgets on display at the conference are things that the average person isn’t going to purchase, in part because they are a little out there. In other words, most of us don’t have a practical application for the gadget. Yeah, some of these gadgets are cool, but I’d never really use them.

On the other hand, there are a number of gadgets and technologies at CES that are practical and would make sense for the average Joe to use. And new and cutting-edge technologies are becoming easier and easier for the average person to use and afford.

One example of a technology that has become easier to use is media servers. It has been a hope of mine to have a media server; however, because it seemed to be too complicated to set up—and it was definitely too expensive to purchase—I was satisfied to simply explore by reading (and dreaming!) about it. But things have changed! After learning about some of the new technology now available, I realized that purchasing and setting up a home media server was something I could afford to do.

So, I got a computer and installed a program called Plex to manage all my personal media collection. After spending a few more bucks on the Plex app, I now can stream my music and movies through my Google Chromecast to my TV. Without any hesitation, I can tell you that I am glad that I did it. It’s simple and awesome.

My point is that today there is a ton of sweet technologies and gadgets out there, and they are becoming easier to use.

CES is a great reminder to us of the new technology that’s out there. I encourage you to investigate a new technology, software, or app. And don’t be afraid to try out something new! It doesn’t have to be complicated. For example, consider going to your local Home Depot and purchasing Belkin WeMo devices to start your journey to home automation. These easy-to-use outlets and switches take advantage of your mobile Internet so that you can control some of the most common devices in your home from your smartphone or tablet.

Here’s my suggestion to you for 2015: Try out a new app, gadget, program or design. It’s never too late to make it your new year’s resolution. You’ll never know just how simple and awesome it can be until you give it a try!

Mozy gives back

This past holiday season the Mozy team based in Pleasant Grove, Utah, participated in its annual food drive to benefit the Utah Food Bank. This year the results were dramatic. Mozy employees donated 2,153 food items. That’s an average of 13 items per employee. (While we don’t envy the crew that had to cart the items from the second floor of our building to the delivery truck, we do appreciate their efforts.)

When you consider that the average can of food weighs 15 ounces, Mozy’s donations represent hundreds of meals for individuals and families in need.

The following Mozy teams participated in the food drive: Engineering, Finance, Marketing, PM/BU, QA/PgM, Rubicon, Sales, and Support. Of particular note are the efforts of our Support team; members brought in a whopping 1,089 items! And during all of the activity of giving, they never missed an incoming call. Talk about Support’s support!

Thanks to all who participated in the food drive. We look forward to raising the bar next year with expectations for even more donations. But you don’t have to wait until the next holiday season to donate. The Utah Food Bank is always grateful for you canned donations, particularly high-protein items such as tuna and peanut butter. And that’s an effort Mozy is proud to back.

Something Really Scary

Ever since I was a kid I’ve been terrified of water. Fifteen years later I can still remember going to the local water park every summer with my friends. Unfortunately for me, my friends were obsessed with the diving boards; specifically, the highest one. I’d watch them flip, dive, and pose their fearless selves into the deep end of what seemed like sheer terror to me. They would always break the water’s surface with the cheesiest grins. When it was my turn to jump off the diving board all of the fun and grinning came to an abrupt end. Instead, I would tense up and attempt to fight off my nerves by trying not to think about what could be lurking down below.

As a kid, if there’s anything worse than the fear of death, it’s the fear of embarrassment. So I would jump in and Michael Phelps my way towards the nearest ladder, which seemed like an eternity away. The reason for all of this terror goes back to one all-encompassing experience. I saw the movie “Jaws.”  I know that what happened in “Jaws” is not real. There was never a shark named Bruce that terrorized swimmers off the coast of a fictional city called Amity. Whether the movie “Jaws” is real or not doesn’t determine why I’m too scared to go in the ocean, let alone a swimming pool!
It boils down to how I remember feeling and how I feel when I watch a scary movie such as “Jaws.” My 11-year old self and my 26-year old self experience the same psychological and emotional effects whenever I watch a scary movie. My heart rate increases. My hands and my feet begin to sweat. I tense up and feel my anxiety bubbling up. In this state the slightest scare will launch me up out of my wits.

Scary movies are meant to make us feel and think this way. But what sounds scarier: Being involved in a shark attack or having your hard drive crash? Despite all of my fears and still not wanting to go in the water, it was mind boggling to learn that there were a mere 53 shark attacks in the United States in 2013.  On the other hand, 7,280,000 hard drives crash every year! Perhaps I should spend more time trying to prevent an incident that has a 137,358 percent greater chance of happening to me.

Losing all of your data also means losing all of your photos, videos, emails, documents, and more. For some this could feel as bad if not worse than some of the scenarios the characters from scary movies are placed in. A major difference between losing your data and watching a scary movie is the enormous financial and/or personal losses, not to mention the effects from losing your data could end up lasting a lot longer or even be permanent.

Unlike losing your data, all movies come to an end. You might be terrified from the movie you’ve been watching for the past couple of hours, but when the credits roll up you will still be safely scared in your seat. And even when those inevitable feelings of terror and panic return years later, Bruce the shark won’t be inching on your heels in the deep end of that swimming pool.

Securely backing up your data with Mozy is the best guarantee available if you want to keep your fears of losing your data from becoming a reality. True peace of mind really is invaluable. And don’t lose too much sleep worrying about me trying to avoid all bodies of water, swimming pools included. Get that data securely backed up and I’ll see you front row at the movies.

Oh, baby, technology’s sweet!

One of my co-workers recently became a dad for the first time. He and his wife are the proud parents of a baby girl.

As a parent of adult children, I can tell you that parenting these days is a bit easier, thanks in large part to modern technology. Take, for example, monitors. They’ve come a long way, baby.

Today’s technology not only allows parents to use their baby monitor to listen from another room, parents can also use the monitor to talk to their baby and watch their baby. You can even download an app that works with your monitor so that no matter where you are, you can keep tabs on your little one. Using any Internet-enabled smartphone or handheld device, you can listen to, watch, or talk to your baby from anywhere you have a connection. Baby is a star and doesn’t even know it.

The disposable diaper, which was introduced in the early ‘60s, will soon be able to inform parents when baby has done the dirty diaper deed. That’s right: a small moisture sensor will sync with an app that will tweet you whenever baby needs a change. The diaper even has a clever name: TweetPee. It stinks that the diaper is not yet available (it’s currently in beta), but it should be available to the masses dealing with messes soon.

And speaking of diapers, you’ve heard of smarty pants, now there are smarty diapers. Currently, there is at least one “smart” diaper available that can help you monitor your baby’s health using what’s in the diaper. The diaper looks like an ordinary disposable diaper, except for the small colorful square with the QR code on the front. The square accumulates data based on what accumulates in the diaper. The square can be scanned and the data uploaded with a smartphone and then analyzed for possible issues, including urinary tract infections and dehydration, and even diabetes.

These days, even something as simple as taking your baby’s temperature is much easier. Digital thermometers are superfast, super accurate, and super easy to read. Within a matter of seconds a parent can know their baby’s temperature (after an audible alert or flashing light) and see the results on an easy-to-read back-lit screen. Some of these thermometers even store the most recent past readings in their memory so you can identify trends.

Baby car seats have gone high tech, too. The Carkoon baby seat features a sliding protective shell made from Kevlar (a super-strong material that’s even bulletproof) and Nomex (a highly flame-resistant material used by firefighters, fighter pilots, refinery workers, and others) that the company says will keep the baby safe for 18 minutes. The design literally “cocoons” the baby in her seat. This next-generation safety seat also includes a transmitter that alerts emergency services to the accident scene using GPS coordinates.

Regardless of the technology, babies are still babies. With that comes the inevitable crying that results from needing or wanting something. Sometimes the solution is easy: change the baby’s diaper, feed the baby, hold the baby, sing to the baby, etc. One small handheld device may actually help you figure out the right answer quickly in case it’s not so obvious. The CryTranslator is a small handheld device that “translates” your baby’s crying. The device is not designed to replace a parent’s intuition but help interpret why baby is crying and then make suggestions.

Just like more and more parents are relying on the latest technology to make life easier, better and safer for their little ones, more and more businesses rely on Mozy by EMC for data backup and access. From an individual business owner to the enterprise with many thousands of employees and devices, including servers, desktops and laptops, and handhelds located at headquarters and remote and branch offices around the world, Mozy offers complete data protection in the cloud. After all, we hate to see a grownup cry over lost data.



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The cloud saves the day and other non-myths

It’s no surprise that we frequently write about the cloud on our blog. We think the cloud is bigger than sliced bread. And during the holiday season, it’s certainly much, much bigger than sliced fruit cake. But whatever you think of the cloud, it is a lot bigger than just one thing.

Sure, the cloud can save you lots of money. It can make data protection a lot more convenient. And it can save your bacon if your company’s computers are destroyed in a fire or flood. But again, the cloud is more than just one thing. Because of that, there are lots of myths surrounding it.

One of the key findings in Gartner’s recent The Top 10 Cloud Myths report is that “Cloud computing is uniquely susceptible to the perils of myths due to the nature, confusion and hype surrounding it.”

Consider the 10 myths highlighted in the Gartner report:

  • Myth 1: Cloud Is Always About Money
  • Myth 2: You Have to Be Cloud to Be Good
  • Myth 3: Cloud Should Be Used for Everything
  • Myth 4: “The CEO Said So” Is a Cloud Strategy
  • Myth 5: We Need One Cloud Strategy or Vendor
  • Myth 6: Cloud Is Less Secure Than On-Premises Capabilities
  • Myth 7: Cloud Is Not for Mission-Critical Use
  • Myth 8: Cloud = Data Center
  • Myth 9: Migrating to the Cloud Means You Automatically Get All Cloud Characteristics
  • Myth 10: Virtualization = Private Cloud

Like anything else of value, the cloud is what you make of it. For example, you’ve no doubt heard someone say that the cloud is great for backing up data.

Yes, the cloud is great for backing up. But backup is only part of the value. When you understand the many things the cloud can do for your organization, therein lies the greater value. In many respects, the overall value—the sum of the cloud parts—is much greater. For example, it’s tough to measure the value of the peace of mind that results from knowing that your data is backed up AND recoverable. All it takes is for one employee’s laptop with critical data on it to be lost or stolen to really appreciate the value of the cloud. Lost data that’s recoverable—that’s priceless.

Based on the amount of data that people lose, recovery is an ongoing necessity—and a crucial benefit of the cloud.

Consider that 70 percent of people who carry around a laptop, smartphone, or tablet have lost a storage device. In fact, the average person now loses 1.24 data-holding items each year and less than half of those items are ever recovered. The average cost of a lost item is about $200, but it’s not the cost of the item itself that has the greatest impact. It’s the data on the item. In a 2012 independent survey of 3,500 people in the U.S. and Europe, 57 percent of those who lost a device said that they were more upset about losing the data on the device than the device itself. After all, the device is usually replaceable; however, the data is not—unless it has been backed up and is recoverable.

So when the data from that laptop that was left behind in the taxi that was never seen again is quickly recovered just in time for the CEO’s presentation, which motivates the sales force to such an extent that they increase sales by 200 percent during the next quarter, which catches the interest of a VC firm, which eventually takes the company public, which makes a lot of employees really wealthy, which calls for a celebration in which very excited employees light off fireworks in the break room, which causes the fire sprinklers to go off in the building, which causes major damage to a whole bunch of computers, which causes everyone to give a sigh of relief because they know their data is backed up to the cloud, well, it’s easy to see how the cloud can continue to be the source of yet another myth.

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Do you have too much access to data?

Be aware: You probably have access to too much data!

That’s right: you can access data you’re unauthorized to see. That’s according to the Ponemon Institute’s latest research report, Corporate Data: A Protected Asset or a Ticking Time Bomb?

In its December 2014 report, the research center found that 71 percent of the 2,276 U.S. and European employees surveyed have access to sensitive information that they don’t need access to.

The report reveals that there is insufficient oversight and control over employees who have access to confidential information. Oftentimes, such information is sensitive in nature and includes:
• Customer lists and contact information
• Intellectual property
• Private information about customers, employees, and business partners

Part of the challenge with controlling data is that too much oversight could sacrifice employee productivity. On the one hand, employees cannot work efficiently if they cannot access the information they need to do their jobs. On the other hand, too little oversight means that employees can access sensitive data that they don’t have any reason to access, jeopardizing an organization’s security and the privacy of customers, co-workers, and others.

Interestingly, it is the employees themselves who believe that they have access to company data that they should not have access to. Even so, of the 71 percent who said that they have such access, 54 percent admitted that their access to the information is frequent or even very frequent. In other words, they know they shouldn’t be accessing the data but they’re doing it anyway, even frequently.

The report found that employees who participated in the survey believe that data protection oversight and controls to their company data are weak. That’s a serious concern, but no less concerning than the survey’s finding that 78 percent believe their organization is unable to tell them what happened to lost data, files, and emails.

It should come as no surprise that IT professionals who participated in the study agree with employees who believe that data protection oversight and controls to the data are weak. Part of the problem, according to the IT practitioners, is that their organizations do not enforce a need-to-know data policy.

Although more than 70 percent of IT practitioners in the survey said that their department takes data protection very seriously, clearly more needs to be done to ensure that their data is protected from unauthorized access.

What can be done to protect corporate data? First, organizations must see data protection as a priority. Second, organizations must ensure that they have a need-to-know data policy and then enforce it. Unenforced policies increase the risk of misused and unauthorized access to confidential and sensitive data.

Today’s technology allows the workforce to access large amounts of data quickly and easily, even from smartphones and tablets. Fortunately, with Mozy cloud backup, critical and confidential data on servers, desktops, and portable devices can be automatically backed up and protected. With Mozy, your data is always protected, recoverable, and secure.

Top Natural Disasters that Threaten Businesses – Infographic

We love this infographic from our friends at Eastern Kentucky University Online. It takes an in-depth look at what can happen to a business when a natural disaster hits. Don’t let your business be one of the six in ten that don’t protect their most crucial files. Be sure to protect your business files with MozyEnterprise cloud backup.

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$1.7 trillion says a bundle about data losses and downtime

By anyone’s standards, US$1,700,000,000,000.00 is a lot of money.

According to the findings of a recently released study, globally, enterprises are losing as much as $1.7 trillion through data loss and unplanned downtime.

The EMC Global Data Protection Index (GDPI), which was commissioned by EMC Corp. and conducted by the global technology market research firm Vanson Bourne, is the result of interviews with 3,300 IT decision makers from 24 countries. All respondents were from enterprise-size organizations of at least 250 employees or more.
The study had three primary goals:
•    Calculate the impact of data loss to existing businesses.
•    Assess the maturity level of data protection strategies in multiple countries.
•    Measure IT leaders’ confidence in protecting new and emerging workloads—cloud, big data, and mobility.

In assessing the maturity level of their organization’s data protection, IT decision makers were asked questions relating to their backup and recovery experience, strategy, and infrastructure. Points were awarded to each organization based on the maturity of their data protection strategy, including for shorter recovery times, confidence in backup infrastructure, modern backup systems, and the ability to replicate data offsite. Here are the results:
•    Laggards (scored between 1–25 points): 36.8 percent
•    Evaluators (scored between 26–50 points): 49.5 percent
•    Adopters (scored between 51–75 points): 11.3 percent
•    Leaders (scored between 76–100 points): 2.4 percent

Only 13 percent of organizations globally can be described as adopters or leaders, or, in other words, those who are ahead of the maturity curve. Clearly, many organizations need to redefine their data protection strategy, especially when one considers that of the organizations represented in the study, during the past 12 months:
•    64 percent experienced data loss or unplanned downtime
•    49 percent experienced unplanned downtime
•    32 percent experienced data loss
•    17 percent experienced data loss and downtime

Worldwide, the estimated annual cost for disruptions equates to $754 billion for data loss and $954 billion for downtime, for a total of $1.7 trillion. Regardless of whether an organization is defined as a laggard, evaluator, adopter, or leader, organizations large and small are losing money as the result of data loss and unplanned downtime. But it doesn’t have to be that way. EMC recommends the following:
•    Make sure there’s an appropriate data protection solution in place for all of your critical data no matter where it is or how it is generated.
•    Manage an integrated data protection strategy and maintain a level of visibility and control for application owners.
•    Evaluate the gaps in your protection strategy that may emerge from disparate vendor solutions.
•    Match your data protection approach with the availability and protection requirements for your tiers of applications/data.
•    Understand who owns data protection, especially in the cloud.

All companies can do more to ensure that one of their primary assets—their data—is protected from loss, damage, or theft. After all, no one needs to be convinced that being a laggard is a lot more costly than being a leader. Fortunately, the tools are available to avoid contributing to that $1.7 trillion for disruptions. You CAN be a leader.

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How we love to squeeze the cloud for all it’s worth

The holiday season is yet another opportunity to consider how much influence cloud computing has in our lives. For example, have you:

•  Sent holiday greetings and family photos using your Facebook or Gmail account?

•  Purchased any gifts from or other online stores?

•  Downloaded and watched a favorite holiday movie or TV show from Netflix?

•  Downloaded a new or favorite holiday song from iTunes on your handheld device?

If you have, then you have benefited from the cloud.

Although all of us are taking advantage of the cloud, do we ever consider how different life would be without it? For example, what happens when the weather turns bad? Are we prepared for a bad day of cloud computing?

Will your holiday greetings and sharing of family photos be delayed? Will your online order arrive late? Will you be watching “It’s a Wonderful Life” after the holidays? Will you be tapping your fingers wondering when you’ll get to hear “It’s the Most Wonderful Time of the Year”?

Come again?

Believe it or not, lots of people (to be exact, 51 percent of 1,000 people surveyed) think that bad weather affects cloud computing. And of those 1,000 people surveyed, 95 percent don’t think that they use the cloud. These are the same people who:

•  Bank online

•  Shop online

•  Use social networking such as Facebook and Twitter

•  Store photos online

•  Store music online

•  Play online games

Granted, the Wakefield Research survey was conducted more than two years ago; however, even today many who regularly use the cloud aren’t always aware that they are in fact enjoying many everyday conveniences because of the cloud.

Surprisingly, some university students aren’t sure what the cloud is. Surprising because it is students who have embraced the benefits of the cloud perhaps more enthusiastically than any other single group. Yet when a senior executive veteran of the IT industry asked (via a Skype call!) a group of university students enrolled in a digital journalism class if they had ever used the public cloud, no hands went up. Eventually, one student tentatively offered up “Google Docs?”

Those of us who use the cloud and can also define what the cloud is and the countless benefits it provides—such as backing up our data and safeguarding it should  it ever need to be restored—need to do a better job of educating the masses that the cloud is an important part of life. All of us use the cloud and benefit from it greatly every day.

Some will continue to define the cloud as a “fluffy white thing.” Others will define it as a place to store, access, and share data using their Internet-connected device. But all will continue to enjoy life made easier and more enjoyable because of the cloud—even if Buffalo gets another five feet of snow.

So, if you haven’t already done so, now might be the perfect time to download “The Christmas Song” by Nat King Cole.

Happy holidays.


My name is Eric and I work for Mozy

Mozy scored big when they got years of expertise in technology by hiring Eric, otherwise known as Magnum PI around the office (Tom Selleck would be proud of Eric’s stash!). Eric passes many  tech companies that would love to have him as he endures a long commute from his serene sprawling ranch here in Utah.

I define my workspace as…

Wherever I am with my laptop; I don’t necessarily have to be at my desk in order to be productive. When I’m at my desk it’s lined with my kid’s sports schedules and Hot Wheels cars.

A device I can’t live without….

My mobile phone. I use it to email and text for work. Also, it connects into my second most essential device—my car, via Bluetooth.

When I arrive at work, I typically start my day off by…

Checking my calendar and email. I have usually already checked email before I get to work see if any communications have been received from our Cork, Ireland, office since part of our team resides there.

My work routine is…

Depends on the projects that are on my docket. We have regular meetings to discuss the progress of projects and what hurdles need to be removed in order to complete those projects. I also spend time generating reports, updating documents, and meeting with outside groups to get our products updated and released through the same channels as the Mozy product groups.

I do/do not listen to music at work and it helps me work better because …

Yes, when the environment becomes noisy or I’m trying to shut out other distractions in order to focus on a specific task.

The best advice I can give a recent college graduate looking to do what I do is …

Be teachable, listen to your co-workers, and choose your mentors wisely. There are many aspects to this position and it takes a long time to become adept at all of the nuances, so be patient. Be polite, you will have to work with those that you are working with now on another project in the future. It helps to treat everyone with respect and it makes everybody’s day better.

Outside of work, I am passionate about …

My family’s activities. Coaching basketball. Completing projects at home.

My eating habits are …

I say they are healthy, but my coworkers think they are bland. I try to eat reasonable portions, but I am accused of being boring in this regard.

If I could be someone for a day – I would be …

A high school teacher, perhaps in history or shop. I like working with youth and would like to make history interesting for a day or work on a classic car in a shop class.

The “secret sauce” that makes me who I am …

I am driven to completing tasks. I organize everything into tasks and that’s probably why I became a project manager; it’s a good fit. I also am a stickler for recognizing other’s efforts. I think it’s important to acknowledge co-workers when they have gone out of their way to assist you.


*Join Eric on the Mozy team!  For more details on starting your career at Mozy go to